Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums
ArcticDave

Camp oven Chile Verde

Recommended Posts

The chile harvest is upon us, and I'd thought I would share how I make chile verde.

First get your camp oven hot. A bed of coals from a campfire works great, as does a freestanding LP camp stove like mine in the pictures.

Throw in two or three tablespoons of fat. Be it oil, lard, or bacon fat. I used bacon fat here. Use what you like.

Now add in a couple of pounds of meat for a small batch, more if you're feeding a herd. Stir fry the meat till golden. Now add half an onion and a couple of gloves of garlic, all chopped. I added some mushrooms to mine because they were looking lonely in the fridge.

When everything is nicely browned, sprinkle two tablespoons of flour over it all.

Stir like he'll

When the flour is absorbed into the oil coating it all, slowly add a little water at a time continuing to stir. If you've done it right it will look like a nice light brown gravy.  It will NOT taste like gravy yet....so keep your fingers out of it! Allow to simmer in the thick gravy for a few minutes to cook the flour taste off. Now is a good time to add whatever herbs you want. I added some rosemary that I crushed, along with a bit of cumin.

Now add enough water to completely cover the mixture and simmer covered at a low boil for an hour or so.

Next add your chile. You can just chop them up and throw them in, but I like roasting and peeling them first. I had some tomatillos,  so I tossed those in too.

Cervasa por favor? Now add a bottle of your favorite malted beverage. Use good beer, if it isn't good enough to drink...don't cook with it.

Simmer covered until thick and delicious. Salt to taste and serve with a tortilla roasted on the inverted lid of your camp oven.

Heat level will be mild to wild depending on what kind of chile you used.

If you make a hot batch...make sure to share with a friend :evil1:

 

 

 

 

 

 

20180815_081710.jpg

20180815_103633.jpg

20180815_112728.jpg

20180815_130221.jpg

  • Like 6
  • Haha 1
  • Hmmmmmm 1
  • well done 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks good Dave.  :droolin:

I just might give that a try.

Thanks.  :thumbsupanim

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Damn you done gone and made me hungry!!! :droolin:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, I'll be right over...………………

   Old Tom:goodpost:

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Old Tom said:

Dave, I'll be right over...………………

   Old Tom:goodpost:

I might make a batch for the November outing if I can still get good chile by then. :)

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks absolutely awesome.

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave, buy a bunch, roast and peel then freeze...you won't know the difference....

fred

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I would change is the beer! Try it with a Yuengling Golden Pilsner, or a Shiner Premium Golden Lager. YUMMY!!!!:thumbsupanim

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, fredmason said:

Dave, buy a bunch, roast and peel then freeze...you won't know the difference....

fred

Thanks Fred! 

I was wondering if there was a way to preserve them. :thumbsupanim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's one task I never enjoy.  Roasting and Peeling.   But a man has to do what a man has to do. 

Look good Dave !

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, homefire said:

That's one task I never enjoy.  Roasting and Peeling.   But a man has to do what a man has to do. 

Look good Dave !

It is not the most fun thing to do for sure. It seems the more you blacken the skin, the easier it slips off. Sorta like pulling off a used c...nevermind :duc:

  • Haha 1
  • wow 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

Don't you guys have chile roasters over in Az? We have a half dozen on every street corner here. Like a big squirrel cage with a propane burner under it. The guy throws your whole 25 lb sack in and roasts it all in a flash. All you have to do is slip the skins off (or not) and bag them for the freezer.

Today I went to the Farmers Market. They had four chile roasters going full time and that smell was in the air thick. After the market was over I drove home and they were roasting at Albertson's and Lowe's grocery store. All the restaurants are roasting for the year so the whole town smells like chile. It is fantastic! A freaking chile smellabration!

Green chile is our life here. Red is even more important. No one EVER runs out. But if you do run out just hit Wal-Mart and get frozen Bueno brand fire roasted hot. That is medium chile from the Baquera and Franzoy farms in the Hatch valley. It does not get much better. And I know Wal Mart sells it year-round all over the Southwest. 

