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Lorian swamp basin.


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One day as I strolled, around the lorian swamp area with my friends, I found these two suspect meteorites, at a distance of 200m apart. They were visible, with the sandy background.

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Either white crystal or calcified inclusions, rough coarse surface, definitely not a meteorite.

Leaverite.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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Where are the crystals exactly, some meteorites do contain inclusions, as long as they are no quartz,calcite etc. On the other hand, Olivine crystals, chrome-spinel ,feldspar,and pyroxene are some of the minerals  found in both terrestrial and lunar meteroites.

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Plagioclase feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite account for 98-99 percent of the crystalline material of the lunar crust anorthite.

Suggest that self-claimed experts on this forum ease-off on the new members.

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13 hours ago, wet/dry washer said:

Plagioclase feldspar, pyroxene, olivine, ilmenite account for 98-99 percent of the crystalline material of the lunar crust anorthite.

Suggest that self-claimed experts on this forum ease-off on the new members.

Dude, it's not a meteorite.  It sure af is not from the moon.  Do you know what else has all of those minerals?  The Earth's crust.  Bingo, there's your answer.

I've never seen one post of someone claiming to be an expert, please provide a quote and/or link.

Keep your conspiracy theories at home with Jimale's rock collection, or post them to your anglefire sites.

Edited by Mikestang
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2 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Dude, it's not a meteorite.  It sure af is not from the moon.  Do you know what else has all of those minerals?  The Earth's crust.  Bingo, there's your answer.

I've never seen one post of someone claiming to be an expert, please provide a quote and/or link.

Keep your conspiracy theories at home with Jimale's rock collection, or post them to your anglefire sites.

Mike

Space rock as the name suggest is a rock its neither steel nor a native metal,  what distinguishes between the two is ; namely the iron-nickel found in meteroites, and percentage ( fe2) for meteorites and (fe3) terrestrial, despite, that, iron meteroites contain, calcium- aluminum inclusion crystals and some are coarse, in texture, therefore, flow lines and chemical interaction with atmosphere and subsequent weathering, should not be a description for terrestrial rocks.

We should be at  least be accountable for what we say,  so that in future we shouldn't leave bad legacy, reputation.

No expert here,  yes, but  with our little knowledge and proper use of our intuition we can make this site wonderful.  

I wonder why my posts are rocks, while we post the same stuff, or is it coz of the metal detector that mike's are superior meteroites.

May I share with members, the rocks I recovered from the same area, then compare and reach your own judgement

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DSC00448.JPG

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50 minutes ago, Jimale said:

I wonder why my posts are rocks, while we post the same stuff, or is it coz of the metal detector that mike's are superior meteroites.

May I share with members, the rocks I recovered from the same area, then compare and reach your own judgement

 

Because your rocks are clearly, 100%, absolutely, not meteorites. Every dark rock you happen to find did not fall from space.

I post pictures of actual meteorites, there's nothing "superior" about them, excepting that they are, in fact, meteorites.  I need to post a cleaned up picture of the last one I found and then I invite you to compare it to the rocks you keep posting.  Although at this point I don't think there's any convincing you, given the numerous posts people have made offering resources and suggestions as to how to learn about meteorites and their characteristics and your insistence on posting pictures of rocks with none of those qualities..

Edited by Mikestang
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Jimale, you haven't posted any pictures of meteorites, they're just rocks. It might be hard to accept, but try to learn as much as you can from the meteorite finds made by the members on this forum, because they're the real deal. Mike also takes good photos so you should be able to see the physical characteristics of meteorites and then clearly compare them with your rocks.

Your rocks just don't show any signs of being meteorites, so stop claiming that they are.

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1 hour ago, Mikestang said:

Because your rocks are clearly, 100%, absolutely, not meteorites. Every dark rock you happen to find did not fall from space.

I post pictures of actual meteorites, there's nothing "superior" about them, excepting that they are, in fact, meteorites.  I need to post a cleaned up picture of the last one I found and then I invite you to compare it to the rocks you keep posting.  Although at this point I don't think there's any convincing you, given the numerous posts people have made offering resources and suggestions as to how to learn about meteorites and their characteristics and your insistence on posting pictures of rocks with none of those qualities..

If there is anyone who has disregarded facts and realities about meteroites, including and  pertaining to their qualities is you, and yet, you cry foul of what others post, citing discrepancies that are unfounded, with less informed, historical and scientific fact.

I wish u have studied geographical features of an arid lands,  especially,  in reference to rocks.

Cleaning meteroites is in fact a loss to the scientific community, who would have got more information from the rock, but, it's at your own discretion.

 

Mike,  I know you have been programmed to reject, denounce, belittle anything that is foreign, that is man's nature, on the contrary,- try to think outside the box- and reflect, the world is bigger than you think.

Look at this pic,  the ash, or cement cover on the rock is an indication of a fusion crust of a fresh fallen meteroite, didn't you post something similar, sometimes back. 

