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pondmn

eye problemssssss

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for past five  months having proplems keeping my right eyelid open.  Just closes on its own.   Fustrating.  Now only see with one eye most of the time.   Drove back from Oregon 650 miles with one eye open and the other  closed.  took three months to see a Opthamologist and all he said my vision was good but has no idea about the eyelid colosing involunarily.  Now  trying to get referral for me to neuro-opthamoligist.  Only five or six in state and those are medical professors....  No call back so far.   a friend has a similar problem and  takes painful botox shots in eyelids.   Trying to see her eyedoctor and waiting on referral that will take two weeks to find out if he will see me.  Anyone out there with similar problems...........If not  I will go as a pirate on my next costume party

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Posted (edited)

Five years ago had cardiacs, started using tablespoon of cold pressed virgin coconut oil in my oatmeal each morning they are gone now. There is an organic eye drops you can make yourself maybe that will work. At the same time started drinking good water with teaspoon each raw cider vinegar and molasses with couple drops of peppermint oil in a quart of water. Within a couple weeks started waking up in the morning feeling younger each day. Feel like a twenty year old now. Mother nature has a cure for any illness. Only eat meat, fish once a week.

Edited by wet/dry washer
Spellings

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Hey Jerry. None of us are getting any younger but a guy needs 2 eyes if at all possible I asked Dr. Google about a droopy eyelid and he said...

What is ptosis?

Pathologic droopy eyelid, also called ptosis, may occur due to trauma, age, or various medical disorders.

This condition is called unilateral ptosis when it affects one eye and bilateral ptosis when it affects both eyes.

It may come and go or it might be permanent. It can be present at birth, where it’s known as congenital ptosis, or you can develop it later in life, which is known as acquired ptosis.

Depending on the severity of the condition, droopy upper eyelids can block or greatly reduce vision depending on how much it obstructs the pupil.

In most cases, the condition will resolve, either naturally or through medical intervention.

There are many different possible causes of droopy eyelids, ranging from natural causes to more serious conditions. Your doctor will be able to help you figure out what’s causing the issue.

Anyone can get droopy eyelids, and there aren’t substantial differences in prevalence between men and women or between ethnicities.

However, it’s most common in older adults because of the natural aging process. The levator muscle is responsible for lifting the eyelid. As you age, that muscle can stretch and, as a result, cause the eyelid to fall.

Keep in mind, though, that people of all ages can be affected by this condition. In fact, babies are sometimes born with it, though this is rare.

Sometimes the exact cause is unknown, but other times it may be due to trauma. It can also be neurological.

Children

The most common cause of congenital ptosis is the levator muscle not developing properly. Children who have ptosis may also develop amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye. This disorder can also delay or limit their vision.

Certain medical conditions can also put you at risk for developing droopy eyelid.

Medical conditions

If your eyelids are drooping, it could be a sign of an underlying medical condition, especially if the issue affects both eyelids.

If just one of your eyelids droops, it may be a result of a nerve injury or a temporary stye. Routine LASIK or cataract surgery is sometimes to blame for the development of ptosis, as a result of the muscle or tendon being stretched.

Serious conditions

In some cases, droopy eyelid is caused by more serious conditions, such as a stroke, brain tumor, or cancer of the nerves or muscles.

Neurological disorders that affect the nerves or muscles of the eyes — such as myasthenia gravis — can also lead to ptosis.

More at https://www.healthline.com/health/eyelid-drooping#treatment

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Both of my eye lids drooped so bad that I could hardly see properly to drive or watch the tube.  That was around twenty years ago. I had the eye doctor look at it and he said that Medicare will take care of the expense, would I like to have it corrected.  He chopped some extra flesh out of the lid and it healed really fast.  It's been fine ever since and I do recommend it if necessary.  Anything that affects your vision get it done.  

   Old Tom

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Went to General practioner today.  He said botox common for usage to deal with problem.   waiting to see if I can get into opthmaologist......

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11 hours ago, pondmn said:

Went to General practioner today.  He said botox common for usage to deal with problem.   waiting to see if I can get into opthmaologist......

Good for you...I'd not use botox for anything...at best, it would be a temporary fix. An ophthalmologist is the right direction. 

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Plastic surgeons deal with droopy eyelids all the time. They shorten the muscle and take some eyelid out and you are good to go. 

Lots of people have droopy lids. As you age stuff gets out of proportion just like as you were growing. But uglier. From what I hear it is a fairly quick and simple surgery.

As long as it is not something neurological or stroke related a trip to the plastic surgeon is probably all that is needed. Get one with experience in reconstructive surgery and not just cosmetic surgery. They know how to take broken stuff and fix it.

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I wish the only droopy part of me was an eyelid.  Unfortunately they haven't yet invented a universal, whole-body little blue pill.  But I agree with the above comments that you don't want to mess around when it comes to anything that affects vision.  Chances are it's an easy fix.  I had an uncle who used to put a spot of super glue on a saggy upper eyelid, and then pinch the lid to glue a fold together.  He repeated every so often for several years until he accidentally glued his thumb to his eyelid, and then he got it fixed right with a couple of stitches.  Probably best to just do it right to begin with.

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yup  PATIENTLY waiting for return calls from referrals..   The first opthamologist thought it might be nerve related.   If I can't get a diagnosis I will talk to a plastic  surgeon I have baggy eyes and droopy eyelids, plus a few other saggy parts like you  mentioned Saul

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23 hours ago, pondmn said:

yup  PATIENTLY waiting for return calls from referrals..   The first opthamologist thought it might be nerve related.   If I can't get a diagnosis I will talk to a plastic  surgeon I have baggy eyes and droopy eyelids, plus a few other saggy parts like you  mentioned Saul

Yeah, but you said this started happening about 5 months ago....if it's neurological, you might get plastic surgery and still have the problem....you might need to see a neurologist instead of the eye doc or plastic surgeon....

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Up date on Pondmn, he is going to have eyelid surgery on the 3rd of Oct. both eyes, and waiting for test to come back to see if he does have Myathisa Gravis. . So if you pray pray for him, that Gravis is not curable, but is treatable. Grubstake

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Had an Aunt that was diagnosed with Bells Palsy she had an eye problem as you described.
Good luck with finding answers, I'm sick of these quacks myself.

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He;s got a good DR. and he likes him, that makes a big difference. Grubstake

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Your prayers are appreciated.   I go on the fourth to schedule eyelid surgery on both eyes and find out the results of my blood and eye tests.  I am having trouble chewing food due to weak muscles in my mouth and throat also in swollowing food,  additionally I am hoarse, have neck pain and have the eyelid problems.  These are the primary symptoms of Myathenia Gravis an auto immune condition.  It takes two to three weeks to get the blood tests back.   The eyelid problem can be partially corrected with come and go surgery.  If I have it I will probabally go to Stanford to see a  neurologist specialist for treatment.  If so I will take medication and may have the Thymus removed.  The Opthamolgist said it is a very rare disease with muscle weakness.  Not a death sentence but may restrict my future lifestyle.   Thanks to Grubstake I finally found a doctor to diagnose it after several months with I don't know answers  Again your prayers are appreciated.......

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Praying for you Pondmn.  Good things can happen to those who believe.   :thumbsupanim

   Old Tom 

Edited by Old Tom
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Best wishes for you, keep us updated.

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You will be in my thoughts and prayers for a good outcome.

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Hope everything  works out for you. Good luck.

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