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azdigger

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After read what Bill posted  I wonder if the is my problem is not doing enough or the correct researching. I will admit the basic I do is go where others have been.

What do I need to read so I can maybe find a nugget.....

I think I need help.......................

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You and me both......

I think one of the big problems I have is I limit myself to day trips.  I live in the Phoenix valley, so I end up going where all other gold prospectors in this valley of 4 million people has been.  After that, I drive a F250 pickup where I go.  I don't mind walking once I park, but the same thing as all those other guys.  Finally, I just don't get out enough anymore.  Spend up to 70 hours a week working, so I don't feel like detecting.

Recently found a spot I was real excited about and spent 4 day trips going there only to find out that others had been there and detected there also.

I plan on keeping at it and not quitting.  I do want to go to this outing in November.

I can get a little color drywashing, but the nugget detecting still eludes me.

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I agree, I take care of my 82 yr father so I just do day trips, making plans for the outing.

I have a Polaris ranger so I can get a little farther away than just walking. And I too am making plans for the Nov. outing.

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Dig trash.....   :D   Even if your new detector says it's ferrous.

Especially if you've found a spot where others have detected and continued to return.  There is a reason they return.  :arrowheadsmiley:

If you find trash in areas like this, you can be certain that the previous people did not get all the gold.  

Trash is generally loud and gold is not (most times).  Once you get the loud sounds out of the way, it can be easier to hear the softer sounds of gold.  Plus, trash will mask a nugget and make it impossible for the detector to hear a lot of times.

Not too long ago, I found a .4g nugget under a decaying tin can that I (and others) had walked past dozens of times.  For whatever reason, I decided to move the can.  On the third piece of rusty tin being recovered, there was a softer target sound in the bottom of the hole.  It was a nugget that I had walked past for over two years.

If you're going to a club claim, there was and still is, gold there.  Are you likely to find a lunker sitting pretty and easy to hear right on the surface?  Probably not.  But I have walked into spots on club claims that were obvious that recent mining activity had taken place there.  In the past, I had been discouraged and thought that the previous miners (detectorists) got it all.  Now I know that is just not true.  Generally the more work done in an area in the past, the more gold was found there.  NO ONE GETS IT ALL.  I have proved this to myself many, many times now.

Make sure you are getting the coil into places that others have not.  People will generally follow the path of least resistance.  Recognize this, and make your own path.  Get under bushes, roll rocks, scrape away leaf litter with your foot.  If an area looks torn up from previous miners.  Take a minute and observe where it hasn't been disturbed and search in those places.  Don't just walk through the middle, swing the detector a few times and say....  "I knew there was no gold there".  I was guilty of this and I was wrong.

Last thing.....   PERSIST.   There always comes a point where a few hours have passed and you've got a handful of trash, and you're starting to smell a skunk.  Sometimes, you've got other engagements and just have to go.  If that's the case, come back another time and pick up where you left off.  But if you can stay, keep at it.  I can think of many times when I was ready to call it a day.  Forty minutes later, I'm holding the skunk buster in my hand and going home with a smile on my face.  :4chsmu1:

Good Luck !!

Luke

(here's the nugget I found under that tin can)

20170723_114525 (2).jpg

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1 hour ago, azdigger said:

After read what Bill posted  I wonder if the is my problem is not doing enough or the correct researching. I will admit the basic I do is go where others have been.

What do I need to read so I can maybe find a nugget.....

I think I need help.......................

While more research is always helpful, I don't think it is necessarily "the" answer for you in your location + considering your situation, Rick.. Given where you either can't or don't want to get into without a partner, the answer / solution I believe you seek is a combination of both spending more time in your nearby known nugget locations and hunting those areas smarter than the average detectorist is willing.. The harder it is to reach (which in this case means getting a coil over, not as in getting to the bottom of a difficult-to-access wash) the more time you want to spend going lower-&-slower.. Cos let's face it: Everyone, including yourself, has already scanned the 'paths' between the nasties dozens of times..

To find nugglets in your closer-to-home easier-to-traverse locations, you both literally and figuratively need to "get off the beaten path.." The good news is to do so may require as few as one step.. From that point forward it's merely time and patience..

Swamp

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16 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

...Make sure you are getting the coil into places that others have not.  People will generally follow the path of least resistance.  Recognize this, and make your own path.  Get under bushes, roll rocks, scrape away leaf litter with your foot.  If an area looks torn up from previous miners.  Take a minute and observe where it hasn't been disturbed and search in those places.  Don't just walk through the middle, swing the detector a few times and say....  "I knew there was no gold there".  I was guilty of this and I was wrong.

