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Coarse Hillside Specimens


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Boulder dash scores some loaded chunky specimens off the new patch. Thanks to the Gold Monster 1000 , I scored one nice piece as well.

Unfortunately, this hillside patch is loaded with hot rocks, which can make for tough hunting with a PI. Patience and perseverance is key.

IMG_1468.JPG

Hard to tell but , my piece is peppered with gold.

IMG_1471.JPG

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Nice going guys! :)

Thanks to the Gold Monster 1000 , I scored one nice piece as well.             SAY WHAT?????  :)

Tom H.

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57 minutes ago, TomH said:

Nice going guys! :)

Thanks to the Gold Monster 1000 , I scored one nice piece as well.             SAY WHAT?????  :)

Tom H.

Exactly.  Confusion ensues. 

Anyway, great job to the both of you.

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1 hour ago, adam said:

Boulder dash scores some loaded chunky specimens off the new patch. Thanks to the Gold Monster 1000 , I scored one nice piece as well.

Unfortunately, this hillside patch is loaded with hot rocks, which can make for tough hunting with a PI. Patience and perseverance is key.

IMG_1468.JPG

Hard to tell but , my piece is peppered with gold.

IMG_1471.JPG

Isn't a PI supposed to eliminate the hot rocks?

But terrific finds in any case. Congrats.

Edited by Morlock
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Still learning my GPX 5000, but there's a certain type of Bedrock around the LSD that sounds off with the PI like a target.  Even sounds off with the pointer like a target.  After digginf into the bedrock, found that it was giving a false signal.  I've crushed and panned the rock, but the only thing I got was exercise.

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I wonder if progress is being made by Minelab and others to develop a PI that will ignore a higher percentage of hot rocks.  Some areas have the type of hot rock that has magnetic attraction.  These, at least, can be physically removed -- a lot of sweat equity for sure, at least a consideration if the pay is worth it.  The worst kind is devoid of any magnetic attraction and you just have to suffer through scores of recovery let downs before actually bagging a nugget.  But the gnarly, coarse grained nuggets depicted in the lead photo are a grand reward for all that perseverance.

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Even the ZED cannot handle hot rocks.  But then, i like to know the hot rocks are there.  That always tells me to keep an extra watchful eye out for gold.  

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Nice chunks Adam and Boulder dash. Thats turning out to be a great patch.

I think thats the main reason i stay in Fine Gold setting. Everywhere i have hunted here in Nevada, i have only had 1 type of rock set it off and that was basalt. I love FG with hot ground and hotrocks.

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1 hour ago, Andyy said:

Even the ZED cannot handle hot rocks.  But then, i like to know the hot rocks are there.  That always tells me to keep an extra watchful eye out for gold.  

Really,???  ..:89:....................  Strange,.. Mine can...:brows:  ....I guess because I got that new optional (limited) function when I bought it. 

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1 hour ago, nugget108 said:

Nice chunks Adam and Boulder dash. Thats turning out to be a great patch.

I think thats the main reason i stay in Fine Gold setting. Everywhere i have hunted here in Nevada, i have only had 1 type of rock set it off and that was basalt. I love FG with hot ground and hotrocks. ÔĽŅ

I do believe the bedrock was Basalt that set my 5000 off.  Not all of it, just a couple of small sections that can be measure about a square foot.

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Hey guys,  Yes there seems to be a basalt dike that cuts through the patch....It has weathered out as many small pieces that seem to litter the ground. No Worries, if I have to pick them all out one by one that`s what I will do. The steep angle of the spot is also challenging.

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To paraphrase Jim Straight: "If the old timers found iron nuggets in the wash, they would search for nuggets up on the ridges"  I like the fact that a PI generally ignores certain minerals and hot rocks, obviously that can save a lot of time and wasted effort. But I also like to know if they are there in order to gauge the degree of mineralization in the area, which can be a useful indicator. I have used a GB-2 or other VLF detector to first test the ground or drainage to see what that shows me. If I am finding iron nuggets with a VLF, especially in a drainage, I consider that a positive sign which justifies spending time on the benches, hillsides and ridges . . .  with a PI. But If my PI ignored the iron nuggets in the drainage, and if there were no other  indicators signalling the possible presence of gold,  how would I know when and where to slow down and work the hillside?

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2 hours ago, adam said:

Hey guys,  Yes there seems to be a basalt dike that cuts through the patch....It has weathered out as many small pieces that seem to litter the ground. No Worries, if I have to pick them all out one by one that`s what I will do. The steep angle of the spot is also challenging.

Yes steep is right. I ended up with 2 falls lucky my heavy pi detector broke my fall 2 times in a row.

