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When a patch gets down to  maybe I'm finding a gram for an all day hunt, its time to move on.  Its hard to fill a poke at that rate.

Eventually most the  beeps and squeaks are gone and I feel time is better spent looking for a new prospect.

But old spots are great for going back to for testing out new detectors and equipment

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I have one patch that I've hunted for years...Over time the nuggets got smaller and smaller and I finally quit hunting it and went on to other grounds...Then, one day I decided to go back but went in

What Slim quoted, I do very well every year and plan to continue to do so whether folks say places are hunted out or not. I have been at this 27 years or better now and have learned no area is ever to

The American philosopher, John Dewey, once famously said around a 120 years ago: "A problem does not exist until it is recognized as a problem."  I suppose the same could be said of a patch: A patch d

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The same type of complaints have been posted on the Aussie forums for a couple of years now.Years ago I posted some yellow on an Aussie forum and some replies remarked how we don't go for that fly S..T over here...Well now they do.More and more gold hunters every year and more prospecting ground being withdrawn.

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6 hours ago, wes said:

When a patch gets down to  maybe I'm finding a gram for an all day hunt, its time to move on.  Its hard to fill a poke at that rate.

 

Some guys would be thrilled with a gram a day. 

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18 minutes ago, Morlock said:

Some guys would be thrilled with a gram a day. 

I wouldn't be Tickled Pink but that Sure would be a Fine Day.     And I'd be hitting that location OFTEN if the circumstances allowed it.  At least that would buy gas , grunts and leave a few grains for the Poke. 

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4 hours ago, mldave said:

The same type of complaints have been posted on the Aussie forums for a couple of years now.Years ago I posted some yellow on an Aussie forum and some replies remarked how we don't go for that fly S..T over here...Well now they do.More and more gold hunters every year and more prospecting ground being withdrawn.

I've heard about the withdrawals.  Who does that?  Is it the government or what is the 'procedure?'

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I'm interested to see how it is done down there.

I can only speak to areas like the Lynx Creek mineral withdrawal area in the US that allows panning only for a few hundred acres.  The other one is the federally designated wilderness areas that are withdrawn.  I tried researching staking a claim in Australia, but only came up with , "It's different down there."  It'd be interesting to see if a continent of 24 million people wants to withdraw as much land as we do here in the US.

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22 hours ago, wes said:

When a patch gets down to  maybe I'm finding a gram for an all day hunt, its time to move on.  Its hard to fill a poke at that rate.

Eventually most the  beeps and squeaks are gone and I feel time is better spent looking for a new prospect.

But old spots are great for going back to for testing out new detectors and equipment

Exactly how I feel.  Personally, I like that my ZED will get me .03 and smaller pieces.  It's great for learning that you  *are* in the right areas.  But after learning that over and over and over again ... it's time to move on.  :th:

But I will 2nd the point Slim made.  And I'd say it was my biggest lesson in nugget shooting.  I will *always* hunt with confidence that there is a golden prize waiting for me.  If my confidence fades, I sit under a tree and have a long snack.  No use wasting my time hunting without confidence.    

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5 hours ago, mldave said:

If interested,you can browse or ask ??? at this aussie forum...http://golddetecting.4umer.net/?sid=4ff2f56973b47994a1e621bd75c21865

I've got it in my favorites.  Noticed one of the questions being asked was what does one from Australia need to do to go detecting in California.

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18 minutes ago, chrisski said:

I've got it in my favorites.  Noticed one of the questions being asked was what does one from Australia need to do to go detecting in California.

 Crikey, Kangaroos are loose in the top paddock.

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3 minutes ago, weaver hillbille said:

 Crikey, Kangaroos are loose in the top paddock.

Went on a trip once with an Aussie and a Brit.  We could never understand each other.  Three peoples separated by a common language.

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 I was looking up Aussie slang- Crikey, Kangaroos are loose in the top paddock. it means crazy( to think with all the ancient  huge gold finds they've had DunUnda, someone would want to come to  the land of fruits and nuts. I guess the mtn scenery is a draw, and the rumor(shhhhhhhhhh) is that 80% of the MOtherload is still undiscovered...)

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I got a kick out of the one Californian telling the Aussie that the poison oak dries up and not to worry about it.Totally wrong..You can get poison oak from dry twigs,leaves or people burning it.The proof was when a botanist discovered a dried poison oak leaf in a hundred year old book and did a lab test and the ingrediants were still active.I've gotten it many times myself from dry unseen leaves.

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Mitchel raises a compelling question: I've heard about the withdrawals.  Who does that?  Is it the government or what is the 'procedure?'

Compelling questions invite compelling answers.  One example involves national monuments.  Whenever the President creates a new national monument it serves as a withdrawal to further mineral entry.  This means that no new mineral claims can be located within the boundaries of the monument, although existing claims are grandfathered in for as long as they are maintained.  A corollary compelling question is: Does the creation of a national monument automatically exclude metal detecting activities?  Since one of the principle objectives of the Antiquities Act (the authority that enables presidents to unilaterally designate a national monument) is the preservation of historic sites (such as famous battle sites like Gettysburg), then most certainly unauthorized metal detecting should be prohibited.  But what about the creation of monuments that have little or no historical significance within much of its borders and purports to be created for recreational activities?  Perhaps a good argument could be made that certain forms of "casual use" activities such as small scale metal detecting should be allowed along with other recreational activities such as fishing or hunting.  After all, metal detecting is a form of HUNTING.  But instead of killing animals, its targets are inert.  I, for one, would happily pay an annual fee comparable to a fishing or hunting license for access to national recreation areas with my metaL detector.  So a final compelling question is:  Why hasn't the federal government authorized states to issue metal detecting licenses comparable to the fossicking permits in Australia or the daily fee charged in Arkansas to hunt for diamonds???  Hmmmmm????

