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Newbie.....Is this what I hope?


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 Hello all,

 As I posted previously; this passes the magnet, tile, crust (with flow lines) and chondrites( I believe are present on the trailing edge). These pictures were taken outdoors as opposed to the first set which were taken under lighting. It weighs 39 grams. The window shows bright shiny iron. Orientation is the crust side being the bottom of the object. 

Please keep in mind my description will assume that it is a meteorite for my benefit.                        

#1.  Leading edge of bottom showing crust flow lines and thumbprints 

#2. Top showing thumbprints and flow.

#3 Bottom trailing edge with crust flow lines leading to iron chondrites

#4-7 Sorry...Crust, window and trailing edge...the rest just are just rotations of bottom side....last showing window and a good view of the chondrites gathered on the back end.

DSCN3173.JPGDSCN3172.JPGDSCN3171.JPGDSCN3178.JPGDSCN3177.JPGDSCN3175.JPGz.JPGDSCN3174.JPG

 

DSCN3176.JPG

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The only certain test is by a reputable lab...it is mostly round which would be unusual for a meteorite...usually the "thumbprints" would be obvious...but, I am just shooting an opinion to be polite.

How or why it got where you found it is anyone's guess...

I am voting for a strong maybe...get it tested...

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  Thank you Fred,

  I am sure my description contains many errors, never even thought about a meteorite in my life until I started looking online last week. Had to read a great deal of information just to get to what it may be. There are only 8 ever found in my state, having number 9 would be rather cool. As a farm boy, I know that in lower Michigan.......the clay soil eats anything in one freeze/winter cycle. Where there isn't clay, there is sand or peat. Poor conditions for a surface find, except during the winter/early spring before the ground frost thaw.

 After the holiday, I will visit one of the local natural history museums and get an "in person" inspection of it. Both are very highly regarded and I have worked with staff on past history projects. Will post any further information.

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What you should do is to search that area for more, but have a camera with white marker put a dot at the north end then pick it up. Don't use a magnet use a compass. Some meteorites have no poles. Wouldn't be worth spending the money unless you found a hundred or so. Check out oct 8 1871 great lakes meteorite shower.

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Hi there. As Fred mentioned it could be but being that round is suspect. Also, the last pic, when zoomed in appears to have what looks like small grains of a clear type of material, maybe sand or small quartz crystals, at least from the pictures and lighting. If there is any indication of that then it is not meteoritic. Also, I would have to say that it would be an iron, if it is one, based on the open window you made, but the outside has me concerned. This is why pictures are hard to tell if one is or is not a meteorite. At the very least, it has piqued our interest. 

Jay 

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Jay,

  The grains are small balls of metal, similar to welding splatter.  I can see them very well with a loupe and they are not crystalline. The camera will not focus down to that size to get a good picture of them.

                                                                I hope it helps, Rads

                                                                                                                                                      

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There was a small chipped out spot where the window is, I just ground it flat with a belt sander. It doesn't grind well so I stopped before it heated up. I don't think I should do anything further to polish it until it has been examined by someone in person. The divot appeared black inside, had no idea it would grind and show metal.  If I could get the pictures off my phone, I took pictures of the divot before grinding it down.

Sad, but true. I need my daughters help to get the pictures off my phone. Tech savvy does not appear anywhere in my resume.

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If it's iron you can have it shot with a hand-held XRF gun and if there is a significant percentage of nickel in it then that would be a good sign in your favor.

"Chondrites" are a type of meteorite, not a constituent of an iron.

Like Jay said, the round shape is suspect and it doesn't appear to have fusion crust or regmaglypts to me, but this one is at least worth doing some follow up on to see what you may (or may not) have.  Good luck.

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18 hours ago, Mikestang said:

If it's iron you can have it shot with a hand-held XRF gun and if there is a significant percentage of nickel in it then that would be a good sign in your favor.

"Chondrites" are a type of meteorite, not a constituent of an iron.

Like Jay said, the round shape is suspect and it doesn't appear to have fusion crust or regmaglypts to me, but this one is at least worth doing some follow up on to see what you may (or may not) have.  Good luck.