Last thing.....   PERSIST...

7 minutes ago, Swampstomper Al said:

...spending more time in your nearby known nugget locations and hunting those areas smarter than the average detectorist is willing.. The harder it is to reach (which in this case means getting a coil over, not as in getting to the bottom of a difficult-to-access wash) the more time you want to spend going lower-&-slower.. Cos let's face it: Everyone, including yourself, has already scanned the 'paths' between the nasties dozens of times..

To find nugglets in your closer-to-home easier-to-traverse locations, you both literally and figuratively need to "get off the beaten path.." The good news is to do so may require as few as one step.. From that point forward it's merely time and patience..

Swamp

Dayum son, what same brain waves, lol..??! :4chsmu1:

da Swampster

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There are quite a few areas near Kingman that have decent gold that didn't make the books Rick, but can be found mentioned in articles and online. But when limited to day trips exploring can indeed be difficult as I stay out days at a time often when following a new lead. Everyone has a method or area they like and none is wrong, but for me I like exploring for areas off the beaten path that can often pay very well, then ya got to keep quiet and work it. For me crumb chasing in old patches is still fun and when hot out it is what I do mostly, but I much prefer getting into those long forgotten areas and finding multiple nuggets. Those areas are STILL OUT THERE and there are more left than most think. This is why I say research is so important and why I spend the long hot summer setting up my Fall to Spring hunting areas in advance. Yes indeed I spend allot of time not finding gold as well, but heck I can do that at Gold Basin, LSD, or...... Anyway. I have found allot of nuggets where there has been no recorded gold production and the government only listed areas that were economically important and produced an average of 5000.00 worth of gold at 20.00 an ounce, think about that for a minute. There are hundreds of small discovery's across the Southwest never recorded and ripe for detecting that one has to do some serious study to find, but the reward can be substantial for a person with a metal detector. 

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There are thousands of places that the old-timers located.  Only some of these turned out to be economically viable -- especially a hundred or more years ago.  But what was not once economically viable in a distant yesterday may become viable (or at least casually viable) at a future time as technology changes.  I keep my eyes open for places where only minimal old-timer signs prevail.  If the only signs are, for example, a few soldered cans amongst barely distinguishable surface diggins with maybe some 100+ year old dry washer tacks and small bore cartridge casings sprinkled here or there, then I slow down and spend some focussed time scanning to determine not only if gold is present, but its shape, size and distribution as well.  I prefer to spend a few days trying to recover just a few flakes or nuggets from a low odds unclaimed area where I am the only one who seems to be aware of what potentially lies hidden in the dirt rather than repeatedly returning to a high odds place crawling with others.  I've had a few small jackpot moments so far and sooner or later I hope to have my BIG jackpot moment and the self satisfaction that comes with following one's own compass rather than following in the footsteps of the herd.  Not all research is accomplished by reading old records.  Sometimes it takes boots on the ground and a practiced eye.  As long as I am deriving pleasure from my largely solitary efforts, that is my reward.  I like to play in the big desert sand box!

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Excellent advice from the previous posters. I know it can be frustrating finding that first gold with a detector. It took me a good year before I scored my first one at a well pounded area in Quartzsite. A whopping 3 grains. When I found it I was searching really low and slow pretty much scraping the ground. It was a very faint and a soft target but repeatable. I was so disgusted of finding pan fulls of lead shot, tacks, nails and other trash. My mentor at that time Richard Doherty kept encouraging me to be persistent and I will succeed. Well he was right. My second piece came the next weekend in the Little San Domingo area, a big piece weighing 1 grain. As time went by my finds become more consistent. Like Jim Straight says in his book "Follow the Drywashers"  it really work for me. I raked and detected the piles. One day I got down into a large hole made by drywashers and detected a 18 grain nuggie in the side of it. Seems like everywhere I heard that it was worked out or pounded to death, I still scored some gold. I've hunted with many different makes and models of VLF's and and found gold with them all. Nothing large enough to write home about, but pieces that ranged from half a grain up to a few pennyweight. Enough to keep me happy... :4chsmu1:

I've stayed away from the P.I. detectors only because of the weight. Had reconstructive shoulder surgery and weight is an issue for me plus I ain't getting any younger. LOL  Makes me wonder what I would have found with one?  :idunno:

Now with this new technology that the Goldmonster brings to the table, I feel that the so called "worked out" places" is going to give up some more gold and cut down on the frustration of most hot rocks and hot ground noise. With that said a nugget hunter still has to put his boots on the ground and use the techniques mentioned in the previous posts. Good luck and score some Au.  I love to read success stories!!   :yesss:

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I've been tempted to get a little Yamaha TW200 (with those Big Wheel tires) to truck around the washes.  (4 wheelers are a little wide)  I truly think that once you've gathered gold from a few different gold areas and developed good technique (as Luke discussed), then you've got to cover a lot of ground.  Not just any ground but point of interest areas found through geological maps, google earth .. etc.

