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metwerks

Slag or possible meteorite

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On 9/20/2017 at 5:50 AM, AzNuggetBob said:

Good to hear Metwerks. I had my suspicions about that rock. but it didn't look like anything I'm used to seeing.
Do you think there may be more in the area where you found it/them?
AzNuggetBob

Do you happen to know what this came back up ass by any chance? I am very curious of this guys end analysis 

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On 9/9/2017 at 10:21 AM, hardtimehermit said:

Hey Metworks, for $20 you can have a real lab test your suspects. Look up New England Met. lab and you will find the info needed. Good luck, l love me some mesosiderite!:4chsmu1:

Do you know anything about what happened with his test results. He left a lot to be answered..

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4 hours ago, Skash said:

Do you know anything about what happened with his test results. He left a lot to be answered..

The OP hasn't been back to the forum for almost a year now. 

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1 hour ago, Au Seeker said:

The OP hasn't been back to the forum for almost a year now. 

That's either a good or bad sign. That can go either way. Get bad news and why go back to the forum or get good news and it not even cross your mind to go back and let strangers know. I'll be sure not to be that guy. Haha

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I don't know what part of Michigan you live in but there is a 5 mile diameter impact crater in Calvin, Michigan. It's about 450 million years old and lies about 100 to 400 feet below ground. I wondered if your stone might be impact melt from that fall but I couldn't find any reference to such material being recovered.

 

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I am so sorry.....completely left you guys hanging. I was cleaning up my computer and found my photos on hard drive which reminded me of this forum. The test results on the small sample I sent in were negative (They did not find nickel in iron sections). I do have a follow up question.

Q1 : I sent in a really small piece (the size of a quarter) and wondering if nickel would ALWAYS be present in EVERY spec of iron?

Q2 : Does slag typically have silicate within the iron sections? What causes the long cracks you see in the iron?(See latest pics) 

 

Image2072.jpg

Image2061.jpg

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2 hours ago, metwerks said:

Q1 : I sent in a really small piece (the size of a quarter) and wondering if nickel would ALWAYS be present in EVERY spec of iron?

It's an iron nickel alloy, so yes you would expect to find nickel basically everywhere.

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I realize that I am coming to this thread a year after it has ended, but this specimen was very intriguing and I feel that there is a lesson to be learned here.

Over these past several years, since this thread started, it has only become harder, if not near impossible, to get "meteorite scientists" to even look at a find, let alone take the time to analyze one (especially if it is a rusty chunk of metal).  Recently I was approached by a finder of a "2-ton mass of iron" and asked to get it authenticated.  Long-story-short, I ended-up having to recruit a metallurgist in helping us get an ID on this strange hunk of metal.  In the process of doing the analysis, this metallurgist educated me on the science of metallography.  I still can't believe how much there is to learn about iron alloys and other man-made metals.  But my point is, the next time I think I have an iron meteorite, I will be going FIRST to a metallurgist.  And, after I amass all of the data about its composition and its metallographic structure, as well as, have the evidence that excludes it being a man-made alloy, THEN it's on to the "meteorite scientists", or whoever is the highest bidder. 

So, my suggestion is to cultivate some contacts in the field of metallurgy.  I'm not saying that it was easy for me to do, but the few that I did make contact, I found to be very approachable.  And maybe I was lucky to find a metallurgist that was self-employed, and had the best (new) analyzers.  But all I will say is  -- that in the future, when the next "Metwerks" comes along with another interesting specimen, we will be able to identify exactly what kind of metal it is, and it won't take years to find out that it wasn't a meteorite.

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