Chrodritic grain is probably what raddsmith is referring to, chrondritic, silicate grain found in Iron 1AB of NWA 468

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Radssmith,

The gray (metal or not) interior is typical of terrestrial, metallic rocks and not a characteristic of nearly all meteorites. Shape is wrong, but possible in some circumstances. The rock is worth a closer look by someone who studies meteorites.

Good luck.

Keep looking down. They're our there.

billpeters

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A weathered Taconite pellet is what the museum expert thinks, but they do want to test the nickel content. Would not be odd for it to be a taconite pellet, as they are used by slingshot hunters for small game because there were readily available.

We'll keep looking for agates......we do the best with those. Sitting on Lake Superior with no one around....quiet, peaceful.......looking through millions of rocks. Heaven!

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radssmith, where are you located? I'm in St. Paul and my grandparents worked at the Hibbing Taconite Company for a number of years. I also think that it is probably a taconite pellet! Keep looking, as we don't have a lot of meteorites in Minnesota!

Edited by gaustad18
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fredmason, Yes, you are correct. Meteorites don't have any say on where they fall on Earth, it's just the conditions. Most of the meteorites found in Minnesota have been strokes of massive luck.

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As a quick side note, along the shore of Lake Superior in both MN & MI one can recover gold from the black sands layer, or at least one can in certain locations.. I don't know how widespread either direction from these spots recovery is possible, or exactly where these locations are for that matter besides Muskalloge Lake State Park area, MI, but should be easy enough to find with a Google search -- if gold recovery up that way happens to strike one's fancy along with / as a break from rock hounding and meteorite discovery..

Swamp

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  • 2 weeks later...

If those round things on the outside were chondrules, it would probably be a low metamorphic grade, in which case the window would be an obvious one (I can't see any chondrules on the interior)...My guess is some sort of terrestrial build up on the exterior. 

Edited by munroney
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  • 4 weeks later...
On 5/27/2017 at 8:06 PM, radssmith said:

  Thank you Fred,

  I am sure my description contains many errors, never even thought about a meteorite in my life until I started looking online last week. Had to read a great deal of information just to get to what it may be. There are only 8 ever found in my state, having number 9 would be rather cool. As a farm boy, I know that in lower Michigan.......the clay soil eats anything in one freeze/winter cycle. Where there isn't clay, there is sand or peat. Poor conditions for a surface find, except during the winter/early spring before the ground frost thaw.

 After the holiday, I will visit one of the local natural history museums and get an "in person" inspection of it. Both are very highly regarded and I have worked with staff on past history projects. Will post any further information.

Does anybody else get the sense that this is the exact point as he stated that he has been bitten by the bug!?!? :thumbsupanim especially considering your a farm boy my friend. Now do yourself a favor, look up meteorwrongs or meteorealities and get your self familiar with the wrong stuff. Next go searching excluding what you've learned as wrongs and do the,  visual, then magnet, then file a window/observing for metal and chondrules with a magnify glass, then streak test, and finally ask these guys for their opinion including all the info you've established, looking at your photos and the window you made you have the right idea and that's how I can sense you enthusiasm, and if these boxes all check yes it's a good candidate for testing in a lab. Your options for lab testing are endless but not so much but university will do it free under their time table, and for $15 a lab in Mendon MA, will test three samples in a very short time period less than three weeks and return them all inclusive (note: read their instructions, they want thumbnail size samples, and will accept larger pieces for testing if you email them so they can decide the return shipping postage difference you'll have to pay for the larger sample. If you live in a area where it's dry large open type farmland and you enjoy the prospect of looking for and enjoying meteorites than I would suggest getting out there and looking because compared to wet forest areas you could be in a prime location. Happy hunting, and cool rock you shared.

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By the way if you really like the meteorites strongly consider buying a NWA meteorite (North West Africa) meteorite on eBay, to familiarize you self with the real deal. No reads can replace actual hands on experience and it won't break the bank if you can spare say $100 or less if you really like it. If you don't want to spend that much there is plenty of meteorites on the bay for less, but I would suggest buying whole stone, so you get the whole idea

Peace, Love, and Meteteorites.

Rocky

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