New Mexicans eat an average of 75lbs of green chile per year. My mother puts up six, 25 lb. bags per year (we mostly eat red chile). It goes right in the freezer with the elk. A 50# sack of pinto beans and a 50# sack of Blue Bird Flour from Estancia, New Mexico and you are set. The only other groceries you really need are corn and flour tortillas and those come fresh daily. There is no better eating on this planet and is all locally sourced.

If anyone wants Hatch green chile you can get them shipped from the Hatch Chile Connection. Ask for Jo. She is a buddy of mine. Tell her I sent you. You can order them online too. Fresh green chile is perishable and frozen is very expensive to ship but it Jo can do it!

I am in Hatch a couple times a week and I do business with the Baqueras in Arrey. This is the inner sanctum of the "Chile capital of the world" and where the very first domesticated cultivars were grown. The Baquera farm was the first commercial chile farm in the U.S.  If you like red chile (and who doesn't) I can hook you guys up. I can get pure ground red chile in bulk pretty cheap. I generally buy a 5 gallon bucket of hot and a few pounds of medicinal chile that will really make you sweat. The ground red ships easy and is not perishable so if you want a pound or two let me know. 

The guy that first took wild chile and commercialized it was a vato named Fabian Garcia. He bred the modern chile and developed the first strains in Las Cruces at the college. They were growing these first strains in Hatch before New Mexico became a State. Now Hatch only produces a small fraction of the chile sold in the U.S. Still, almost half of the chile is sold as "Hatch" chile. That is how famous our valley and our chile is! 

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Artic, put the chilis in a plastic bag until they cool, the skin should peel right off...

When I was very young I was head-chili-peeler...being young, stupid and tender I ddin't realize the hot could be transferred...I hated that job.

Now, I buy them canned...not as good, but, way easier!

Bob, you are walking library...Do you know the Wheelers from Walter Flow?

fred

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, fredmason said:

Artic, put the chilis in a plastic bag until they cool, the skin should peel right off...

When I was very young I was head-chili-peeler...being young, stupid and tender I ddin't realize the hot could be transferred...I hated that job.

Now, I buy them canned...not as good, but, way easier!

Bob, you are walking library...Do you know the Wheelers from Walter Flow?

fred

Do you man Waterflow? By Farmington?

Nope, sorry Fred. I don't know any Wheelers. I am way down on the map from Waterflow. At the other end of New Mexico.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Bob, there are pallets of Hatch chile in the Wickenburg grocery stores, but no local roasters that I'm aware of. You have to build your own roaster out here in the boonies. I might do that one day, but for now the grill works easy enough.

I have been using it in kinds of things! I feel like Bubba in Forest Gump...except with chile.

Chile verde, chile and cream cheese on crackers, chile and sausage scrambled eggs, chile and rice, chile grits, chicken and chile, grilled chile with a steak, and it makes a hamburger just frickin awesome, and I have even been thinking of making some chile jelly! :25r30wi:

Thank you for the tips Fred. I'll pick up some more and get them all roasted, peeled, and frozen so I'll have enough for a big batch of chile verde at the November outing.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dave,

I thought about buying chile by the truckload and setting up a roaster this year. You can get a nice roaster for $300. Lots of guys buy $1000 worth of chile direct from the farm and set up in some little mountain town or take it to Texas. You can sell ristras of red chile for chile caribe too.You can double your money every trip and make a trip each week. I know a couple guys that have been doing this for years and make a good seasonal living at it. 

---------

You can do a chile relleno if you have nice, meaty whole chiles. Stuff them with a slice of cheese and dip them in crepe batter. Fry them like a pancake on both sides until brown. It takes some practice to keep the cheese from running out. Once you get the hang of it you can seal them up with the batter and make a perfect relleno. Kinda like a full value jalapeno popper only less greasy. All you need is a coating of oil in the skillet. You can lay them on a baking sheet and bake them too.

The classic New Mexico burrito is a fresh tortilla smeared with mountain grown beans rolled around a hot chile relleno. That is as common as a hamburger in the Rio Grande Valley. So if you have a few nice big pods experiment with pancake batter and egg whites until you figure out your own spin on it. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Even when you buy the Roasted chili's ya have to peel the dang things.  I like the Flame / Fire thing.  LOL  That peeling is my grumble. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

What's a "chili" Homie?

