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Meterorite or Terrestrial?


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  • 4 weeks later...

I recommend a new method of identifying meteorites. 

Meteorite identification, the most difficult is to distinguish between stone meteorites. Because the stone meteorite and  rock exactly the same. In particular, some Achondrite meteorites, and almost no difference between the Earth's rock, but these meteorites are particularly valuable. As for the identification of iron meteorite, only need to measure the content of metal nickel can be a. This method can be searched with Google.
The current popular method of identifying meteorites is nothing more than observing the characteristics of the fusion crust, the melting shell. As well as the appearance of meteorites. If there is a possibility is meteorite, usually it is sliced,use  polarized light microscope, electron probe. But the slices, polarized light microscopy, electron probe and other high cost. So whether it is folk or the scientific community are using meteorite external features observation method. This method has great subjectivity and uncertainty. Just as use the length of the clothes and hair to judge who is a woman. Does the meteorite sector have a clear definition of the  fusion crust? If so, develop a set of computer software on it. The present situation is, entirely by the "expert" to judge, and "expert" is often based on photos. Through the appearance to determine the meteorite is already very subjective behavior, and through the photo to determine the meteorite is ridiculous. This situation will inevitably lead to fake meteorite rampant, if not use everyone recognized the objective criteria to quickly identify meteorites, must block the influx of new enthusiasts. The ultimate damage is the whole industry.

The basic principle of the method I recommend is that almost all of the new falling meteorites all contain free iron.  however the earth's rock is not contain free iron. If there is a way to quickly and cheaply detect the free iron in the rock. the rock containing the free iron is the meteorite. We use the method is: potassium thiocyanate detection of ferric ions in the method.

Place the sample (very small) in a small amount of hydrogen peroxide, for 1 minute. And then put some potassium thiocyanate, 1 minute can be observed in the red material precipitation. Please check the video file in the link. (https://youtu.be/ZUT1P2PHPSU)
The principle of this experiment is: 1. Potassium thiocyanate turn into red, there must be trivalent iron ions generated. 2. Hydrogen peroxide can only oxidize metal iron to trivalent iron ions .  hydrogen peroxide in a neutral environment, it is impossible to Two valent iron compound to ferric trivalent iron ions. So that potassium thiocyanate turn into red can only be free iron.

I suggest you do a similar experiment. Hydrogen peroxide can be bought at the pharmacy. (Price is 1 US dollars / bottle) potassium thiocyanate in any chemical laboratory or chemical stores have. (Price is $ 7 / bottle). Each experiment requires only a few  hydrogen peroxide and several potassium thiocyanate. You can use this method to identify whether the meteorite you Previously purchased is true.

My method can not tell you ,you buy the meteorite and its name is consistent, but will be able to tell you whether you buy the rock is a meteorite.

I suggest that you look at the method of identifying meteorites I have provided. As a meteorite lovers, master a fast and accurate way to identify meteorites is how good things ah.

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