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Do not use magnet on meteorites


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Here's why. Sample sent to aerolite identification had no polarity, checked with compass before sending it. Noted them twice, do not use a magnet on sample. First, using a #29 professional grade neodymium magnet in the lab (the same one our hunting team uses in the field) your sample showed weak attraction. Your specimen does not exhibit fusion crust. After examination with a loupe, the piece does not show chondrules or relict chondrules.

We suggest that your samples is a form of earth rock commonly mistaken for a meteorite. One quality that these specimens have, that meteorites do not, are vesicles. Vesicles are small pinprick holes in the surface of a rock that are caused when gas escapes from cooling molten material. Report went on for two more pages about how much they do not know about meteorites. Doubt they reviewed the 224 pictures on the USB.

X-ray spectrometer analysis percent ten fall rocks. Added melting temperature.

Aluminum 3.5- 1220

Calcium .85- 1542

Iron 50.06- 2750

Magnesium 4.09- 1202

Silicon 7.56- 2570

Titanium 8.13- 3034

Carbon listed, 6332.

Pine lumber, 572

Gases listed along with water.

Have worked with metal and wood most my life, learned young to heat treat air, oil and  water hard tool steels. Use a pencil magnet when heating up the steel, when the magnet won't stick quench it. Here comes the most important part. Do not take it out of the quenching medium until you can hold it in your hand. Temper in an oven at the temp called for. For springs use molten lead.

If it wasn't for the burnt lumber these fall rocks would have never been found.

Sure glad the nickel content was higher than Steven duane curry was, or me would be in jail. His .0008, me .0011.

Fall rocks class, ilmenite mesosiderites.

IMG_20180805_182632.jpg

IMG_20180805_182925.jpg

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Here's why. Sample sent to aerolite identification had no polarity, checked with compass before sending it. Noted them twice, do not use a magnet on sample. First, using a #29 professional grade neodymium magnet in the lab (the same one our hunting team uses in the field) your sample showed weak attraction. Your specimen does not exhibit fusion crust. After examination with a loupe, the piece does not show chondrules or relict chondrules.

We suggest that your samples is a form of earth rock commonly mistaken for a meteorite. One quality that these specimens have, that meteorites do not, are vesicles. Vesicles are small pinprick holes in the surface of a rock that are caused when gas escapes from cooling molten material. Report went on for two more pages about how much they do not know about meteorites. Doubt they reviewed the 224 pictures on the USB.

X-ray spectrometer analysis percent ten fall rocks. Added melting temperature.

Aluminum 3.5- 1220

Calcium .85- 1542

Iron 50.06- 2750

Magnesium 4.09- 1202

Silicon 7.56- 2570

Titanium 8.13- 3034

Carbon listed, 6332.

Pine lumber, 572

Gases listed along with water.

Have worked with metal and wood most my life, learned young to heat treat air, oil and  water hard tool steels. Use a pencil magnet when heating up the steel, when the magnet won't stick quench it. Here comes the most important part. Do not take it out of the quenching medium until you can hold it in your hand. Temper in an oven at the temp called for. For springs use molten lead.

If it wasn't for the burnt lumber these fall rocks would have never been found.

Sure glad the nickel content was higher than Steven duane curry was, or me would be in jail. His .0008, me .0011.

Fall rocks class, ilmenite mesosiderites.

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10 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

I missed the part where they agreed it was a meteorite.

I thought we all agreed not to feed these fires? Or is this decision on a case by case basis?

We can't very well engage in a conversation like this while agreeing not to engage the Flagstone Kid. We gotta stay strong Mike and not let this type of conversation suck us into the vortex of anti-science. Either that or we engage them because we feel like banging our head on the sidewalk for no reason. 

I'm not preaching to you Mike. But if you are going to argue about meteorites causing fires with this guy I am going to go untie Jimale and play fetch with him again. :rolleyes:

 

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I'm a little confused by the juxtaposition of lab analysis of a rock and shop heat treatment of steel.  Did the lab's use of a magnet foul up your plans to heat treat your rock, or was there some other resultant damage?  Also, why are the 224 photos important, if the lab had the actual rock in possession?

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Wet/dry,

You are acting more like Steven Duane Curry all the time. Please don't list your terrestrial rocks for millions of dollars and try to sell them to anyone. If all evidence points to it being a terrestrial rock it must be a conspiracy by the IMCA or the fictional deep state!  We have wasted way too much space on this site to rehash the 'meteorite caused the Chicago fire' hoax. There are no verified examples of meteorites starting fires. It is scientifically improbable.

Please, let's agree to disagree on this point and end the discussion here. Forum members will thank you.