Isn't that the stuff with beans in it that Texans spoon over hot dogs? I didn't know you had to peel it but it would probably be a good idea.

Edited by Bedrock Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

Bob, there are pallets of Hatch chile in the Wickenburg grocery stores, but no local roasters that I'm aware of. You have to build your own roaster out here in the boonies. I might do that one day, but for now the grill works easy enough.

I have been using it in kinds of things! I feel like Bubba in Forest Gump...except with chile.

Chile verde, chile and cream cheese on crackers, chile and sausage scrambled eggs, chile and rice, chile grits, chicken and chile, grilled chile with a steak, and it makes a hamburger just frickin awesome, and I have even been thinking of making some chile jelly! :25r30wi:

Thank you for the tips Fred. I'll pick up some more and get them all roasted, peeled, and frozen so I'll have enough for a big batch of chile verde at the November outing.

Those aren't Hatch Big Jim chili in Wickenburg Dave. That's the dregs from random fields that my primo Gilly bought cheap and has been foisting on Arizona palates for about 8 years now. Gilly lives in Hatch so I guess technically all his chili are "Hatch" - according to him anyway. He actually brought in a load of California Anaheims back in 2013 to fill his contracts. He didn't get a single complaint. :grr01:

Ranch Market in Peoria sets up a roaster every year. They will roast sweet tasteless "chili" for nearly a month. They won't roast chilis that you bring in though so you will have to live with the same swill they are selling in Wickenburg.

Chili buying hint - snap the tip off the chili and taste it in the store. If it's right there will be no doubt even if you have never tasted a proper chili before. If it doesn't *snap* move on to the next store. If it tastes like a mixture of grass and bell peppers you would be better off with something from a can.

Hatch is full of international buyers. Chili are very popular in high end restaurants worldwide. Hatch chili is seen as the standard. Those quality chili are sold at a premium and are unavailable to the casual buyer.

There are way more chili sold each year as "Hatch" chili than the Rio Grande valley could ever grow. I'll never forget the year after the chili crop failed due to too much rain at the wrong time. The growers around Hatch went to onions the next year. It was hard to even get a sack out of the few farmers still growing chili unless you had a cousin save you some. That year there were a record number of "Hatch" chili sold. :rolleyes:

You can grow your own green chili very easily in central Arizona. Avoid the plants in the store and make a trip Ochoa's farm in Mc Neil, Arizona. The Ochoas breed and grow the best chili seeds in the world. Pay the vig for the latest Big Jim variety and plant them in your garden. When harvest time comes leave a few of the best plants in the ground until the chili pods are shriveled, red and dry. Save those seeds to plant the following year and you are on your way to a chili filled life.

In New Mexico everyone grows their own chili. There are strains of chili that will make your taste buds sing. The best chili I've ever tasted came from a very small backyard garden on the river near Socorro. For you New Mexico folks - these chili were so good Lucy Newton is still mad I won't tell her where I got them. Like many backyard New Mexico gardens these chili were a genetic mishmash bred through many human generations until perfect.  You won't be finding those chili in the store.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)

That is pretty hilarious Clay. It is a small world.

I have met Dencil and know several of his progeny of course. I used to steal peaches out of his fancy orchard every time I went detecting in the Caballos. If it wasn't peaches it was his onion dump across the highway. And that sweet little private park on the river below his house used to be a favorite fishing hole of ours. I even kissed one of his daughters at a Lake Valley dance back in high school. 

The dude has a gazebo in the middle of a private pond overlooking a chile dynasty. It is all pressure irrigated now you know? He is one of the four kings of the Hatch valley for sure. 

And you are right. They truck a bazillion pounds of chile up from the Rio Grande valley in Texas and Mexico and distribute it all over. The ever shrinking crop of actual "Hatch Chile" is almost completely purchased by restaurant contracts and locals. The best New Mexican restaurants all have contracts for the real thing and keep a lot of the smaller growers busy.

