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Found this one in an ancient sea bed along side megladon teeth. Looks like a well weathered specimen, I think it may have been rolling along the sea bed at some point or it got weathered by the harsh winds. Or something.

 I'm only 51% pro meteorite as it passed every test in the book, but it just doesn't look the part Except the window I made show an unusual amount of metals if it wasn't for that I probably would have tossed it ha

well please let me know what you think. Thank you

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Hey Chris,

       Fred is right, you need to cut, grind or sand deeper into the suspect rock, to get a better look inside.  Also,

you'll get a better photo, with natural colors if you photograph in sunlight, and don't photograph a specimen

when it's wet.  give it a shot.

                                                Good Hunting,  Ben

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The ocean is an extremely corrosive place for meteorites, a stony meteorite wouldn't last a month in the ocean due to the salt, water, and mechanical action of the tides.  A solid iron might last longer, but no one has ever recovered a meteorite from the ocean or a beach and for good reason.

The exterior is all wrong, both in texture and composition.  There is absolutely nothing on the outside that would give any indication that rock is anything other than terrestrial.  It, literally, looks nothing like a meteorite.  Inside as well, just a rock, sorry.

Rocks that "roll along the sea bed" are smooth.  Ever seen a cobble beach?  Take note of what all those rocks look like.

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Edited by Mikestang
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I will just say that from what I have observed through general interest and research, meteorites can be well hidden and buried and you won't find them without the proper equipment and knowledge.

The ones that are exposed and have been for a long time can blend right in with everything else around it. Then there are those that just stick out like a sore thumb like found at the top and bottom of the earth or deserts. Just going from find images and media there. 

So can sand and wind have an effect? I would say yes to that. It can have an effect on just about anything.

 

To sum up, I guess hunting meteorites is no day at the beach. :)

Edited by Leeway
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4 hours ago, chris1987 said:

thanks for the info, is it possible for a meteorite to be blasted by sand and wind til it becomes unrecognizable? For future references

Anything is possible, but if it's unrecognizable then how do you know you found it?  Most often even the most sand blasted of Saharan NWA chondrites that have been out there for thousands of years are still recognizable as such.  There are some super rare planetaries that don't look like meteorites, but they are found by the expert hunters of the experts who know exactly what they are looking for and where to look, for example this lunar meteorite: http://www.tucsonmeteorites.com/mpodmain.asp?DD=6/7/2016&WYD=

If I just saw a picture of that I would say it isn't a meteorite.  If I saw it on the ground I'd walk right passed it.  But the guys who find those know just what they are after and all the lab work confirms that it is lunar, no speculation.  No one accidentally finds a lunar meteorite like that.

Edited by Mikestang
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thank you everyone for the information I would like to ask your professional opinions on another suspect meteorite I'm not sure if its worth grinding a window or not as it is barley magnetic.

thanks again!

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Edited by chris1987
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On July 11, 2016 at 11:49 AM, Mikestang said:

The ocean is an extremely corrosive place for meteorites, a stony meteorite wouldn't last a month in the ocean due to the salt, water, and mechanical action of the tides.  A solid iron might last longer,

Mike, are you sure about that? To my understanding an iron would corrode much faster due to its high iron content...because chondrites have far less iron, it is less susceptible to corrosion and therefor would last longer submerged in water. Is a month a true time or is it one of those might/maybe/not sure but I'll say something anyways, comments? What if it was 100kilos? In a month it's gone?...I know your mom has called you a know it all since you were 7, but if you don't know something, try not to make up an answer. I know if i listened to you, I probably would have thrown away 4 kilos of precious space gems. I can't figure out if you actually believe you know everything, or if you were just picked on in school as that weird kid who collected stupid rocks and is now proving himself to people who post "obvious" meteorwrongs...

I say good on ya Chris...if some of these guys are saying grind a better window and take some better pics, then obviously you're on the right track..and if it turns out to be a meteorwrong, well you obviously have a good eye and it's only a matter of time ?

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17 hours ago, chris1987 said:

thank you everyone for the information I would like to ask your professional opinions on another suspect meteorite I'm not sure if its worth grinding a window or not as it is barley magnetic.

Not a meteorite, looks like hematite iron ore.

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50 minutes ago, munroney said:

Mike, are you sure about that? To my understanding an iron would corrode much faster due to its high iron content...because chondrites have far less iron, it is less susceptible to corrosion and therefor would last longer submerged in water. Is a month a true time or is it one of those might/maybe/not sure but I'll say something anyways, comments? What if it was 100kilos? In a month it's gone?...I know your mom has called you a know it all since you were 7, but if you don't know something, try not to make up an answer. I know if i listened to you, I probably would have thrown away 4 kilos of precious space gems. I can't figure out if you actually believe you know everything, or if you were just picked on in school as that weird kid who collected stupid rocks and is now proving himself to people who post "obvious" meteorwrongs...

