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Preserved for more than half a century


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This suspect meteorite had been with my family for the past ten decades.. The 1st quarter of the century, my grandparents by then were nomads moving from a place to another searching for water and pasture. This rock was indispensable, venerated.  It was carried on the back of the camel, Owning one was a prestige, often  tribesmen, will borrow from the family during special ocassions.

What was this rock used ? merely for smoothening and sharpening weapons. The second quarter century the rock laid in our home, for the same purpose,  the interesting thing is how the rock withstood the test of time.

Have a nice day

DSC00013(1).JPG

Edited by Jimale
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My ancestors were German - Irish, also my three kids. Three of my ten grandkids are half Asian. Also great neice and great nephew half Black, neice and great nephew half Mexican.

So I can say my family cover's this beautiful planet earth.

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While serving in the Navy as a MR5 was on duty 24 hours, when in Port had no duty days. When at shore I would look for machine shops. They have our old flat belt machines running off over head line shafts running from a motor at one end of the shop. When I saw someone having trouble trueing a part in a 4-jaw Chuck I'd motion to them so I show them an easy way to do it. Then they motion for me to follow them home for dinner. Sure ate good when in Port and fantastic time's. This was in Asia.

Edited by wet/dry washer
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What a compassionate. an acomadative, just and a kind person, keep it up!  Wet/dry washer.

 

Jimale.

 

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On 4/29/2017 at 7:40 PM, Jimale said:

This suspect meteorite had been with my family for the past ten decades.. The 1st quarter of the century, my grandparents by then were nomads moving from a place to another searching for water and pasture. This rock was indispensable, venerated.  It was carried on the back of the camel, Owning one was a prestige, often  tribesmen, will borrow from the family during special ocassions.

What was this rock used ? merely for smoothening and sharpening weapons. The second quarter century the rock laid in our home, for the same purpose,  the interesting thing is how the rock withstood the test of time.

 

The family story is cool, it's neat to have heirlooms passed down the generations.

 

However, no fusion crust, no regmaglypts, shape appears to be water worn, exterior appearance does not look meteoritic, neither does the interior.

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9 hours ago, Mikestang said:

The family story is cool, it's neat to have heirlooms passed down the generations.

 

However, no fusion crust, no regmaglypts, shape appears to be water worn, exterior appearance does not look meteoritic, neither does the interior.

When u look with ill- intention u don't see anything, did ur suspect iron meteorite u once posted in space rock club had any fusion crust, even the once u post here, all lack characteristic of meteroites , either belonging to a particular club doesn't necessarily make u an expert , or working with dealers in Ramada hotel in AZ during the annual show. Just a handy guy.

For those who see, can look at the edge of the rock it has a weathered fusion crust and shock veins. Metal flakes visible.

If you listen to such elements you will never learn. You can fool some pple for sometimes, you can't fool all the pple all the time.

DSC00021.JPG

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I'm not making negative posts.  I'm not posting with ill intentions.  I'm just saying what I see, and what I see there looks absolutely nothing like a meteorite, not even a little bit.

 

The only thing making me unhappy is all the earth rocks posts in a meteorite forum.

Edited by Mikestang
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Let me preface by saying I know virtually nothing about meteorites..

With that said, plus considering the direction this comment is heading my knowledge level is a moot point not needing noted nohow, this is at least the second time in a very short period of time a newcomer to this forum has misrepresented another's statements of fact and requests for professional validations as being something other than what they very obviously are via follow-up replies that contain unfounded attacks on another's integrity while not containing any information which may help substantiate author's claim(s) of authenticity..

Can Mike be brusque..? Yes, he certainly can be.. However, that is a trait of his I, personally, just accept as a personality characteristic that shows itself when it comes to his brutally honest assessments in regard to meteorite validation and classification.. While that may rub some people the wrong way, I find no fault with the method.. It simply means he doesn't suffer fools lightly..

Since your initial posting, Jimale, I have seen one not-very-good photo of something that has the possibility of being a meteorite, zero analytical printouts and zero confirmed reports ( supplied by you ) of falls / finds in / near your location and/or locations you've purported recoveries.. The onus falls to you for provision of authentication, not to anyone / everyone here to accept your word as fact..

Swamp

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2 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

I'm not making negative posts.  I'm not posting with ill intentions.  I'm just saying what I see, and what I see there looks absolutely nothing like a meteorite, not even a little bit.

 

The only thing making me unhappy is all the earth rocks posts in a meteorite forum.

Correct,  so, when u post anything we applaud you, with congrats!  When others post,   terrestrial rocks. What a double standard!

One thing I have realised is that all photos that u have posted are not clear enough for someone to comment, its like u made others believe, that, they are unquestionably genuine, that is a preconceived mindset which I can't condone.

If what I post are terrestrial rock, then iam sure you post terrestrial metals and rocks,

If your objective is to water down, whatever is posted by others, and u remain the only authority in this forum, then you need to do better than this .

Is this a terrestrial rock!

If yes!  then we are all in the same boat.

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Jimale,

The crystalline structure, plus the lack of any meteorite characteristics, confirms the last pics are of a terrestrial rock. Your manmade, square knife sharpening stone has got a great history and should be kept in the family, but there is no fusion crust nor shock veins present. It is not a meteorite. The interior from the pics are typical terrestrial and atypical for any meteorite. It is possible that it is a naturally formed square rock rather than a worked stone. Closer inspection should be able to tell.  

I would suggest that you obtain a high powered neodymium magnet to check rocks. Remember though that magnetic terrestrial rocks are everywhere. I would also suggest that you visit the meteoritics collection of you closest natural history museum as well to build you knowledge base.

