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Bedrock Bob

Hunting rifles!

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There are many reasons why a novice might have problems that lead to strong tasting meat. Especially with javelina.

Brush pigs are quick and shots are close. It is easy to get a bad shot on one. It is hard to tell where to shoot one (they are all neck and head). Desert hunting is tough. It is hot and difficult to cool the meat. Things are oilier in the heat and your hands get pig stink on them. There are no trees to swing the carcass. There is a lot of bad advice about that scent gland and a lot of guys try to cut it off or mess with it. The list goes on.

Here is my method.

You do javelina EXACTLY like deer. The exact same thing that makes venison taste wonderful is what works for ____________ (fill in the blank with any game animal).

Skin it as soon as you can and don't let any hair touch the meat. Completely ignore the scent gland just like you should ignore them on a mule deer. You would never know it was there on a javelina unless someone mentioned it. The only problem you may have with it is if you try to mess with it. It is in an area that just naturally peels off easily right above the tail so just skin it and it all goes away with the skin. 

Yup they smell bad. Like strong urine. But that is all on the outside. And unless you get some of that outside on the inside it tastes great. So skinning is important.

Use disposable gloves and change them when they get fouled. Take a wet soapy rag in a ziplock and wipe the knife several times during the process. Buy those cheap WalMart game bags...they work perfect! And after you get the individual pieces of meat cut away from the carcass let it hang in the shade for a few minutes before you stuff it in your backpack... Don't seal the body heat in. Let it cool to air temps in the cheesecloth before packing it out. 

I take each leg section off the carcass as I peel the hide off. I put it in a cheesecloth tube and tie a knot between each piece of meat. Then I backstrap the carcass and bone out the neck. It all goes into cheesecloth and gets hung in the shade right there at the kill site. I leave everything in the field except the meat.

I am generally about ten minutes drive from my house so I go home and rinse the meat and scrub it with a clean scrub brush. If my shot was bad I use a five gallon bucket of clean water and twenty drops of bleach to scrub the outside surface of the meat. I put on my glasses and get every hair I got on the meat and trim off any bad areas. I usually bone the rear "quarters" and then wrap it all in butcher paper and freeze it as quick as I can.

If I am not near the house I get to the ice chest and get it cool. I scrub it with a wet rag and pick off every single hair and trim it before it goes on ice. And I never let it sit in ice water. I always keep it off the bottom of the cooler and keep the drain open so the meat does not get soaked. 

So there is my process. Maybe it will help someone or give someone an idea.

I do matanza style pit BBQ as well as in the offset BBQ grill. I grind it for sausage and my mom does a wicked javelina green chile stew that will cure swine flu! You can fry the tenderloin and sweetbreads in butter and eat them with your fingers. The front loins are so tender you will tear the meat skinning it. I have killed dozens of javelina and have never had one taste bad at all. It is excellent fare.

Here is how I do "Javelina El Chingon". 

Fry about 3 lbs of bacon in a skillet and take the bacon out. Braise the meat over the mesquite dipping it in the bacon fat until it has a nice crunchy rind on it. Work on that outer layer with heat smoke and bacon fat for about ten or fifteen minutes.  Put all the seared meat in a big roasting pan and pour in the bacon fat. Put a couple cups of water and a quarter bottle of Claude's BBQ marinade. Wrap the top in about 5-6 layers of foil. 6-8 hours in a mesquite matanza pit and then take it out. Chop it up "pulled pork" style. Take all the liquid in the roasting pan and put it in a sauce pan. Add a bunch of molasses, a handful of ground red chile, and a bunch of crushed black pepper corns. Bubble it down until the sauce is right. Pour it back over the hot meat and let it cool in the sauce until it gets room temperature. Then make tacos.

I guarantee this to be every bit as good as any meat out there. You can't stop eating this stuff. I would rather eat brush pig BBQ than elk. And I freaking love elk. 

Bob

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Thanks for all the info, I am a novice at big game.  I know where a group or herd of these guys are, pretty close to one of the places I detect...well about a mile away....

Might get a tag and see what I do....what caliber....223 or 270 ,  my 2 calibers that I have.   with the 223 I can take coyotes out to 200 so far with no problems.

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The .223 is perfect. A .22 would be plenty on most shots. You can generally get them 30 yards or so.

Go slow and look for their backs and try to see them before they see you in the brush. Shoot them in the chest or if you can on a line between the eyes and the ears.

If you spook them and they run use a rabbit squealer (coyote call) and they will turn around and run back at you. Especially if there are little shoats with them. They think you are a little one caught and squealing and the adults will turn around to defend. You can often get a second chance at a shot when they come charging back at you.

