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WHERE THE ANTELOPE PLAY!


BMc

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 I first ran across a reference about the South Pass, WY gold fields in an article in the June 1999 issue of ICMJ  entitled, "Prospecting Ores Shoots and Hidden Veins for Specimen-Grade Gold Samples"   by W. Dan Hausel, WY State Geologist. After spending about a month at Rye Patch, (NV), the Eugene's and environs, and having read his fine article, in late June I got on the phone to Professor Hausel and spent 30 minutes with him going over maps of the area and geology of the Greenstone belt, which underlies the gold fields. He gave me detailed information on where to detect and the amount and size of gold that had been found historically within the region. You have to read the history mining there to believe it. Huge specimens in the past, and good sized nuggets most recently. The (historical) mining town of Atlantic City, 5 miles from South Pass City has a preserved ghost town which looks like the inhabitants just left, with place settings on the tables seen through windows of the deserted town. 
GPAA currently has a 320 acre claim (Carol Placer and MPU Placer) on and near Rock Creek, which flows below several mine drainage systems which feed into it. Multiple mining recovery methods are allowed (check regs. for specs)  In July 1999, I recovered the 5.3 gr. nugget( photo previously posted) from a tailing pile in this general area but not where the claim exists now.

SOUTH PASS CITY, WY.PNG

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Rimfire 45/70? and Nickle 3 Cent Piece: After I had struck out detecting for nuggets along an eroded rusty quartz outcrop in the area Geologist Hausel had mentioned, I hit a double on these. The 45/70 round was stuck in the ground nose down, with 1/4 inch of the case sticking out. It was intact when I pulled it out, and after being stored it in a coffee can in my truck awhile, it broke in half while I was bouncing around 4-wheeling. I taped it together to hold the powder in the case. The 3 cent piece dated 1865 was found a few inches away. 

45-70.JPG

3 CENT FRONT.PNG

3 CENT REVERSE.PNG

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Really cool finds! :ya:I didnt even know we had a 3 cent piece.

Tom H.

 

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4 hours ago, BMc said:

Rimfire 45/70? and Nickle 3 Cent Piece: After I had struck out detecting for nuggets along an eroded rusty quartz outcrop in the area Geologist Hausel had mentioned, I hit a double on these. The 45/70 round was stuck in the ground nose down, with 1/4 inch of the case sticking out. It was intact when I pulled it out, and after being stored it in a coffee can in my truck awhile, it broke in half while I was bouncing around 4-wheeling. I taped it together to hold the powder in the case. The 3 cent piece dated 1865 was found a few inches away. 

45-70.JPG

3 CENT FRONT.PNG

3 CENT REVERSE.PNG

 

43 minutes ago, TomH said:

Really cool finds! :ya:I didnt even know we had a 3 cent piece.

Tom H.

 

Very nice!

Yes a 3 cent coin, in fact there were 2  3 cent coins both in overlapping time frames one was made of nickel (1865 to 1889) and the other made of silver (1851 to 1873).

Your's is nickel it's worth a few bucks, maybe $15 to $20

But the silver coin in the same condition would be worth a few hundred.

The nickel version.

PCGS MS67

The silver version.

PCGS MS68

 

 

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Nice find Terry! Minted with a totally different design and appearance. Wonder why they used different metals? Three cents face value in those days for both coins, no? Interesting. Good info. and visual,  Au Seeker. 

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17 hours ago, BMc said:

Nice find Terry! Minted with a totally different design and appearance. Wonder why they used different metals? Three cents face value in those days for both coins, no? Interesting. Good info. and visual,  Au Seeker. 

I was thinking the exact same. Same year also?  Silver one should be worth more? Maybe they switched halfway through the year and started making them out of nickel.

EDIT.......the internet is AMAZING!

Civil War-era silver shortages led to widespread hoarding of all silver coins, and most one- and five-cent coins, as well. Various alternatives were tried, including encapsulated postage and privately issued coinage. The Treasury eventually settled on issuing fractional currency. These small denomination (3 to 50 cent) notes were never popular, as they were easy to lose and unwieldy in large amounts. The answer to this issue was reached in 1865 with the introduction of the three-cent nickel coin, composed of copper and nickel and larger than the silver coin of the same denomination. The coin featured a Liberty head obverse and another Roman numeral III reverse. The three-cent nickel was never intended as a permanent issue, only as a stopgap measure until the wartime hoarding ceased. Production began to taper off in the 1870s (except for an anomalously large coinage in 1881), but mintage of the denomination did not finally end until 1889. One reason often given for the discontinuation of the three-cent nickel piece in 1889 is that this coin and the dime (10-cent silver coin) were identical in diameter, hence caused confusion upon the introduction of mechanical vending machines.[dubious ] Another factor may have been that in 1883, the letter postage rate dropped to 2 cents, thus removing the justification for this coin.[3]

Tom H.

 

Edited by TomH
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$2.50 GOLD PIECE,  RIFLE/PISTOL SIDE PLATE. UNFIRED HAND CAST BALL SHOT,  PRIMER CAPS ETC:

Found at the same location of the nickle 3 cent piece and the "bronze" cabinet handle, along with numerous other items posted under forum relic section. The ball shot appears to possibly be .36 caliber? Anyone venture a guess as to whether the side plate is from a rifle or pistol?

Thanks, Mac

2.5 dollar gold.JPG

TWO AND A HALF REVERSE.JPG

gold coin-3 cent piece.JPG

3 cent-gold coin reverse.JPG

PERCUSSION  FIREARM.JPG

PERCUSSION-2.JPG

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The dimensions of the side plate are: 3.7/16 inches in length and 2.7/16 inches in height (measured to top of hammer) I guess that probably makes it a Pistol? Sounds pretty small to be a rifle, I would think.

Thanks Au Seeker!

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