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ArcticDave's Legal Eagle XL

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15 hours ago, Bedrock Bob said:

A big floppy Guatemalan farmer hat is probably out for an aviator. Unless you were using it for some extra lift. It would make quite a statement to see a guy fly by in a little home built plane wearing one.

The thought of this... had me in stitches. :25r30wi:

I have always hated hats of any kind. Finding one that fits my weirdly shaped head has always been a challenge. Mostly, I wear a bandana that I soak regularly, but it dries out too quick to be real useful.  I have to wear a hard hat at work, but I could probably squeeze a small towel or something under it. It was hot down in the pit yesterday and I just started completely soaking myself with the water hose. That felt real good. :yesss:

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I was not suggesting wearing a lifeguard straw hat while flyingboorb.XL size should fit and there's  much benefit from the shade provided to your body.

Of course, you could cut off most of that insulation you have growing up top, Samson. The hat would fit better.

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35 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Of course, you could cut off most of that insulation you have growing up top, Samson. The hat would fit better.

Mother Nature is slowly doing that for me...starting at the top! :aw-shucks:

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3 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

The thought of this... had me in stitches. :25r30wi:

I have always hated hats of any kind. Finding one that fits my weirdly shaped head has always been a challenge. Mostly, I wear a bandana that I soak regularly, but it dries out too quick to be real useful.  I have to wear a hard hat at work, but I could probably squeeze a small towel or something under it. It was hot down in the pit yesterday and I just started completely soaking myself with the water hose. That felt real good. :yesss:

I don't go outside without a hat around here.I could not last out in the wilds of New Mexico more than 6-8 hours without one. I would be feeling the effects of exposure for sure. On some days I probably wouldn't last an hour. 

On several occasions I have encountered folks who were stranded and exhausted. They generally had something wrapped around their heads. On one occasion I encountered a group around a dirt tank with a little mud in the bottom. They had got in that mud and smeared it on their heads to try and get out of the sun. In almost every case the people were extremely thirsty but their immediate concern was getting their bare heads out of the sun.

I don't know how anyone could "not wear a hat" in New Mexico. That sun is like being hit by rocks in the head after a few hours. If I was stranded in the desert and had to choose between a hat and shoes I would probably take the hat. 

Altitude has a lot to do with that. So does humidity I suppose. But in the Chihuahuan Desert most people with bare heads are going to go down fast. It is either smoking hot or freezing cold. Either way the sun is blazing and there is very little atmosphere to protect you from the rays. Depending on where you are at the ground can be super reflective. A guy without a hat is like an astronaut without a helmet.

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I need to find a straw hat. Every other hat I have tried gets too hot. I have an old sweat stained baseball hat that I wear out wheelin'. It works ok if it's wet, but offers no protection for my neck. I think a straw hat would be the way to go here. That's what TomH wears when we go beepin'.

I generally try and stay out of the sun when it's this hot. It is 110* as I write this.    

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Once you find one at the swap meet, drench  it till the fibers soften, then poke some sharpened  pencils through the dome and leave them until dry,,,. more vent holes the better.

The flattened, grassy or palm fiber hats are better than those made of round er straw fiber.

Staples ,over  wide firstaide tape  around the brim , will prolong  the  investment.

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grandpa and his two brothers on the farm in ottawa county michigan wore wool long johns and bib overall's year around with brim wool hat's. they didn't sweat, neither do me at 130 degrees in the desert. in the desert one has to wear enough clothing to keep moisture in the body instead of letting the sun evaporate it.

 

 

 

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There is something to that,keeping moisture on the body,,,and your clothing to act as a natural swamp cooler.

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12 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

There is something to that,keeping moisture on the body,,,and your clothing to act as a natural swamp cooler.

You do need some evaporation though. Maybe the key is finding the right balance of moisture retention vs evaporation. You don't want to shrivel up like a salted slug, but at the same time you can't just seal yourself up. I wear nitrile gloves while greasing heavy equipment at work and my hands are literally swimming in sweat after a few minutes. :sickbyc:

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14 hours ago, wet/dry washer said:

grandpa and his two brothers on the farm in ottawa county michigan wore wool long johns and bib overall's year around with brim wool hat's. they didn't sweat, neither do me at 130 degrees in the desert. in the desert one has to wear enough clothing to keep moisture in the body instead of letting the sun evaporate it.

