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chrisski

Thoughts on Claim

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On 11/24/2017 at 7:31 AM, ArcticDave said:

Anytime you see blue and greens in this area...slow down and investigate thoroughly. Keep your eyes open for parallel stringer veins. Beep in a circle around the known occurrence. You may stumble upon an unworked stringer that doesn't outcrop very well(if at all). Shy of  skinning the hillside with a Caterpillar, or a Boulderdash:evil1:...your beeper is the only way to "see" any goodies that don't outcrop well. 

I was told by an old prospector that virtually anytime you find evidence of copper in Arizona you will find gold as well. It may be in varying amounts...but it's there nonetheless. 

 

13 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

I've tried to tell folks that many times and they just won't listen. It seems they hear "copper mine" and turn away...you can't teach someone unwilling to learn I guess. 

I've traced out a lot of placers here in the LSD area and the majority end at the copper stained hardrock deposits. The copper deposits WERE the source of a lot of the gold. 

If a prospector were to look at the past production figures of say...the copper mines in Jerome. While copper does account for the bulk of the production weight wise, the gold recovered is a very significant percentage of the total mine income. I've heard from others the Bagdad and Morenci copper operations are similar. 

Take it for what it's worth...about the price of the paper this was printed on :arrowheadsmiley:

Below is a copper nugget found in the same stretch of bedrock as these gold nuggets. The wash these are from is in a area known for copper, silver, and gold deposits much like LSD. Keep in mind just like AZNuggetBob stated the gold comes from mineralized stringers. Allot of these stringers are small and many were not discovered by the old timers for example the gold from the wash these nuggets came from has no known singular source for the gold produced in the wash. Many have tried to find the source and have failed. My current belief is the gold in the wash Im currently working comes from the scattered quartz veins that cut across the wash and overtime small chunks of gold are liberated from the quartz during floods. These small stringers are not profitable for a mining company but can pay wages for people running a detector or dry washer. 

20171126_180020.jpg

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1 hour ago, Desertpilot said:

Arizona has some pretty major gold mines other than the Vulture for example:

Let me requalify that. I meant the Wickenburg Area of AZ does not have a lot of large scale commercial operations that produce gold as a primary product.  When I went to some of the mines, I was expecting more like the Lil San Domingo Mine.

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2 hours ago, Desertpilot said:

 

Below is a copper nugget found in the same stretch of bedrock as these gold nuggets. The wash these are from is in a area known for copper, silver, and gold deposits much like LSD. Keep in mind just like AZNuggetBob stated the gold comes from mineralized stringers. Allot of these stringers are small and many were not discovered by the old timers for example the gold from the wash these nuggets came from has no known singular source for the gold produced in the wash. Many have tried to find the source and have failed. My current belief is the gold in the wash Im currently working comes from the scattered quartz veins that cut across the wash and overtime small chunks of gold are liberated from the quartz during floods. These small stringers are not profitable for a mining company but can pay wages for people running a detector or dry washer. 

20171126_180020.jpg

Very good point Desertpilot. And I agree with you a 100%.
AzNuggetBob

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I think you might be underestimating your f250, unless pinstriping is your concern most backroads around the yavapai schist can be done in any 2 wheel drive pickup.  Might have to hoof it up the washes but that's part of the fun.  I didn't have 4 wheel drive until recently and went all over that area.  Now I have a yukon xl,  it's 4x4 but I never use it.  Just don't go when it's raining.  Those roads are bumpy but generally not slick when dry.

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Big thing is the amount of tires I go through.  I'm on the third set of new tires in about 25k miles.  If anyone has any recommendations on tires that won't get chewed up on a 8.5k vehicle for the type of driving we do with good sidewall protection, I'd like to hear them.  I get treads on my A/T's that get pitted and torn off, and after a few treads get pitted, I need new ones.  I changed them to M/T's that were on for 8k, A/T's for about 10k, and my current A/T's that already have treads torn.  The same tire on a smaller lighter truck last a lot longer.

I'm pretty confident in the truck not getting stuck.  If I need to get into 4WD Lo, then it's time to turn around.  There's also plenty of pin striping put on the truck from bushes and thorn trees.

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Heck, 4lo is when the fun begins! Turning around at that point is like puttin' it in and just wigglin' around a little...both parties walk away unsatisfied. :89:

In all seriousness though...what tire pressure do you run when offroad?