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4 hours ago, weaver hillbille said:

. I guess the mtn scenery is a draw, and the rumor(shhhhhhhhhh) is that 80% of the MOtherload is still undiscovered...)

I've read articles that state 90% of the gold is still in the ground although most of it is probably the low grade, microscopic type you find at Carlin, Nev. The question I have is how can they reach that conclusion? Does anyone really know how much gold is  in the ground with any certainty?

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There used to be gold here but...

There still is...but what are you willing to do for it.

It's just not as abundant in the range of your set up anymore. Even the 7000 has it's limits. It all boils down to personal preference of technique and machine type AND what you are willing to do for it. After the sitting ducks are "gone" are you willing to do some placering and move some dirt and brush? Switch to a small coil or different machine? If not, then move on. Find a new spot with easier pickings and be happy. Thankfully, most detectorists are fairly lazy and just depend on their machine.... and leave lots behind ( Big ones too :4chsmu1:).This post could have been titled, "What are you willing to do to keep getting the gold" ( from the patches that don't give it up so easy anymore)?  The answer....It's a personal preference thing. Move on when your prefered "technique" doesn't produce in the amounts that you expect anymore. Simple.

As I stated earlier, I like to put on a good sized coil and cruise for patches. That is my preference. Although, I'm always pleased and, at times, very surprised what comes out of the ground when I (we) change things up on a " hunted out" patch. Sometimes the crumbs aren't.

 

Dean

Edited by Dbado1
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16 hours ago, Micro Nugget said:

Perhaps a good argument could be made that certain forms of "casual use" activities such as small scale metal detecting should be allowed along with other recreational activities such as fishing or hunting.  After all, metal detecting is a form of HUNTING.  But instead of killing animals, its targets are inert.  I, for one, would happily pay an annual fee comparable to a fishing or hunting license for access to national recreation areas with my metaL detector.  So a final compelling question is:  Why hasn't the federal government authorized states to issue metal detecting licenses comparable to the fossicking permits in Australia or the daily fee charged in Arkansas to hunt for diamonds???  Hmmmmm????

Hunting and fishing have long been imbedded in our history, culture and leisure time. Metal detecting has not. Hunting and fishing groups have lobbyists in Washington DC. Metal detector groups probably don't.

Sheer number of people hunting and fishing vastly outnumber the people metal detecting. 

The only way I see any legislation on metal detecting being introduced is if some politician (who metal detects) is elected on a national level. Even then, the chance for passage is slim.

 

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19 hours ago, mldave said:

I got a kick out of the one Californian telling the Aussie that the poison oak dries up and not to worry about it.Totally wrong..You can get poison oak from dry twigs,leaves or people burning it.The proof was when a botanist discovered a dried poison oak leaf in a hundred year old book and did a lab test and the ingrediants were still active.I've gotten it many times myself from dry unseen leaves.

When they dry up they have less oil on them,  for me at least have never been an issue especially if you wear long sleeve shirts. Of course every person has a different tolerance to poison oak, I know a few that can go right into it without having a breakout of the itches. 

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On ‎8‎/‎27‎/‎2017 at 4:46 PM, Dbado1 said:

There used to be gold here but...

There still is...but what are you willing to do for it.

It's just not as abundant in the range of your set up anymore. Even the 7000 has it's limits. It all boils down to personal preference of technique and machine type AND what you are willing to do for it. After the sitting ducks are "gone" are you willing to do some placering and move some dirt and brush? Switch to a small coil or different machine? If not, then move on. Find a new spot with easier pickings and be happy. Thankfully, most detectorists are fairly lazy and just depend on their machine.... and leave lots behind ( Big ones too :4chsmu1:).This post could have been titled, "What are you willing to do to keep getting the gold" ( from the patches that don't give it up so easy anymore)?  The answer....It's a personal preference thing. Move on when your prefered "technique" doesn't produce in the amounts that you expect anymore. Simple.

As I stated earlier, I like to put on a good sized coil and cruise for patches. That is my preference. Although, I'm always pleased and, at times, very surprised what comes out of the ground when I (we) change things up on a " hunted out" patch. Sometimes the crumbs aren't.

 

Dean

"VERY WELL PUT"  DEAN, and I couldn't agree more!!!  I especially like the part where you say:  "Thankfully", most detectorists are fairly lazy and just depend on their machine.... and leave lots behind ( Big ones too).  That is why I am Always ready and willing to share nugget spots.  Because I know for a fact that no one  is a thorough at cleaning out a spot (patch) as I am!!!  Of course "Most" are afraid to share their favorite worked-out spots for-fear that they are indeed too lazy to utilize all means to retrieve the nuggets and question themselves as to whether they really-have-indeed cleared out the spot.  So much COVETNESS.  Gary  

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