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Found this cool mineral in some wash, Yavapai County.

I know it's common, pretty sure I identified it once in my mineral guide but danged if I can find it again...

IMG_20180803_093331876_HDR.jpg

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I think the second one might be halotrichite.  I found a large cavity (maybe 48" in diameter, but irregular) of it in Arizona as a youngster.  It was exposed in a rockslide on the hillside a couple hundred feet above the shaft where one of my uncles had just set off a blast.  As I recall, there was azurite in the same vug.

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Nope. Not calcite. Could be a dozen other minerals though. You cant see the structure in the photo and no info is given to make an ID. So it really is anyone's guess. 

If you could tell us the hardness and show us a closeup of a crystal formation it may be just that easy. But I could not even begin to hazard a guess from only that photo.

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It's soooo incredibly fragile I hate to handle

IMG_20180803_125431256.jpg

IMG_20180803_125425865.jpg

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13 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Put  a drop of vinegar on it. If it fizzes in few minutes, it's aragonite, imho.

After looking at pics, I believe you are correct, sir.

Thank you

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15 hours ago, adam said:

Where did the Aragonite come from?

My dad says he found it in a cave in Sonora, MX many moons ago.

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I think it is Hyalite, sometimes called water opal.  It is a type of opal commonly found in Mexico in Rhyolite, a volcanic rock.  If it is Hyalite it will glow Green under a shortwave UV light.  The photo sure looks like samples I found this past winter here in southern Arizona.  If it does not exhibit fluoresces then Bob wins the prize as chalcedony.

The second photo Morlock has it nailed.  It is a classic example of Aragonite. 

These are very pieces Edge!

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31 minutes ago, Edge said:

Anyone ever polish chalcedony?

Sure. Evereyone polishses chalcedony. Chalcedony is the overarching nomenclature for almost all cryptocrystalline agates that formed from solution. 

A Mustang is to a Ford as an agate is to a chalcedony. 

Chalcedony, all of it, will take a nice polish. Even if your chalcedony is not carnelian, sard, onyx, jasper or some other variety of agate. It is all the same material and the only variation is the impurities. 

To be clear most folks call the stuff on the rock in the first picture chalcedony and they do not call an "agate" or a "jasper" chalcedony (but they are). If it is red or pink they call it carnelian. If it opaque they call it jasper. If it is in between they call it sard or onyx. But it is all chalcedony. Any high silica rock will polish and chalcedony is pure silica. 

The only other agates that are not chalcedony are petrified (agatized or opalized) organics. Petrified wood is not chalcedony but it is cryptocrystalline silica. So technically chalcedony covers all cryptocrystalline silicates except agatized or opalized organics.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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I have a piece of chalcedony recovered from a by the Hassunyumpa that I plan on cutting into something.  It started rather red, and I put it in CLR, and now its stained rust brown.  I hope this next CLR soak will get the rust brown out.  I only remember the chalcedony from pictures of being cut into Broaches from the 19th century.  I'm sure there's lots of other uses, but was going to try to make something like that or earrings.

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Most of us could recognize chalcedony on the ground just by looking at it and wouldn't give it a second thought. Fire agate is a form of chalcedony and Arizona has a few locations where it's been found. It might be wise to check any chalcedony you find to see if it's actually fire agate. I know it's been found in LSD among other areas.

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45 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Most of us could recognize chalcedony on the ground just by looking at it and wouldn't give it a second thought. Fire agate is a form of chalcedony and Arizona has a few locations where it's been found. It might be wise to check any chalcedony you find to see if it's actually fire agate. I know it's been found in LSD among other areas.

I love to polish it even if it is does not have fire. And well formed desert roses need nothing but a toothbrush.

Sometimes it formed bubbles in mud and makes nodules. Like eggs without a shell. Clear chalcedony around yolks of yellowish colored agate. The nodules are fairly common in volcanic extrusive geology and I know several spots you can collect chalcedony "eggs". They usually have a really rough cortex that takes a long time to get smooth in a tumbler, but when you do they are some very cool stones. If you cut a nice one in half it looks kinda like an agate fried egg. Most people think they are little geodes but they are not. And they often have cool banding if you slice them.

DSCN0382.JPG

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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