High(street) tire pressure has many disadvantages. Accelerated tire damage and decreased performance as well as comfort. Try lowering your tire pressure if your not already doing it.  I ran 8 in the rear and 10 in the fronts on my Jeep for desert travel.

I ran 15-18 in my 3/4 ton GMC the other day and it was a marked improvement. 

Softer tires conform to the rocky terrain and they seem to last much longer with less tread damage. :m2c:

 

 

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I would suggest that you try some Toyo Open Country A/T 'E' rated! I have 23000 on them now and they are only about half worn ... driving habits include desert schist to long distance high speed (85mph +/-) between AZ and NH/ME ... plus I haul my toyhauler(about 7000 pounds loaded) into shoddy desert locations with my Chev Silverado 2500HD with the Toyo's pumped up to about 75 psi. I switched to these tires from my old favorite BFG A/T's about 220K miles ago ... 2 trucks ago ... I would get a max of 25-30K out of the BFG's on the last set of four ... after the take-over by Michelin I think ... They changed the compound to be much softer therefore giving a better hwy ride but sucked the mileage to about half for me. Every set of the Toyo's that I have had have gone a minimum of 50K miles with little to no cutting or chunking of the tread and no damage to the sidewalls other than one that took a very sharp shard of slate back in Maine in the North Maine Woods deer hunting! And lastly I don't wait for the wear bar to show on my tires ... I replace well before that shows and by doing so probably give up another 10K miles but gives me peace of mind going solo into deep desert locations and long distance drives back east. May I also recommend going to Sun Valley Tire and Auto in Prescott Valley ... Talk to Don Otto(shop owner) and tell him I sent you to talk to him about the Toyo Open Country A/T E rated(10 ply). And finally if you are a Vet you get a discounted price.

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12 minutes ago, ArcticDave said:

I ran 15-18 in my 3/4 ton GMC the other day and it was a marked improvement. 

I don't lower to that level in my Chev 2500HD but lowering from street pressure definitely helps ... I go to about 25 psi for a minimum. Normal street pressure for me not towing the toy hauler is 55 rear and 50 front ... Chevy recommends 65 front  and 70 rear ... too rough for my taste as my truck is heavily sprung with the added stiffer Bilstein HD shocks instead of the manufacture's standard Rancheros. 

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I tried it as an experiment Mike. I have BFG AT's and they held up fine. I was running empty and was easy on the skinny pedal. The ride quality difference between 25psi and 15 was huge. After running low pressures in the jeep, I wanted to see how low I could go without rolling a tire off the wheel. 

The above is for off road only of course, running that low on blacktop would kill your tires in short order. 

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I hear ya on the F-250 + tires thing, Chrisski.. Couldn't keep tires on mine either.. 2WD + almost 100% paved road driving on the Michelins = mayybeee 20K a set, and at still over $700 with discounts & rebates I was not a particularly happy camper.. Plus the last couple sets started having nasty dry rot problems -- so yeah, something had changed in the compound formula as well..

Don't get me wrong: The F-250 is a real right truck, given the proper circumstances -- that being it's making $$s for you.. But as a non-working daily driver..? No way..! Between the crappy mpg & what they do to tires it's worse than two teenagers who expect "appropriate allowances..!"

Finally gave it away last year (as in sold it for wayyy less than low book) to the first person who came along with at least a few Franklin's in his stack.. Have already made that back plus plus on the non-ins premium alone..

Sometimes I miss not having it, like a couple months ago when the 'hood was prepping for Irma: many sheets of 4x8 were needed but we were down to only one person willing to haul them cos the Titan owners didn't want to get their bed liners scratched up, d'ohh..! But situations like that were about it; hardly a reason to keep a vehicle that performs best as a daily work horse sitting around rotting and otherwise falling apart..

Swamp

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How do you inflate the tires before you drive home?  I don't want to save my tires from the rocks, but ruin them from being underinflated on the 40 mile drive home.