I am also looking forward to your report after you bring what you've got to a university geology department professor for examination. 

billpeters

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Using a magnet on a meteorite ruins it for scientific research. Use a compass to check polarity. That's why I tag my finds on the north end. This has been known for years, but yet all you self proclaimed experts keep using magnets.

None of the other forums on Nugget shooter's have such negative posts.

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Wet,

 

You are technically correct about magnets on meteorites. It is important for the scientific community to have pristine, original samples of new finds.  Your suggestion about using a compass is excellent. 

Thanks,

billpeters

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4 hours ago, Jimale said:

One thing I have realised is that all photos that u have posted are not clear enough for someone to comment

I only post pictures of meteorites here, I fail to see the double standard.  I applaud others who do the same.

Below was the last picture I posted, pretty darn clear.

20170411_131029.jpg

Edited by Mikestang
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1 hour ago, wet/dry washer said:

Using a magnet on a meteorite ruins it for scientific research. Use a compass to check polarity. That's why I tag my finds on the north end. This has been known for years, but yet all you self proclaimed experts keep using magnets.

None of the other forums on Nugget shooter's have such negative posts.

Yes, it is important to not expose a meteorite to a strong magnetic field if it will be studied as to its magnetic history.  Most common classifications do not study this, however.

For a quick read, apologies if you've linked this previously:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1945-5100.1999.tb01765.x/pdf

Edited by Mikestang
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5 hours ago, Swampstomper Al said:

Let me preface by saying I know virtually nothing about meteorites..

With that said, plus considering the direction this comment is heading my knowledge level is a moot point not needing noted nohow, this is at least the second time in a very short period of time a newcomer to this forum has misrepresented another's statements of fact and requests for professional validations as being something other than what they very obviously are via follow-up replies that contain unfounded attacks on another's integrity while not containing any information which may help substantiate author's claim(s) of authenticity..

Can Mike be brusque..? Yes, he certainly can be.. However, that is a trait of his I, personally, just accept as a personality characteristic that shows itself when it comes to his brutally honest assessments in regard to meteorite validation and classification.. While that may rub some people the wrong way, I find no fault with the method.. It simply means he doesn't suffer fools lightly..

Since your initial posting, Jimale, I have seen one not-very-good photo of something that has the possibility of being a meteorite, zero analytical printouts and zero confirmed reports ( supplied by you ) of falls / finds in / near your location and/or locations you've purported recoveries.. The onus falls to you for provision of authentication, not to anyone / everyone here to accept your word as fact..

Swamp

See there...   I knew someone would make a comment that sums up my thoughts. 

Thanks Swamp !!

 

 

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3 hours ago, billpeters said:

Jimale,

The crystalline structure, plus the lack of any meteorite characteristics, confirms the last pics are of a terrestrial rock. Your manmade, square knife sharpening stone has got a great history and should be kept in the family, but there is no fusion crust nor shock veins present. It is not a meteorite. The interior from the pics are typical terrestrial and atypical for any meteorite. It is possible that it is a naturally formed square rock rather than a worked stone. Closer inspection should be able to tell.  

I would suggest that you obtain a high powered neodymium magnet to check rocks. Remember though that magnetic terrestrial rocks are everywhere. I would also suggest that you visit the meteoritics collection of you closest natural history museum as well to build you knowledge base.

I am also looking forward to your report after you bring what you've got to a university geology department professor for examination. 

billpeters

billpeters.

Its giood idea for the examination, and all that stuff you are refering to, but am sure am no so green to go to a museum to learn meteorites.

On  top of my desk is a suspect meteorite, which you may or may have never seen.

Another one picked from a blue sapphire mining zone.the second one that is 

 

IMG_20170504_012425.jpg

DSC00198 - Copy.JPG

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Jimale,

Take a look at your rock(s). If it glistens like a crystal structure, ie: quartz, or has any other crystal structure at any point in the rock (not counting processed widmanstatten irons) it can’t be a meteorite. If it has layers, it can’t be a meteorite, it’s sedimentary. If it has gas bubbles in it, it can’t be a meteorite. It’s either basalt or sedimentary. If there is a thick crust on it, it can’t be a meteorite. File off a corner. It won’t diminish it’s value. If there is all bright silvery metal, it can’t be a meteorite. If it is all grey metal, it can’t be a meteorite. If it is moderately magnetic it is unlikely to be a meteorite. If there is black crust as thin as a fingernail, and crazing on the outside of the rock only which does NOT go into the rock, it might be a meteorite. If there are small silver specks visible in the filed off section, it might be meteorite. If it is extremely dense, highly magnetic and has thumb prints it might be a meteorite.

There are billions of magnetic rocks in the Kenya and the USA, none of which are meteorites. Anyone can find magnetic earth stones nearly everywhere. Just take a strong magnet and drop into sand and you will see what I mean. Check out O Richard Norton’s, “Rocks from Space” as a resource guide.

There are some rare exceptions to these rules, but the principles stand.

Keep looking down they're out there.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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15 hours ago, Jimale said:

billpeters.

Its giood idea for the examination, and all that stuff you are refering to, but am sure am no so green to go to a museum to learn meteorites.

On  top of my desk is a suspect meteorite, which you may or may have never seen.

Another one picked from a blue sapphire mining zone.the second one that is 

 

IMG_20170504_012425.jpg

DSC00198 - Copy.JPG

Compare the #1 photo above which is my suspect meteorite and this one below downloaded from the website, which is 100% meteorite. Though my photo is not clear as such , we are learning.

DSCN3322-700x524.jpg

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