 

 

 

You are quite the summer fashion trendsetter bob. Wool long johns, bib overalls and quaker hats just scream "comfort" on these hot summer days! 

No wonder you are such an animal with the ladies.

:)

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30 minutes ago, ArcticDave said:

You do need some evaporation though. Maybe the key is finding the right balance of moisture retention vs evaporation. You don't want to shrivel up like a salted slug, but at the same time you can't just seal yourself up. I wear nitrile gloves while greasing heavy equipment at work and my hands are literally swimming in sweat after a few minutes. :sickbyc:

That is spot on Dave. 

Every culture that lives in the hot climates wear layers of loose fitting light colored cotton. This protects them form the suns rays and makes the most of perspiration. And it can be wetted further if need be.

As soon as cotton material became available every native Southwestern culture started wearing it. They still do. Flour sacks made the first desert apparel and white cotton muslin is still the standard for staying comfortable in the desert. This is the universal rule on all continents in desert climates for centuries.

Without both perspiration and evaporation there is no cooling at all. Wrapped in wool insulation with no way to dissipate heat and make use of evaporation a body will suffer. 

I like the loose fitting military pants and a light colored cotton long sleeve shirt. A straw hat and a bandanna around my neck to keep sweat high up where air and blood is circulating. I like suspenders so my pants aren't bunched at the waist. That allows a little air circulation through the legs and out the top of the pants as I move. And the loose cotton shirt billows a bit with every move and pumps air to aid in evaporation and taking heat away from the body. The bandanna seals the air around the neck and forces it through the weave of the shirt and provides more cooling. Dressed like this I can stay comfortable up to about 104-105 degrees even if the humidity is high. 

The Arabs wear robes that billow and the Mexicans wear baggy shirts and pants. This is to allow a lot of movement of the fabric. The base color is always white to maximixe reflection and minimize heat absorption. Every Southwestern tribe fashioned their apparel from flour sacks and cotton fabric and wrapped their heads in layers of cotton cloth much like the middle eastern turban. Every aspect of traditional desert garb revolves around maximizing natural cooling. It is always cotton, always baggy, always light colored and always in several layers. Any choice of dry goods that incorporates these elements is suitable for the desert. It shows good outdoor sense and a knowledge of how to deal with this climate.

 

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I agree completely BB. Cotton is king and is far more comfortable to me in hot weather. While I admire wool, and would like to own a good set...no way I'm wearing it in summer. 

 

  I had a chance to work on the project today. I decided to tackle the fiberglass dash pod again. Last attempt was less than stellar, so I'm pleased to see this version coming together. I used 1" blue foam glued together with spray glue. When the final shaping is done. I'll coat the plug with a release aid and begin laying on the fiberglass.

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I completed the plug for my dash pod this morning. I also carved out an angled panel area for my flight instruments. As soon as the sealer coat cures, I can start laying up the fiberglass.

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6 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

I completed the plug for my dash pod this morning. I also carved out an angled panel area for my flight instruments. As soon as the sealer coat cures, I can start laying up the fiberglass.

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Looks great Dave!!

Huuhh was it snowing over there in Arizona or is that Parmesan cheese all over your arm??

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That's his auxiliary flotation blowing in the wind ,,, for emergency landings on Lake Pleasant:brows:

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Nevermimd, the foam is a mold only and a parachute allows emergency landing.

Derp.

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2 hours ago, Au Seeker said:

Looks great Dave!!

Huuhh was it snowing over there in Arizona or is that Parmesan cheese all over your arm??

I wish it was! Well that is exaggerating, but it would have been a nice break from 100+ degree days.:yesss: 

I tried to imagine cold blue ice...but it was too dang to hot:desertsmile:

23 minutes ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

Nevermimd, the foam is a mold only and a parachute allows emergency landing.

Derp.

Yep on the mold part...can't afford a $3000.00 parachute system though. The Captain will go down with his ship I'm afraid. :excl:

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1 hour ago, ArcticDave said:

I wish it was! Well that is exaggerating, but it would have been a nice break from 100+ degree day

I  found that 5 min epoxy has a working.time.of.about.a. minute b4 it gels up in the heat here.