We have had them challenge us several times. If you get close and surprise them they will snap their teeth and kick rocks and act really tough with you. Those teeth are big and if you had one wounded or cornered he could probably mess you up. I have had a couple of situations that made me think about it. 

It is tough to tell a mature one form a little shoat sometimes. Look at their knees. A mature pig will have little callouses kinda like a dog's legs. A big boar will have big black leather armor on his knees. You can tell more about size and maturity sometimes by looking at their knees than the whole body. But even if you shoot a little one they are darn good table fare. 

They are easy to hunt and there are plenty of them so I think it is a hoot. And they make a few good meals! I am always surprised how much meat a javelina has on him!

I don't know when you can hunt in AZ but the season here starts in January and lasts until March. You are allowed one javelina. That means we will start shooting them just after Thanksgiving and quit about the time the fish start biting in late February. :rolleyes:

Good luck Rick!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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This ought to fit in here......

 

I have a new Browning A Bolt Medallion in 270 caliber that I've had for about 15 years and never shot.  I bought some used brass the other day for reloading.  I was sorting through them and kicking out the "non" 270s.   Came up with some that had a "bulge" in the neck.  Anyone know what was going on with those cases?270 cases.jpg

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Those look like reformed 30-06 cases. What does the head stamp say?

Lots of rounds are based on 30-06. You can make a whole lot of calibers with the 30-06 brass. .308, .243, a host of 7mm, 25-06 and a bunch of others all start with the basic 30-06 case and just shorten or necked. A .270 is just a necked down 30-06 case. MOST of the cases in the photo look like 30-06 cases that someone tried to neck to a .270. A very common sight.

Don't use old brass., You never know how brittle it is, how much it has stretched or what some idiot tried to do with it (as evidenced by the photos above). Especially brass from a reloader. And the head stamps are always different meaning VAST internal volume differences. EXAMPLE - If you load a Winchester case using load data developed in a Remington case you will have an over pressured load. You may blow out the sides of the case because Winchester brass has a much smaller case capacity.

So dump that crap and get some Lapua cases. New Winchester cases are crap nowdays and you will cull 6-8 out of every bag. Hornady cases are WAY small on the inside and no loading data works well with them. You can have a rupture very easily loading with standard data.  Starline brass is great and so is Federal, but watch the internal capacity. They are large enough so that most data will work but will produce light loads. You must work up to max and not rely on the book to tell you when it is getting too hot.

Lots of companies (like PMC and Hornady) use brass with thick sides and webs. It makes them use less powder and go faster (just like the diff between a .223 and a 5.56 is in internal case capacity. See my post above). Hornady brass is a prime example. But if you load them like a Winchester case (which most data is developed from) you will overpressure the weapon and blow the case out. By the same token if you use Winchester cases and data developed in a Remington case it will be a lot hotter in the Winchester and might blow out. The difference is vast internal capacity differences in the different brands of modern brass. 

After sizing and trimming mixed brass pass each one over a scale. You will see what I mean. Winchester brass is a bunch heavier than most brass. Remington and Federal is light. Hornady, PMC and most military brass is the heaviest. With external dimensions exactly the same this leaves only internal capacity differences. The differnce between a Remington and a Hornady case can be a 100 grains of brass. That is a whole lot smaller internal capacity and that means a BIG TIME pressure increase using the same powder charge.

Guys that reload mixed brass are always having trouble. And when they shoot they get long vertical strings indicating speed differences. This is from the varying pressures caused by varying case capacities. The vertical pattern gets more pronounced at range so estimating elevation is difficult. Reliability is affected and you get bass stuck in dies, chambers and most of all the trash bin. If you pay 50 cents per round for new brass you can get 10-13 trouble free reloadings before they start to split at the necks. If you spend $1 each for Lapua brass you can get 25 reloadings and each one weighs within one grain of the next. You will shoot MUCH better, safer and more reliably with new, well made brass.

Now, BMc can tell you all about it and post some photos of fish he caught back in the '70's. :)

Bob

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Because reloaders love a good piece of brass
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fish1.jpg

I think you are ignoring me BMc but never mind that. Here are some New Mexico trout caught in this century.

Notice how the girth of the fisherman enhances the size of the fish? Using this technique may improve your fishin' pictures in the future. 

 

There are 10 fish on the stringer. The smallest is 21 inches. The largest 24. Caught with dynamite in Lake Deming on April 20, 1946. :)

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Thanks for the info Bob.  When I first noticed those odd cases, my first thought was that they would be 30-06 cases too. But, they were 270 cases.?? Don't have them anymore to look further.

I definitely will sort the rest of the cases by manufacture after they are cleaned.  I will run a light load thru them and check them.

I have been reloading and shooting the same cases through my 243 for years. Probably reloaded them close to 10 times.    All through the same gun and same load..