I have never actually considered deflating the tires before in the gold field.  I am curious how far you actually drive on hardtop for the 15 to 25 PSI?  I have a 40 mile drive to the gold fields, and maybe a ten mile drive to the gas station, if the tire inflator is working there.  Next tire inflation station is my house.  I have a six gallon compressor at the house, but to take that to the field I'd need to add my gas generator, but now I've got half my bed filled up.  I looked at Wal Mart tire inflators, but the 12 VDC cigarette inserts are for topping off tires, inflating tires with a handheld plug in compressor can take upwards of an hour.  The six gallon or two gallon air compressors are an option as an add on, but pricey.

I have always kept both tires at 65 PSI as per the owners manual whether towing a fifth wheel or slick.  I have a air compressor for the airbags, but there's no way that tiny thing will fill a tire.  I also just added the Bilsteen 5100s when I found out the manufactured installed Rancheros were shot.  I notice a slight difference in the ride, my wife doesn't.  Could be because I installed them myself.

Edited by chrisski

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I use a on board air compressor made by ARB. http://store.arbusa.com/ARB-On-Board-High-Performance-12-Volt-Air-Compressor-CKMA12-P3572.aspx

But any 12v air compressor will do. Check Wal Mart.

Weird my prospecting rig is also my daily driver and I've had no issue with my BF Goodrich All Terrains and driving to my claims require 4x4 low to crawl over the rocks most of them being sharp. 

DP

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Also something else I have always carried besides a 12v compressor is a tire plug kit. It will get you out of there and to a tire repair without even having to change your tire. if it's a small hole plug it, pump it, drive it away. AzNuggetBob

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16 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

tire plug kit

Great advise. I had to use mine just last month. Picked up a small bolt while out at the claims. It can save your bacon for sure. The shoes on my mule are getten thin.

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This is a picture of the chunks coming out of my tires by the San Domingo Wash.  They started appearing from the first time off road.  Destination A/Ts inflated to 65 PSI.

I don't think its from the access roads along the wash, and not from the side roads, like the windmill road, but the rough, rocky overgrown roads. I probably have less than 100 miles prospecting on these tires.  The tire shop says these are still good to go.

For when the M/Ts were on there, their was a couple of the nubs were literally torn off and you could see the white layer underneath the rubber.

Maybe deflating would work.

I will need to pick a patch kit up.  The only problem I had out there was a blow out, where inches of the tire tore.

The onboard compressor seems like a good idea.  Would also be good for towing the RV and inflating the RV tires.  Did you get a tank with it, or just the compressor?

CAM00721.jpg

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That damage is because of the high tire pressure. Lower pressure will help extend the life of your tires a lot. 

You will have to carry a compressor to air back up. I use a Slime compressor I bought from walmart years ago. Still filling tires no problem. Takes about 7-8 minutes a tire. Let it cool a minute before each tire. The ARB compressor Desertpilot linked is a fantastic compressor for the money. Another option and one I'll be doing myself is a Powertank. It's very high pressure co2 tank. It can top off your tires several times on a single fill up. The tank can be refilled cheaply at any welding shop that handles gases. The big advantage of the powertank option is speed of inflation. Seconds vs minutes. 

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Thanks.  The truck forum I go to never had good things to say about the slime compressors.  Always said it could take too long and they'd overheat between fillings. A lot of those guys had large tires on a lift, or would use them to fill tires after a tractor pull.  I just have the stock sized tires.  Not trying to turn heads with my truck, except maybe someone thinking it needs to go in a car wash.

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They are rather light duty and need to kept from overheating, but they beat a poke in the eye with a sharp stick. 

Tip: cut off the dang cigarette lighter adapter splice on some battery clamps to hook it directly to the battery. Seems to help them last longer. 

Edited by ArcticDave
Added stuff
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2 hours ago, chrisski said:

 

CAM00721.jpg

I have a 'new' tire that has a piece missing like pictured here.  I know it was from a steep incline where I got a little impatient and the truck bounced a little which allowed the tire to spin and the jagged schist took off the whole tread block clean like it had never been there.  :idunno:

I run BFG AT KO tires.  I have a Tacoma which is a 'light' truck.  I don't deflate my tires and keep the pressure at 35psi.  My last set went 45k miles and would have gone another 5k but I scored a deal on Craigslist for a set of less than 5k mile tires and wheels to a newer Tacoma for $500.

I suspect that the weight of your truck is one of the issues regarding your accelerated tire wear.  A friend of mine has an F250 and is always complaining about having to put new tires on and how fast they wear out.  His truck doesn't see the dirt near as often as mine does.