I imagine you have experienced similar?

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10 hours ago, Stillweaver hillbelli said:

I  found that 5 min epoxy has a working.time.of.about.a. minute b4 it gels up in the heat here.

I imagine you have experienced similar?

I certainly have! I tried to fill some divots with bondo on that plug I just made. The stuff set so fast, it was basically unusable. I need to build the wings still, but the heat makes dealing with the epoxy too difficult. That will have to be a fall project I'm afraid. 

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What about storing product  in a fridge? 

Or as a compromise(  due to food smelling like a chemical factory) use a "breadboard"(mixing board made of 3/4" HDPE)  kept in a fridge or freezer until mixing time? Or some thick steel plate or ceramic tile...

Epoxy retarder

There may be something similar for polyester resin(bondo).

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3 hours ago, ArcticDave said:

I certainly have! I tried to fill some divots with bondo on that plug I just made. The stuff set so fast, it was basically unusable. I need to build the wings still, but the heat makes dealing with the epoxy too difficult. That will have to be a fall project I'm afraid. 

Hey Dave!

They make polyester and epoxy resins that work just fine at high temps. For polyester resins (like bondo and traditional fiberglass resin) it is just a matter of getting the right hardener (catalyst). Even plain old "Bondo" and "Kitty Hair" can be worked in temps well over 100 degrees with no problem using the proper catalyst. Professional products work a lot better and wont leave a sticky surface like the stuff you get at Wal Mart but any of it can be used at high temps with a little tweaking. 

As far as epoxies go the story is the same. Just get the product designed to be used at whatever temp you need. There is no problem working with epoxy in any heat range.

I use two part epoxy resins for sealing, filling and coating. You can get it with open times from 5 minute to 15 hour. You can use fumed silica to thicken it to whatever consistency you want. You can use powdered fillers to make it spreadable with a trowel like "Bondo". You can color it with any pigment. It will mix with oil based enamels, water based acrylics, powdered pigments and even stuff like lacquer nail polish and ladies makeup.

The very best stuff I have found in two part epoxy is "Stone Coat". I am sure the same product can be had under many trade names. It is equal part epoxy and is available in 15 minute and 4 hour open times. The system I use for reinforced shapes is boat epoxy from West Marine. It has several different catalysts that work in a wide temp range. I have used it in super hot weather and had plenty of time to work with it. You can get the same stuff in an even wider variety of viscosities and temperature ranges marketed for auto body and industrial fabrication.

Down in Mexico they use regular polyester resin and Saran Wrap. They mix the resin thin on a sheet of wrap so heat does not build up when the reaction starts. Then they slap the buttered Saran Wrap on the work and squeegee it out. The Saran Wrap keeps the humidity away from the resin and retards the set. It keeps oxygen off the surface and makes it hard and non-sticky. If you are really good and don't wrinkle the wrap it will create a perfect finish on the surface. Those guys do pretty good work in 120 degree heat with a low tech product. They just get really creative with how they mix and apply it. 

It seems like boat resin with a high temp catalyst is all you need. Or an epoxy with a standard four hour set. Maybe a little drywall mud to thicken it with to make a filler. 

 

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I've already purchased my epoxy. The plans call for a structural epoxy called T-88 by System 3...so that's what I bought. Honestly a good West systems structural epoxy would have been fine. That would have given me more choices in catalysts. Hindsight is 20/20 they say...:arrowheadsmiley:

Things are ramping up at work, so my time isn't as abundant as it once was. Right now I think I have enough fuselage and engine stuff to keep me busy until the outdoor temps moderate a bit. Then I can use the stuff I already sweated my azz off for! :)

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Fiberglass layup pictures. I have never attempted composite construction, so it is butt ugly... but it'll get the job done.

 

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Drywall installation/ finishing work is the same way- until after prime and paint...then it is beautiful.

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After a lot lot lot of sanding...paint is on the new dash pod. Total weight of dash pod and windshield is ~5 1/2 lbs with hardware included. It's not as light as I hoped... but not too bad for a first attempt. I think I'll run with it. :yesss:

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