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2 hours ago, Bill Southern said:

Nice and AZ has many areas seeing allot of wind erosion and looking very similar and fun to hunt.

Bill, 

You are probably used to seeing them in Az.

I tried looking for them in Oregon, but they are few and far between, even though over half the state is supposed to be high desert. Too much sand and sage.

That's probably why there have only been like 6 or 7 meteorites ever found in the state. And that includes the Great Willamette meteorite.

 

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It's not that rocks concentrate at the surface, but rather all the finer material is stripped away by wind and water.

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Also, you might note that most all of those rocks are rounded, and don't have sharp edges.  This is river-run caused by ancient river movements of the materials.  Looks like there is a clay/dried mud bank underneath,.. may have been from an ancient silt-mud-flow at one time.  Gary 

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2 hours ago, GDM/PV said:

Also, you might note that most all of those rocks are rounded, and don't have sharp edges.  This is river-run caused by ancient river movements of the materials.  Looks like there is a clay/dried mud bank underneath,.. may have been from an ancient silt-mud-flow at one time.  Gary 

There seems to be very few rocks underneath. I envision many streams over time depositing from many different rock areas off the mountain to this spot. These were mixed with a lot of sand/clay/soil.

Then the winds removed x feet of the smaller stuff off the top, with the bigger rocks concentrating at the surface as the surface moved down. This doesn't seem to me to be exactly desert pavement .

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Here's a good article 

http://articles.adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-iarticle_query?bibcode=1990Metic..25...11Z&db_key=AST&page_ind=0&plate_select=NO&data_type=GIF&type=SCREEN_GIF&classic=YES

Roosevelt County meteorites Age<16,000yrs
Fall rate:
940falls/(10^6yr-km^2)     (>10g)=
9.4g/km^2/1,000yrs=
94g/km^2/10,000yrs
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4 hours ago, Morlock said:

We have a few areas here like that around where I live that were due to past glacial activity.

Glacial deposits are a different geologic process than a desert deflation surface.  Glaciers actively transport the rocks, melt, and leave them behind.  Deflation surfaces all the rocks are there already, and weather carries the fines away.

 

Often times on these surfaces you can find ventifacts, rocks shaped by predominant wind directions over extended periods of time.  Below is a pict of one I found in the Soda Mountains on such a surface.

BartMay2013-001.jpg

Edited by Mikestang
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