But, I keep checking them.

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1 hour ago, LipCa said:

Thanks for the info Bob.  When I first noticed those odd cases, my first thought was that they would be 30-06 cases too. But, they were 270 cases.?? Don't have them anymore to look further.

I definitely will sort the rest of the cases by manufacture after they are cleaned.  I will run a light load thru them and check them.

I have been reloading and shooting the same cases through my 243 for years. Probably reloaded them close to 10 times.    All through the same gun and same load..

But, I keep checking them.

If you are full length sizing them your .243 brass will start splitting at about the 10th reloading. If you neck size you may get a few more loadings out of it. Things get thin in the shoulder from the brass moving forward. Things get thick at the neck and out of concentricity. It all gets brittle from being worked. You are nearing the end of the life cycle of your brass.

Take a good caliper and make sure you are not swelling up near the base. Compare the diameter of the web with the sidewall that is in contact with the chamber. Older brass will swell in the unsupported section of the web and thin right where the brass tapers. The diameter will be a bit larger and there will be a bright ring in the brass where it is working harder. 

Look at the necks and shoulders carefully. That will be where cracks and pinholes show as brass thins and becomes brittle. If your shoulders pinhole before the necks crack your chamber may be a bit large or you may be leaving sizing lube on the cases. Too much lube will prvent the brass from clinging to the chamber wall and evenly expanding. It will creep more on one side and pull the brass apart creating a pinhole. Either way pinholes in the shoulders are a sign of loose brass and you would benefit greatly from a neck sizer. No lube needed on the outside of the neck at all. 

Stay away from new Winchester reloading brass. I have bought dozens of bags from Sportsman's Warehouse over the last 4-5 years and EVERY BAG HAS HAD BAD BRASS IN IT. Bent necks, split necks, no necks, holes, and all sorts of abominations. I told Sportsman's about it and they still sell it. I wrote Winchester and they ignored it. You can pick any bag of that crap off the shelf and look through it and find 4-5 cases that are simply perforated or have no neck at all! So stay completely way from it!

When I had such a hard time with finding quality reloading brass I bought 100 new Lapua cases from Midway. About $1 each. They are awesome and I will never buy another brand rifle case or re-use once fired brass again. The Lapua cases are very uniform and the same capacity as a Winchester. So any loading data developed in Winchester cases can be directly translated to the Lapua case. That saves a whole lot of experimentation in developing just the right load. That equates  to a few bucks these days.

I had thousands of .243 cases I had been reloading for fourty years. It was all mixed together and no telling how many times it had been reloaded. I would try to weigh each piece to see which loads were light from trimming. But after a few years my shooting was suffering and every box of ammo I reloaded had split cases when I opened the bolt. I finally fought my inclinations to be an extremely thrifty (downright tightwad) person and shelled out for decent brass. It was well worth it IMHO.

Bob 

 

Edited by Bedrock Bob

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this may sound strange... or maybe not.  The 243s, about 7 boxes(140 rounds) have been all reloaded with a Lee hand loader kit.(you remember those? Got it in the 60's)   No resizing or trimming other than tapping case. 

Haven't lost a case yet but, like I said, I keep checking. 

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28 minutes ago, LipCa said:

this may sound strange... or maybe not.  The 243s, about 7 boxes(140 rounds) have been all reloaded with a Lee hand loader kit.(you remember those? Got it in the 60's)   No resizing or trimming other than tapping case. 

Haven't lost a case yet but, like I said, I keep checking. 

That is petty cool! Yeah, I suppose a Lee Loader would be easy on brass. As long as it was always fired out of one gun it is as good as it gets!

I think the Lee resizes the neck. Just like a "neck die" does on a regular press. That is how you get your neck tension back for the seating operation. All it takes is a little tap into a hardened ring that is the proper dimension. 

Trimming is a different story. I bet a shiny nickel those cases are way over max length. They don't grow much each shot but they do grow.

I use a Lee trimmer. Cheap and absolutely accurate. I tried every other fancy tool out there and they all suck. The Lee is fast, easy and perfectly uniform. I am certain that if you got one you would shave about 1/8" of brittle brass off the necks and probably make them last even a little longer!

Those old hand tools are awesome. I have collected several over the years. My first loading experience was with a Lee Load All and an old 30-30. I don't think I have shot that 30-30 or loaded with a Lee since. But I still have that gun and the tool. 

I still use an old RCBS "O" press and weigh every charge on a balance scale. Guys shake their head and tell me I am in the stone age with my old school stuff.

I bet you get all sorts of looks when you tell guys you load with a Lee Load All tool! That is just far out and groovy!

Bob

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Nice fish, except they look like planters bob. Look at the white mushy meat. If they are not planters, then you left them in the horse trough a few days too long . . . 