Altitude makes a big difference in a chile and that is what makes New Mexico chile special. We have the highest fields in the Southwest along the Rio Grande at about 3000 ft. altitude. Most of the California chile crop is grown at or below sea level in extreme humidity and does not taste the same at all. From Las Cruces north all the way to Chimayo chile is grown in its native habitat on plots it has grown on for 600 years. So it is just better!

The next time you are down this way let me know. I'll buy you a red enchilada at B&E and we will chew the fat. 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow...they have a lot of varieties of chile Bob! Looks like a great place to order seeds. 

I have a little spot here next to the house that I have considered tilling up for a garden. Homegrown produce is the best. 

Regardless of where the local chile is sourced, it is what we have available. I make do with what I can. :)

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey ArticDave,
Just F.Y.I if it might be a little easier for you . . . when I get in a hurry to store up some more long green, like say toward the end of the season before it starts turning red on us, you might try rinsing off a few pods, then lay them flat in a gal plastic bag and nuke them for a couple of minutes of so and then turn the bag over and repeat. Another way is to moisten paper towels and layer the pods between them, then microwave as above. That way your bag won't wilt on you . . . Once they blanch, you can bag and freeze them, and they turn out very good. Nothing beats flame roasted green Chile to eat straight, but the microwave method before freezing, if you're using it for cooking and salsa etc. is still hard to beat.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

That is pretty hilarious Clay. It is a small world.

I have met Dencil and know several of his progeny of course. I used to steal peaches out of his fancy orchard every time I went detecting in the Caballos. If it wasn't peaches it was his onion dump across the highway. And that sweet little private park on the river below his house used to be a favorite fishing hole of ours. I even kissed one of his daughters at a Lake Valley dance back in high school. 

The dude has a gazebo in the middle of a private pond overlooking a chile dynasty. It is all pressure irrigated now you know? He is one of the four kings of the Hatch valley for sure. 

And you are right. They truck a bazillion pounds of chile up from the Rio Grande valley in Texas and Mexico and distribute it all over. The ever shrinking crop of actual "Hatch Chile" is almost completely purchased by restaurant contracts and locals. The best New Mexican restaurants all have contracts for the real thing and keep a lot of the smaller growers busy.

Altitude makes a big difference in a chile and that is what makes New Mexico chile special. We have the highest fields in the Southwest along the Rio Grande at about 3000 ft. altitude. Most of the California chile crop is grown at or below sea level in extreme humidity and does not taste the same at all. From Las Cruces north all the way to Chimayo chile is grown in its native habitat on plots it has grown on for 600 years. So it is just better!

The next time you are down this way let me know. I'll buy you a red enchilada at B&E and we will chew the fat. 

Yeah the B&E red is killer. I'm more of a green man but a red burro from B&E is not something I would turn down. I mourn the loss of Estella's in Las Vegas. They made the best nuclear grade pork green chili stew you could buy but only in season and only if you knew how to ask.  :inocent: After 50 years of good cross border cooking it looks like being "discovered" and rated best in the State killed a good local thing. Too much Santa Fe tends to do that.

You are a bit younger than me so I might have a different perspective but I could share the real story of how Dencil got that scar on his head. When I first heard the story from the mutual friend that gave him that beauty mark I was rolling on the ground it was so funny. Lot's of history there.

I doubt I'll make it down to Hatch during season this year. Since Bustamante passed things have changed down there. Larry is actually starting to believe he's the Mayor of Array and other nonsense going on that messes up the encantamiento ratio. I've still got lots of friend's there who need tending so a visit sooner than later is inevitable. September is always a busy time in the business and some family stuff just came up so I will probably be squeezed for time this trip. I will make time to roast and put up 50 pounds of the good stuff from Dogwolf's plot further north because a year without fine New Mexico chili isn't really something I can contemplate. I'm hoping to have time to visit my friends on the upper Pecos as well.

Are you in the Cruces area these days? We are planning an extended trip (months) visiting fiends and friends in the Dragoons in Arizona and the Burros, Gila and Caballo in New Mexico early next year.

Edited by clay

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×