It's from my collection.

 

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10 minutes ago, gaustad18 said:

Jimale, you haven't posted any pictures of meteorites, they're just rocks. It might be hard to accept, but try to learn as much as you can from the meteorite finds made by the members on this forum, because they're the real deal. Mike also takes good photos so you should be able to see the physical characteristics of meteorites and then clearly compare them with your rocks.

Your rocks just don't show any signs of being meteorites, so stop claiming that they are.

Every mortal, can easily type the word rocks 

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Jimale,

Have you taken any of your rocks to a university to be studied by an actual expert ???

Do you have any documentation, whatsoever, to prove they are in fact, meteorites ???

This forum is made up of volunteers, not paid experts, and participation is purely voluntary.   

If you don't like the feedback you are getting,  perhaps you should go somewhere else to get the answer you are looking for.  Maybe you'll have to pay for it.

No one here is required to comment on your posts.  If the people who you claimed are 'self-claimed experts' did not comment, there would be no commentary.

Once again, participation is not required.  Go have an expert look at your rocks.

Since this post is composed of terrestrial rocks.  Here's one that I found.

Enjoy !!

20170402_171502_4 (2).jpg

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27 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

Jimale,

Have you taken any of your rocks to a university to be studied by an actual expert ???

Do you have any documentation, whatsoever, to prove they are in fact, meteorites ???

This forum is made up of volunteers, not paid experts, and participation is purely voluntary.   

If you don't like the feedback you are getting,  perhaps you should go somewhere else to get the answer you are looking for.  Maybe you'll have to pay for it.

No one here is required to comment on your posts.  If the people who you claimed are 'self-claimed experts' did not comment, there would be no commentary.

Once again, participation is not required.  Go have an expert look at your rocks.

Since this post is composed of terrestrial rocks.  Here's one that I found.

Enjoy !!

20170402_171502_4 (2).jpg

Looks like an old resin of the camphor family.  A fabricated work

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Here are several actual meteorites I've found in a strewnfield I discovered a while back...Cheers, Unc

Wickenburg Meteorites.jpg

WM1Cut.jpg

WM2Studio.jpg

WM4.jpg

WMNearOne Oz NugInHand.jpg

WMNearOne Oz NugStudio.jpg

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1 hour ago, Jimale said:

Looks like an old resin of the camphor family.  A fabricated work

Well if that's the case.  Someone went through a lot of effort to make it look real and then left it in a pile of other rocks with similar features.  It's got lichens and moss growing on it, so once again, quite a bit of effort to make a fake rock.

One thing for sure....  It's not a meteorite, just like your rocks.

Edited by LukeJ
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12 hours ago, Uncle Ron said:

Here are several actual meteorites I've found in a strewnfield I discovered a while back...Cheers, Unc

Wickenburg Meteorites.jpg

WM1Cut.jpg

WM2Studio.jpg

WM4.jpg

WMNearOne Oz NugInHand.jpg

WMNearOne Oz NugStudio.jpg

Hey Uncle Ron, I am definitely not a meteorite guy. I have probably thrown a lot of them in the bush next to me after I have figured out it's "just a hotrock" I dug. Ignorance on my part. The one picture with it cut, what is the shiny metal? Just curious. Nice collection. 

Dan

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Uncle Ron,

Great finds! Great pics! Its nice to get back to real meteorites once in awhile.

billpeters

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18 hours ago, Jimale said:

Cleaning meteroites is in fact a loss to the scientific community, who would have got more information from the rock, but, it's at your own discretion.

 

Mike,  I know you have been programmed to reject, denounce, belittle anything that is foreign, that is man's nature, on the contrary,- try to think outside the box- and reflect, the world is bigger than you think.

Look at this pic,  the ash, or cement cover on the rock is an indication of a fusion crust of a fresh fallen meteroite, didn't you post something similar, sometimes back. 

 

A quick rinse with isopropyl alcohol to remove the surface dust is totally harmless.  Not to mention the fact that there is little to no interest to study Franconia meteorites in the scientific community, which I find funny that you bring up because clearly you have no relations with said community.

I'm not a computer, no one has programmed me.  I've educated myself over the last 3 decades by looking at thousands of meteorites, reading every book I could find, and talking to some of the most successful meteorite hunters around, as well as some of the most prominent meteorite scientists in the USA.  I've found hundreds of meteorites myself over the last 7 years, I didn't start hunting until 2010.

I see your picture, and see what you think is fusion crust; however to someone who's seen fusion crust thousands of times it clearly is not.

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You're a Bully Mikestang through and through just because.....

"I've educated myself over the last 3 decades by looking at thousands of meteorites, reading every book I could find, and talking to some of the most successful meteorite hunters around, as well as some of the most prominent meteorite scientists in the USA" 

Does not make you the expert, to scare anyone who thinks he might have a meteorite from posting their finds. Have a little compassion. You of all people learning, what you have learned should understand the learning curve of learning.

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