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Here's a photo of a 15 lb cat caught night fishing from the bank on 8 lb test and a night crawler.

15 LB CATFISH.PNG

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Here's a couple.....

100_0004 (3).JPG

DSC01198.JPG

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10 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

Here's a couple.....

100_0004 (3).JPG

DSC01198.JPG

Luke you should've released that one in the second photo after catching that monster in the first photo!!

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I have to load non-lead in CA next year for the 243 and probably some 270s. Haven't looked up any info yet but apparently the non-lead will be longer and have to watch the space between bullet and powder.....

 

nice fish btw

Edited by LipCa

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I guess this has turned into a hunting rifles and shooting fish in a barrel topic, it's the only thing I can relate both of these subject matter too!!

That being said this topic was started by Bob and I know that the fish being posted are getting way off topic and I don't know why some fish were posted here but I'm going to leave them at this point, BUT let's not get any further off topic by posting more fish and keep it to hunting rifles.

 

Edited by Au Seeker
Because I was mistaken on who post fish first, darn it, even I can make a mistake, I think!!
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1 hour ago, LipCa said:

I have to load non-lead in CA next year for the 243 and probably some 270s. Haven't looked up any info yet but apparently the non-lead will be longer and have to watch the space between bullet and powder.....

 

nice fish btw

I don't know what type of bullets they may be, but all copper bullets are really popular. They are much longer to get the same weight as a coper jacketed lead projectile. 

Yes, a longer bullet seated deeper into the case reduces the case volume on ignition and increases pressures. Some rounds are SUPER sensitive to seating depth (10mm auto will go BOOM if you seat them just a fraction too deep). And burning rate/density of the powder also plays into the equation. (A more dense powder leaves more room in the case and lowers pressures even if there may be more propellant there). So a drastic change in bullet dimensions will certainly affect pressures and bullet speeds.

A longer bullet also requires a tighter twist rifling. Some guys will tell you a "heavier bullet requires a tighter twist". But it is actually a "longer bullet requires a tighter twist". It is the Greenheck Theorum that tells you the correct twist of your rifling and bullet weight is not even a factor. Bullet length is. If all bullets were lead then the first statement is true. But if you are shooting copper, bismuth or monel bullets all bets are off. It is the bullet length that matters.

So it would be helpful for accuracy and bullet performance to have a tighter twist barrel when shooting longer bullets. In some rifles this is super important. In others not so much. 

I know my .243 will not shoot 100gr. bullets well. And the 105gr are not good at all. So my twist will only stabilize a bullet of that length. My .270 will shoot a 150 nicely. That is a really long rascal. I might be able to handle an even longer bullet and still get good accuracy. So it is a bit of magic exactly how long a bullet a barrel will shoot. Just keep in mind that at some point if the bullet is much longer than a lead bullet your accuracy will drop off. That may mean a tumbling bullet at range. And tumbling bullets don't expand worth a poot.

Just some food for thought. Hopefully it will help.

It is a darn shame that you can't have just a handful of lead bullets for hunting purposes. I have no quarrel with limiting the amount of lead going into the environment but regulating hunting bullets is just insane. 

 

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4 hours ago, Au Seeker said:

Luke you should've released that one in the second photo after catching that monster in the first photo!!

In this creek, we release them all.  Then we can catch them again the next year.

That little dude hopefully grew up to be like the 'big' guy.

It was funny at the time how he even got his mouth around the treble hook.

I guess I'll go take a pic of my rifle now....

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9 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

In this creek, we release them all.  Then we can catch them again the next year.

That little dude hopefully grew up to be like the 'big' guy.

It was funny at the time how he even got his mouth around the treble hook.

I guess I'll go take a pic of my rifle now....

The brown was beautiful. And a nice picture too. Thanks for posting it!

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In keeping with the original topic....

Here's some pics of my Smith Corona 1903-A3 in 30-06.

I'd like to say that I've taken big game with this rifle, but I haven't done much hunting of that kind since I purchased it.

Perhaps it 'took some game' when it was originally out in 'the field'?

20180914_185047.jpg

20180914_185026.jpg

20180914_185223 (2).jpg

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Man that is a sweet old gun. Look at that wood!

I don't think I have ever seen a Smith Corona... except for a typewriter. What the heck is up with that? I had no idea they made guns.

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I guess a lot of those '98 Mauser's were made by different manufacturing companies after WW-2, and before that probably. Very nice wood and condition!

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Beautiful gun Luke. I myself love the old wood stocks but i hate dragging them around lol. I mainly pack around my Howa .223 with the hogue stock so i dont ding it. 

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That's a beauty for sure Luke ... the wood on that gun is beautiful! She's a keeper even if you don't hunt it.

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