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What is this, ancient lake bottom?


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Cool appears to have little snail shells in it, hard to tell. Best description I could give is coral like or a really hard sponge. Could be modern material really popular hiking area but I was off the beaten path.

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Guess not scoria sinks. Sure looks like it though. It said scoria could be something like a byproduct of smelting? I’ll double check on floating cause it sure looks like the pics of scoria.

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2 hours ago, Greg L said:

How did you manage to make posting a word definition seem condescending. Well done. Your not buying the snail shell theory I take it.

I wasn't trying to be condescending, don't wear your heart on your sleeve, I posted the definition because it came really close to your own description..."coral like or a really hard sponge"...which that description though in different words than the definition I posted would fit pumice pretty well. 

3 hours ago, Greg L said:

Cool appears to have little snail shells in it, hard to tell. Best description I could give is coral like or a really hard sponge. Could be modern material really popular hiking area but I was off the beaten path.

 

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8 hours ago, d_day said:

That was my first thought as wel, mainly because of the color.

Yes, I thought so because of appearance, and also because some slags, in part6icular the glassy ones, float.  Also, I have it stuck in the back of my mind that Greg is in or not far from the Rust Belt (I could be wrong -- Ha!  All of my posts should be prefaced with that statement) -- and if he is in or near the Rust Belt, then lots of slaggy material to be had.

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An additional thought or two.  Greg, if it was ancient lake bottom (and it's not), then it would have been lake bottom specifically because it was heavier than water.  In that case, it would still be heavier than water.  If it started off as lake bottom, it would be even heavier now than it was then, because rock left underground and/or underwater becomes more compacted with time from the weight of everything above it, not less compacted.  They also become more dense because of mineral infiltration, filling in of the spaces with dissolved, infiltrating minerals over time.  Anyway, rocks and minerals don't become less dense than water unless through some cataclysmic event, like during an eruption where there is catastrophic, sudden change in temperature and change in pressure.

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I think you nailed it on this one. Wanted it to be something because of where I found it but who knows what went on there in the past. Weird how a byproduct looks so much like a natural volcanic stone but make sense in a way.

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