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TheWumpus

Meteorite preservation provider?

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Hi guys!  I've got a Ghubara meteorite (110 g specimen, has a polished face on one side) that started oozing rust in one spot shortly after I moved to a more humid climate.  I would like to have the rust neutralized, and the meteorite re-faced (and sealed, if necessary), but haven't been able to find anyone that does these services.  I emailed Meteorlab.com and a few others that a friend recommended, but it seems none of them still offer meteorite preservation services.

Can anyone recommend someone who can rescue this meteorite for me?

Thanks!

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Clean with alcohol then spray with shellac. Shellac is the best moisture barrier of all. Also the easiest to repair.

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Shellac also traps moisture in, not a good idea.

You're best off cleaning it up and keeping it oiled, and in an enclosed container with some desiccant (not wood, wood contains moisture), but fact of life is iron rusts on planet Earth.

There's a guy on Club Space Rock who cleans up his specimens nicely, maybe you can contact Craig Moody and see if he'll help you, example of his work: http://meteorites.ning.com/forum/topics/shawnee-restoration

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Cleaning with alcohol removes moisture. Shellac is a moisture barrier. Proof, violins, furniture, and guns hundreds of years old.

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Wood contains a percentage of moisture and you don't want it to dry out so it makes sense in those instances.

Water is the enemy of iron meteorites and alcohol will not remove it all.  Meteorites are much better preserved by keeping them clean and dry, not by sealing them up.  Proof: every iron meteorite in every museum around the world, NASA, etc.

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I know James Towbin  made some beautiful sealed show pieces for his irons using his 3d printer, and showed them on facebook, he sealed them with helium I believe, said it was better than nitrogen...

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NASA uses nitrogen in their chambers.  Not to doubt James, but I wonder what he knows that they don't... maybe NASA is afraid their specimens will float away. :arrowheadsmiley:

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On 3/1/2017 at 5:29 PM, Mikestang said:

Wood contains a percentage of moisture and you don't want it to dry out so it makes sense in those instances.

Water is the enemy of iron meteorites and alcohol will not remove it all.  Meteorites are much better preserved by keeping them clean and dry, not by sealing them up.  Proof: every iron meteorite in every museum around the world, NASA, etc.

And not just any alcohol either..
Mike -- I recall us having a conversation about distrib's a couple three years ago and yours had the better price by a goodly amount.. If you don't mind sharing that info with the folks I'm sure they'd appreciate the contact..

Swamp

PS -- Can't help but wonder what a meteorite sounds like when it's talking in a high squeaky voice.. :4chsmu1:

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On Thursday, March 02, 2017 at 9:22 AM, Mikestang said:

NASA uses nitrogen in their chambers.  Not to doubt James, but I wonder what he knows that they don't... maybe NASA is afraid their specimens will float away. :arrowheadsmiley:

Hi Mike..

  I believe James used Helium, due to the molecules were larger, than Nitro, and lasted longer in a sealed champer, does not leak as much as Nitro... , and your right, it makes them lighter :)

Dave

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Both are Dry and Inert .   Argon would work too.  Just Cost I think.

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 What about using oxygen absorbers in a bottled up specimin,,,Works for food preppers to eliminate  the source of oxidation.....

You could always throw in some slightly baked(dry)  uncooked  rice in a makeshift, paper envelope, for moisture .

 

 When the SHTF, you can cook the rice and oogle your meteorites  as the bombs fall:nutty:

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On 3/3/2017 at 11:43 AM, DolanDave said:

Hi Mike..

  I believe James used Helium, due to the molecules were larger, than Nitro, and lasted longer in a sealed champer, does not leak as much as Nitro... , and your right, it makes them lighter :)

Dave

I'm pretty sure N2 is larger than He, there are more protons and neutrons in one atom of N, and nitrogen gas is diatomic whereas helium is not.  But maybe there's a reason I'm not seeing, would be interested to find out.

 

On 3/3/2017 at 9:26 AM, Swampstomper Al said:

And not just any alcohol either..
Mike -- I recall us having a conversation about distrib's a couple three years ago and yours had the better price by a goodly amount.. If you don't mind sharing that info with the folks I'm sure they'd appreciate the contact..