Edited by boulder dash
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14 hours ago, BMc said:

.. If I am finding iron nuggets with a VLF, especially in a drainage, I consider that a positive sign which justifies spending time on the benches, hillsides and ridges . . .  with a PI. But If my PI ignored the iron nuggets in the drainage, and if there were no other  indicators signalling the possible presence of gold,  how would I know when and where to slow down and work the hillside?

Huh? What 'iron nuggets" are you able to find with a VLF in the washes? I agree that lots of iron minerals in the sand and coarse magnetite, hematite and other forms of iron are a great gold indicator but I have found few of these with a VLF in my 35 years of beeping. Once in a blue moon a shiny little magnetite chunk will give a positive signal.

Black sand and iron minerals generally "null" a VLF. If you are finding "iron nuggets" you have your machine balanced incorrectly or you are digging tramp metal. 

I always slow down and work the hillsides whenever I find a bit of gold in the gulch. Not when I find hot rocks or "iron nuggets". But that is just me. In the areas I prospect MOST of the gold is on hilltop and hillsides and EVERY wash is full of iron minerals and thick layers of black sand. If you have your machine tuned to hear any of this then it is working against you.

If you are looking for the areas with heavy iron mineralization your eye and a shovel is the best tool to locate them. A detector should ignore as much of that iron as possible. JMHO. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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8 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

Huh? What 'iron nuggets" are you able to find with a VLF in the washes? I agree that lots of iron minerals in the sand and coarse magnetite, hematite and other forms of iron are a great gold indicator but I have found few of these with a VLF in my 35 years of beeping. Once in a blue moon a shiny little magnetite chunk will give a positive signal.

Black sand and iron minerals generally "null" a VLF. If you are finding "iron nuggets" you have your machine balanced incorrectly or you are digging tramp metal.ÔĽŅ¬†

I always slow down and work the hillsides whenever I find a bit of gold in the gulch. Not when I find hot rocks or "iron nuggets". But that is just me. In the areas I prospect MOST of the gold is on hilltop and hillsides and EVERY wash is full of iron minerals and thick layers of black sand. If you have your machine tuned to hear any of this then it is working against you.

If you are looking for the areas with heavy iron mineralization your eye and a shovel is the best tool to locate them. A detector should ignore as much of that iron as possible. JMHO. 

 

Again: To paraphrase Jim Straight: "If the old timers found iron nuggets in the wash, they would search for nuggets up on the ridges"

I didn't make this up. 

OK, Anyone want to identify the dark iron looking mineral substance in these photographs that happen to be magnetic (including the two smaller ones stuck to the magnet) and they also just happen to give off a LOUD! signal when a VLF coil is passed over them? Anyone want to venture an opinion as to where "black sand comes from" Has anyone seen Iron Dikes (or iron nuggets) in AZ (or anywhere, (except NM), where obviously they don't exist? :)

The two combined large specimens came from the Bradshaw Mts. The one on the left weighs 11 lbs, the flatter one on the right weighs 9 lbs. I didn't weigh the smaller ones. Usually I find the smaller and even larger marble size ones in certain washes, gully's, rivulets etc.  They come in various sizes depending on the geology of the region. I have found them to be valuable indicators (like finding black sand in in rock form) but they are obviously heavier than individual grains of black sand. HEAVIER? How is that helpful? Oh yeah, gold is heavy. If I don't find any gold in the wash but I suddenly find iron nuggets, then, the basic conventional wisdom of searching the benches, slopes and ridges kicks in. Only in certain areas do I start by detecting in a drainage. If I do, start that way, I usually work the fringes,(erosional zone) of a small wash (I generally avoid large washes altogether, unless mines, or prospect diggings are on the slopes or nearby ) 

I'm looking for those small alluvial in sutu patches (like everybody else), that could still be sitting right where they hatched out from. Prospecting and detecting technique's vary. This is just another way to go about it and yes, I do want the VLF to sound off on the iron nuggets, not the black sand, (obviously)  I don't normally need a shovel or a back hoe, :rolleyes: I can gauge mineralization by sticking a magnet in the ground. Then the Minelab can take it from there.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

                                                                                                                            Magnetite photo on far right courtesy of Geology.com.

IRON.PNG

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MAGNETITE.PNG

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Yeah, I thought about calling them that too, just to avoid conflict with JMNHO Bob whose 35 years of experience seems to have stopped at the NM border, but then I realized that they didn't meet the definitional criteria. Oh well, can't win for loosing. :)

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I acknowledge and appreciate the withdrawal of your demurrer. Go in peace . . .and sin no more. :)

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