In the meantime keep exploring for meteorites and contribute real stuff.

billpeters

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Wet/dry,

You are acting more like Steven Duane Curry all the time. Please don't list your terrestrial rocks for millions of dollars and try to sell them to anyone. If all evidence points to it being a terrestrial rock it must be a conspiracy by the IMCA or the fictional deep state!  We have wasted way too much space on this site to rehash the 'meteorite caused the Chicago fire' hoax. There are no verified examples of meteorites starting fires. It is scientifically improbable.

Please, let's agree to disagree on this point and end the discussion here. Forum members will thank you.

In the meantime keep exploring for meteorites and contribute real stuff.

billpeters

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55 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

I'm a little confused by the juxtaposition of lab analysis of a rock and shop heat treatment of steel.  Did the lab's use of a magnet foul up your plans to heat treat your rock, or was there some other resultant damage?  Also, why are the 224 photos important, if the lab had the actual rock in possession?

NASA do not allow any magnet near their meteorites, for if they do it would change the polarity of them.

Harvey Nininger by using a compass found 190 some poles on one meteorite.

Me next stop is NASA.

At the bottom of the picture post. Truth affidavit exists.  So far no one has debuted it in over eight years. So it stands as truth.

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41 minutes ago, wet/dry washer said:

NASA do not allow any magnet near their meteorites, for if they do it would change the polarity of them.

Harvey Nininger by using a compass found 190 some poles on one meteorite.

Me next stop is NASA.

At the bottom of the picture post. Truth affidavit exists.  So far no one has debuted it in over eight years. So it stands as truth.

NASA is really going to disappoint you.

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10 minutes ago, Morlock said:

I think the largest one they've found so far is 3mm or 1/8th of an inch.

Yes, but my point was that those NASA meteorites are retrieved by a powerful magnet.  It takes a lot stronger magnet to pick an object up than it does to just check whether the object demonstrates attraction to a magnet.

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Bet they keep them separate.

Arrow points north as they lay. Compass points Southwest, aerolite magnetized it. Now it's no-good. Will send back to them. Fractured in the air is why it has no fusion crust, but yet hot enough to fuse soil to it. Other picture shows fusion crust and it to has soil fused to it on the bottom two halves.

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AYE, I got to the point awhile back , I don't know "who" to believe about "what" when it comes to Space Turds.
Ever since they killed my childhood dream an said Pluto is not a planet anymore.
That was like "cutting" the ears an tail off Mickey Mouse !

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20 minutes ago, wet/dry washer said:

Fractured in the air is why it has no fusion crust, but yet hot enough to fuse soil to it. Other picture shows fusion crust and it to has soil fused to it on the bottom two halves.

Every fresh fall has fusion crust.  There's nothing in your pictures that looks remotely like a freshly fallen fractured meteorite.

The second photo shows what I believe you are mistaking as fusion crust, but it clearly is not.  And the caliche on it is a terrestrial process.

Keep sending them to anyone who will look, eventually after you hear "no" enough times hopefully you can focus your energies elsewhere.

Edited by Mikestang
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1 hour ago, Saul R W said:

Yes, but my point was that those NASA meteorites are retrieved by a powerful magnet.  It takes a lot stronger magnet to pick an object up than it does to just check whether the object demonstrates attraction to a magnet.

Given the sizes found so far (3mm or so), are those big enough to even classify that fall?

 

 

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29 minutes ago, wet/dry washer said:

Bet they keep them separate.

Arrow points north as they lay. Compass points Southwest, aerolite magnetized it. Now it's no-good. Will send back to them. Fractured in the air is why it has no fusion crust, but yet hot enough to fuse soil to it. Other picture shows fusion crust and it to has soil fused to it on the bottom two halves.

Why not just demagnetize the dratted rock if it's bothering you, or remagnetize it so it points the way you want it to?  The only really good reason I can think of for preserving natural micropolarizations would be if you planned to donate it to a physicist for forensic analysis, in which case the rock would likely be mostly destroyed in the process, anyway, or at least converted to powder and slices and gasses.

Next time you ship, wrap the rock in a Faraday cage of sorts made up of multiple layers of foil, to protect from undue influence by postal scanning machines.  And don't use ZIP codes and bar codes, both of which enable automation.  If you force them to read the address with human eyes, your rock will suffer fewer injuries from various forms of radiation.

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Caliche melts at 2192 degrees, most of these fall rocks have no caliche on them, some ones that do are fragmented. These fall rocks are only thirteen years old.

Have found quite a few other meteorites in the area, don't pick them up, because there appearance is quite different.

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44 minutes ago, Saul R W said:

Of course.  I wouldn't bother picking up meteorites that lacked melted pine lumber, either.

The pine lumber is all ashes now, that's where we found the first fall rocks. Have over 724 pictures of these rocks as they lay, and not any of them look like the earth rocks surrounding them.

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