Swamp

PS -- Can't help but wonder what a meteorite sounds like when it's talking in a high squeaky voice.. :4chsmu1:

Yes, not just any alcohol.  The highest % isopropyl alcohol you can find, 90% is easy to find in stores but if you wan 99% you likely have to order it.  I can't recall what we discussed previously, but a little google sleuthing should find suppliers.

 

23 hours ago, weaver hillbille said:

 What about using oxygen absorbers in a bottled up specimin,,,Works for food preppers to eliminate  the source of oxidation.....

You could always throw in some slightly baked(dry)  uncooked  rice in a makeshift, paper envelope, for moisture .

 

 When the SHTF, you can cook the rice and oogle your meteorites  as the bombs fall:nutty:


Oxygen absorbents aren't as critical as a desiccant that will absorb water.  Rice works on a budget, but silica gel beads are nice and reusable.

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 YOu can't eat the Si dessicant:4chsmu1: though,  nor  exclaim,"we're having meteorice for dinner":th:

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The highest % Isopropyl Alcohol I know one can easily pick up "on the street" is usually available at janitorial supply warehouses and is generally marketed as: Isopropyl Alcohol 98% Technical Grade Industrial Solvent.. The last time I bought any was well over 10 years ago (it lasts a really long time for my purpose after cutting & combining..) At that time it was about $19/gal, which was the smallest (and likely only) size they stocked..

If you want 99%, as Mike noted you'll need to do an online search.. More specifically, I've never been able to find 99% stocked locally.. It is available though..

Swamp

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If it was my toy I would give it a week long soak in readily available Iso Alcohol 99%. Alcohol will absorb water.   Followed by a Oven bake at 250F for a hour or so. Drive Off any water laced Alcohol.   While still hot a soak in melted bee's wax to cool.  As object cools Bee's Wax will be drawn into material.  This will Buff to shine and display as desired.  You all over complicate .   LOL

The same process using acetone could be used to remove the Bee's Wax later if required. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=Rubbing+alchol&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=walmart+rubbing+alcohol&tbm=shop&*&spd=3243443787137388398

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4 hours ago, Swampstomper Al said:

 At that time it was about $19/gal, which was the smallest (and likely only) size they stocked..

If you want 99%,

 I dind't realize bulk isopropyl was so much cheaper than 190 proof( Clear Springs/ Everclear) grain alcohol, which is around $20 a liter -after you drive to AZ to get it.

 Wouldn't heat drive off water all by itself- why use the alky?

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2 hours ago, homefire said:

Followed by a Oven bake at 250F for a hour or so.

Be careful in the oven, too much heat can discolor metal and what not.  I think when I dried out specimens in the oven I used the lowest setting it had, like 150 or something.

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Something tells me 250F wouldn't be much a issue with a sky rock. 

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Built this rifle in 1978, while in Michigan. Only used jojoba oil on bore and internal parts. The rest is a coat of clear shallac.

IMG_20170307_193206.jpg

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7 hours ago, homefire said:

If it was my toy I would give it a week long soak in readily available Iso Alcohol 99%. Alcohol will absorb water.   Followed by a Oven bake at 250F for a hour or so. Drive Off any water laced Alcohol.   While still hot a soak in melted bee's wax to cool.  As object cools Bee's Wax will be drawn into material.  This will Buff to shine and display as desired.  You all over complicate .   LOL

The same process using acetone could be used to remove the Bee's Wax later if required. 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=Rubbing+alchol&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8#q=walmart+rubbing+alcohol&tbm=shop&*&spd=3243443787137388398

I agree about the bees wax and the acetone. bees wax can last even in the ground for many years and it doesn't look so shellacked. AzNuggetBob

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4 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

I agree about the bees wax and the acetone. bees wax can last even in the ground for many years and it doesn't look so shellacked. AzNuggetBob

Yep.   Looks more natural for sure.  Smells good too.

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Bees wax is good but soft, will collect dust. Shallac has a natural wax in it, dust and fine grit won't  stick to it.

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Nothing a rub with a rag can't correct.  Bee's wax hardens exposed to air. 

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Agree with you using beeswax on meteorites, but the wood on guns the wood needs the extra protection that shallac provides. They are both products by nature. Like the fact that both can be handled without worrying about harming them.

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