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Scoriated vesicular rock


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7 hours ago, Shokmelt said:

The big problem with trying to figure out what kind of rock this is, without a much more sophisticated 

analysis, is that glacial deposits could easily contain a whole host of different materials that have

been transported great distances; including volcanics. Just out of curiosity, mainly for the purpose

of distinguishing between mineral staining and mineral composition, have you tested it's magnetic 

response? With a strong magnet preferably. 

I did test for magnetic response & having held it close to a magnet on a string, I can say that there was no response whatsoever.

I understand your point on the glacial transportation, but again the problem I have with that is to do with the rocks condition. Take a close look at photo no 2 on my original post - The photo on the left shows a close up of where the vesicles open out & become exposed to the exterior, you can follow some of the vesicle chambers back into the stone & the penetration is significant.

If this rock is volcanic, then at some point (>10,000 years), the rock was transported to the find location & assuming that it has been in the ground, then those vesicle chambers would be infilled, at least to some extent with debris. However this is not the case, the interior of the rock is pristine, which leads me to believe that it is recent.

 

 

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The internal structures seen in cross section, look like that of a bone from a warm blooded animal.  If this sample is a fragment of a fossilized bone & based on the fore-mentioned sediments, it could be from a ice age animal.  Jonny74, could you provide us with a pic of the sample with a scale, and a general area where the sample was found?  That's my 2 cents worth.  :)

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30 minutes ago, 4meter said:

The internal structures seen in cross section, look like that of a bone from a warm blooded animal.  If this sample is a fragment of a fossilized bone & based on the fore-mentioned sediments, it could be from a ice age animal.  Jonny74, could you provide us with a pic of the sample with a scale, and a general area where the sample was found?  That's my 2 cents worth.  :)

Thanks for that - Here is photo with a scale (coin is 20mm OD). Find location is north east Ireland.

 

 

WIN_20160808_17_33_37_Pro - Copy.jpg

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Thanks for the scaled photo, Jonny74.  I'm pretty sure its a fossil fragment and from this scale photo, we can rule out Dino fossil.  NE Ireland is a large chunk of real estate, so, here is an interactive Ireland Geology Map that you can use to pin down the geologic formations where you found the fossil.  If you take the find to a vertebrate paleontologist at a local university, they could pin it down for sure.  Here is the link to the Geological Survey of Ireland that also has a wealth of info.  Let us know what you find out about this find as you collect more information about it.  It's a cool find!

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1 hour ago, 4meter said:

Thanks for the scaled photo, Jonny74.  I'm pretty sure its a fossil fragment and from this scale photo, we can rule out Dino fossil.  NE Ireland is a large chunk of real estate, so, here is an interactive Ireland Geology Map that you can use to pin down the geologic formations where you found the fossil.  If you take the find to a vertebrate paleontologist at a local university, they could pin it down for sure.  Here is the link to the Geological Survey of Ireland that also has a wealth of info.  Let us know what you find out about this find as you collect more information about it.  It's a cool find!

Thanks 4meter, & my apologies, I should have been more specific in the location, the find site is north of Dublin, in Co. Meath & the geology for this area is limestone. I have just been looking at other fossil forums for possible similar finds, i.e - femur heads, & I am starting to warm to the possibility, however still not 100% convinced. I am going to contact the national museum here in Dublin & get them to have a look & I will update this topic in due course, once I have further news . . .   

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12 hours ago, Shokmelt said:

Ireland ! Seriously ! And here I was trying to figure out what that thing could be from Sea to Shining Sea ! :tisk-tisk:

No Worries! I think 4meter is probably right. He obviously knows his stuff. :thumbsupanim

He probably is, however I am unable to find a point of reference that allows me to make a comparison, I would expect that with all of the bones, prehistory or fossil, there would be plenty of cross section specimens of trabecula / femoral heads that would look like the below, but I am not seeing it - if anyone has or can locate a comparison image of a prepared cross section of a femoral head, please do share -

 

 

 

WIN_20160810_22_27_23_Pro.jpg

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28 minutes ago, Au Seeker said:

Image result for cross section of a femoral head,

 

That is a scan of some sorts & there are plenty of examples of those to be found, but not of a prepared cross section. While I agree that they are similar, there are differences & what I would like to see is an actual cross section that looks like the one in my last post. Surely there has to be examples?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The problem that I have with this being a bone is that the exterior of the specimen is displaying signs of melt & to the best of my knowledge bone will melt at extremely high temperatures - It's not the result of cremation as the temperature range for cremation reduces the bone to ash, with melting occurring as the next phase after ash.

A femur head is perfectly rounded & as such is easy to identify. In this case, there is noticeable inward deformation which has eaten into the surface, it is possible that this deformation could be caused by some sort of disease (if it is a bone), or exposure to weathering. However the problem with either of the aforementioned is that both would bring about exposure to the internal bone structure, which as you can see in the below photos, the internal structure is not exposed.

What is clearly visible is layering & a number of holes which are exactly like vesicles, one even has a rotational formation, which rotates anti-clockwise from the hole (visible dead center in the 2nd photo), & again is linked to the formation of layers. Just left of this hole is a spherule formation.

 

layers.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I agree that the glassy-looking and crazing-like surface is oddly curious. Though if you compare the bone-image

supplied by AU Seeker to the broken-away interior exposure on your "rock", their seems to be a probable similarity. In the bone

image, it can be seen that their is a dense area of bone-material that cross-cuts in a curving fashion. It's hard to

tell in a 2D image, but to me, it looks as though the curved-area in the X-Rayed bone (on right side) is very similar to

the chipped-away portion of your specimen. That hole in the center, assuming it's a fossil, could have been 

formed by an insect or worm of some kind before it became fossilized. And the layering you mention, and clearly

seen in the photo, could have something to do with the way the bone originally grew, maybe.

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30 minutes ago, Shokmelt said:

I agree that the glassy-looking and crazing-like surface is oddly curious. Though if you compare the bone-image

supplied by AU Seeker to the broken-away interior exposure on your "rock", their seems to be a probable similarity. In the bone

image, it can be seen that their is a dense area of bone-material that cross-cuts in a curving fashion. It's hard to

tell in a 2D image, but to me, it looks as though the curved-area in the X-Rayed bone (on right side) is very similar to

the chipped-away portion of your specimen. That hole in the center, assuming it's a fossil, could have been 

formed by an insect or worm of some kind before it became fossilized. And the layering you mention, and clearly

seen in the photo, could have something to do with the way the bone originally grew, maybe.

I would think the internal structures are to similar for it not to be a bone. But here is another aspect - What's with the perfectly straight angular formation, when does bone look like this? It's almost as if it has been cut with a precision cutting tool, like a laser. It's to angular, to straight, to symmetrical for a cremated bone, or for to say its the result of weathering. What process would cause this?

 

WIN_20160808_17_38_37_Pro.jpg

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1 hour ago, Shokmelt said:

I suppose that it could have been ground flat by being pressed and slid across a relatively flat

bedrock exposure at the base of a continental glacier. 

 

To be honest, I don't know, all I know is that it's full of angles & the perfectly rounded, as you can see in the internal matrix photos.

 

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Jonny74, you can always do a hardness test on the sample's exposed, interior, outer rim.  If it is bone, it will be somewhere between 3 & 5 on the moh's hardness scale.  If it is rhyolite or basalt it will be between 6 & 8 on the moh's hardness scale.  That is a good starting point.

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