I love finding gold others have missed, but I go FREAK'N NUTS when I find AREAS others have missed.  That is truly the Gravy in my book.

TW200.JPG

Edited by Andyy
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This is what I'd like to get around:

I keep going places I shouldn't in my truck.  Also, some of the old jeep trails have worn out in patches and are now just motorcycle trails.  Sure would be nice to get something like this to take you where you want to go.

I think the advantage of a Rokon over a trailbike is built to tow a trailer, so if you find a good spot, getting gear would be easy.

Rokon-Trailbreaker-Right-Side1.jpg

Edited by chrisski
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I have been waiting for the Taurus to become available, but not yet.  May be half the price of a Rokon.

I did make it out today, and got skunked.  I went a couple of washes North of the LSD, to an area that some detectable gold has come out of in the washes a couple hundred of yards away.  There was also some gold found drywashing a couple hundred yards away also.  I looked at the weather, and thought it'd be partly cloudy all day.  The sun had burned those clouds off by 10am, and it became 95.  Headed home soon after that.

Edited by chrisski
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2 hours ago, Bill Southern said:

Were you in the red vehicle?

No.  I was in a white pick up.  I saw no other tire tracks in the wash, except for cow tracks.  Must have been raining enough recently to destroy all the tracks.  I was all alone today except for the cows and a desert fox.

I almost went up by the GPAA claim on the LSD, but went a couple miles north of there.

 

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On 7/28/2017 at 11:52 AM, Andyy said:

I've been tempted to get a little Yamaha TW200 (with those Big Wheel tires) to truck around the washes.  (4 wheelers are a little wide)  I truly think that once you've gathered gold from a few different gold areas and developed good technique (as Luke discussed), then you've got to cover a lot of ground.  Not just any ground but point of interest areas found through geological maps, google earth .. etc.

I love finding gold others have missed, but I go FREAK'N NUTS when I find AREAS others have missed.  That is truly the Gravy in my book.

TW200.JPG

Andy.............been there, done that. :) Our 20 yr old mind says YES! we can do this....our 40/50 yr old body says...what the HE** did you do to me! 

Did some single track on my XR350 last year..............its going up for sale.

And dont say "ill just go slow" cuz that doesnt happen! 

In the washes....your peddling most of the time. Had the 350 High centered a lot to the point I parked it and walked.

Tom H.

 

Edited by TomH
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LOL, Tom.  I figured that when it came to gold, you've done it all :)   But you're right, last time I rode a motorcycle I was 18!  :laught16:   Just what I need right?... dump more money into this hobby.

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On 7/28/2017 at 5:55 PM, chrisski said:

This is what I'd like to get around:

I keep going places I shouldn't in my truck.  Also, some of the old jeep trails have worn out in patches and are now just motorcycle trails.  Sure would be nice to get something like this to take you where you want to go.

I think the advantage of a Rokon over a trailbike is built to tow a trailer, so if you find a good spot, getting gear would be easy.

Rokon-Trailbreaker-Right-Side1.jpg

I had a Rokon for several years. They'll go where nothing else will, but they are hard on your back and kidneys!

Jim

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3 hours ago, TomH said:

Andy.............been there, done that. :) Our 20 yr old mind says YES! we can do this....our 40/50 yr old body says...what the HE** did you do to me! 

Did some single track on my XR350 last year..............its going up for sale.

And dont say "ill just go slow" cuz that doesnt happen! 

In the washes....your peddling most of the time. Had the 350 High centered a lot to the point I parked it and walked.

Tom H.

 

LOL, yeah I work well over 70 hours this last week and my mind kept telling me you've done this for all of your life, it won't be an issue, but now my over 60 year old body is saying...."you stupid idiot!!!:2mo5pow:"

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10 hours ago, Idaho Jim said:

I had a Rokon for several years. They'll go where nothing else will, but they are hard on your back and kidneys!

Jim

That's not what I wanted to hear.  Does look like no rear suspension.

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