One thing I always do is shift to 4H as soon as my tires leave the pavement.  I get all four tires working together and try to reduce wheel spin as much as possible.

Good Luck out there.  I'm 'rooting' for you and your quest for that elusive yellow metal.

Luke

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You can buy an air tank for pretty cheap and fill up at home and take it with you .   Or just run an at a happy medium, 30 to 35 psi and take it easy on the trails. You'll have a smoother ride home too.

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2 hours ago, Ahorton10 said:

You can buy an air tank for pretty cheap and fill up at home and take it with you .   Or just run an at a happy medium, 30 to 35 psi and take it easy on the trails. You'll have a smoother ride home too.

While an air tank may be OK for airing up one flat tire to a degree that it will support the vehicle so you can somewhat drive it, it will not work for 4, an air tank will hold maybe 2 to 3 times the air pressure in the average tire, it's much smaller than one tire's volume, so if the tire is 3 times the volume of the tank that can hold 3 times the pressure that's in one tire...BUT the best it will do is equalize the pressure in the tire to what is left in the tank, so if you have 120 PSI in the tank, divide that by the 3 times the tire is bigger equals 40 PSI, divide that by 2 when the tank and the tire pressure equalizes and you end up with only 20 PSI in the tire, a regular air tank may work well for a couple of small ATV tires, but for a full size vehicle a CO2 tank as mentioned by Dave is the way to go when needing air for all 4 tires.

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Or just buy a good little compressor. I keep a old Colman 12v compressor .  These are better.        https://express.google.com/product/3003948916229251393_10180081046285524181_8175035

 

Edited by homefire
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In the old days before small compressors and such I used to air up my spare to around 100 lbs. or more.  I always and still do carry an air hose with a chuck on both ends to get from one tire to another.  It got me out a couple of times and didn't have to change tires until a gas station was in sight.  I remember young Tom saying "The tire is going flat daddy, aren't you going to change it"?  I told him that we had plenty of air to get out to safety.  

I got the idea from when I worked on telephone cables that were under pressure to keep moisture from infiltrating the paper insulation  on the wires.  If there was a leak in the lead cable I would go out where the air pressure was the lowest and solder a Schrader valve on another cable that had good pressure.  Then bolster the pressure on the defective one with a two chuck air hose to another Schrader valve on it.  I would use an air flow valve meter to trace the air flow to the leak.  

   Old Tom    

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On 11/29/2017 at 6:09 AM, ArcticDave said:

Another option and one I'll be doing myself is a Powertank.

Here is a way cheaper option than a power tank and this is what I use, I got so tired of waiting for my little ARB 12v compressor to air up my 33's from 15 psi to 35psi it took like 10 minutes a tire. The CO2 tank takes just minutes to do all four tires. This link is to a fixed 150psi CO2 tank regulator, by the fourth tire its starts to freeze up from all the CO2 flowing through but I haven't had a problem yet just make sure you wear gloves or you'll get instant frostbite. The usual adjustable CO2 regulators don't flow enough CO2 to air up a tire without freezing up quickly. Really, also you should use a hose rated for 3000psi in case the regulator fails and you get full tank pressure to the hose which can rupture. I was lucky and scored a 3000psi kegerator hose and aluminum 20lb CO2 tank from a restaurant that closed down here, I have also seen them on Craigslist for very cheap. Powertanks are hundreds of dollars and I am WAY to cheap for that!

Amazon CO2 regulator

Now I am considering doing this with nitrogen to eliminate the freezing up issue, nitro at the welding shop is cheap, its just trying to score a tank for cheap. Regulators can be had on Amazon for $60 and are adjustable and flow plenty of nitorgen. We use nitrogen at my work for refrigeration repairs, clearing condensate drains,winterizing mister systems and cleaning stuff off, I hook up a shop air nozzle gun to it and can empty an entire tank non stop with zero freeze up. I think that with the CO2 though I will get more tire fills from one tank than with the nitrogen, we'll see...

And one more thing, here is a link to a tire deflater I use, this thing is AWESOME! Makes air down go way way faster. More time to hunt for gold!

ARB tire deflater

 

Edited by Alwaysdirty
Added some info for the peeps out there
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