Yes, I am sure.  A solid piece of iron lasts much, much longer than a fragile rock with a little iron mixed in.  E.g. take a look at the Chelyabinsk main mass they pulled from a FRESH water lake where it sat for a very small amount of time and compare it to specimens recovered from the surface after the fall.

As to the rest of your bs, I won't bother to respond.  Maybe you have a crush on me, cross posting off-handed comments I make in other threads.  You're not my type.

Edited by Mikestang
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6 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Yes, I am sure.  A solid piece of iron lasts much, much longer than a fragile rock with a little iron mixed in.  E.g. take a look at the Chelyabinsk main mass they pulled from a FRESH water lake where it sat for a very small amount of time and compare it to specimens recovered from the surface after the fall.

As to the rest of your bs, I won't bother to respond.  Maybe you have a crush on me, cross posting off-handed comments I make in other threads.  You're not my type.

 

6 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Yes, I am sure.  A solid piece of iron lasts much, much longer than a fragile rock with a little iron mixed in.  E.g. take a look at the Chelyabinsk main mass they pulled from a FRESH water lake where it sat for a very small amount of time and compare it to specimens recovered from the surface after the fall.

As to the rest of your bs, I won't bother to respond.  Maybe you have a crush on me, cross posting off-handed comments I make in other threads.  You're not my type.

 

6 hours ago, Mikestang said:

Yes, I am sure.  A solid piece of iron lasts much, much longer than a fragile rock with a little iron mixed in.  E.g. take a look at the Chelyabinsk main mass they pulled from a FRESH water lake where it sat for a very small amount of time and compare it to specimens recovered from the surface after the fall.

As to the rest of your bs, I won't bother to respond.  Maybe you have a crush on me, cross posting off-handed comments I make in other threads.  You're not my type.

Hm, that's strange, because I just finished reading an interesting article in "hunting for stars" about an astronomer named Donald Brownlee who led expeditions in the middle of the pacific, some 5000m down. It says that "Brownlee and his associates succeeded in a few years in magnetically raking up over 100,000 partially or completely melted micrometeorites"

So now i am really confused because I am reading this in a professional meteorite book, yet I have an "expert" telling me it is near impossible to recover meteorites that had once been under water and that "no one has ever recovered a meteorite from the ocean" ??

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To me it doesn't have any signs of being a space rock on the surface or even an ocean associated rock.

In one photo it seems to be leaching out copper and/or nickel.
If it contains iron at all and it was in a salt water environment for very long at all it would be an extremely oxidized red/brown on the surface.So I dont know how it ended up where it was reported found in a (ocean) salt water environment
but it could not have been there very long. much less a pre or even post Pliocene period space stone. It may have tumbled down out of more recent deposit (hillside/mountain)and that would explain the terrestrial surface and interior of the stone.
Meteors can last for billions of years in space without much chemical alteration but not on earth.
AzNuggetBob

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From a novice, it does not look like one to me.

You mentioned before that the first one had shiny metallic inclusions, but I still do not see that in the images. 

My yard is full of those kinds of meteorites. 

Take a look at this image. About a 2 foot square spot I usually park my truck on in my yard. 

Most of them are attracted to a magnet.

Hematite of some kind. 

 

 

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11 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

To me it doesn't have any signs of being a space rock on the surface or even an ocean associated rock.

In one photo it seems to be leaching out copper and/or nickel.
If it contains iron at all and it was in a salt water environment for very long at all it would be an extremely oxidized red/brown on the surface.So I dont know how it ended up where it was reported found in a (ocean) salt water environment
but it could not have been there very long. much less a pre or even post Pliocene period space stone. It may have tumbled down out of more recent deposit (hillside/mountain)and that would explain the terrestrial surface and interior of the stone.
Meteors can last for billions of years in space without much chemical alteration but not on earth.
AzNuggetBob

hi thanks for your input, are you talking about the first or second rock I posted? Or both? Everyone is getting to hung up on the ocean part it was an ocean millions of years ago, so they might not have even touched salt water

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4 hours ago, Leeway said:

From a novice, it does not look like one to me.

You mentioned before that the first one had shiny metallic inclusions, but I still do not see that in the images. 

My yard is full of those kinds of meteorites. 

Take a look at this image. About a 2 foot square spot I usually park my truck on in my yard. 

Most of them are attracted to a magnet.

Hematite of some kind. 

 

 

driveway.JPG

what about the second one leeway?

 

Impressive driveway haha, il take a better pic today

Edited by chris1987
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I'm no expert and I'm not sure what you have there but keep on looking.  It can be really hard to definitively identify a meteorite (or wrong) from photos on the internet but it is a good way to start learning and sorting things out. Sometimes it is pretty obvious though.  Go ahead and cut into them with a rock saw and compare to known meteorites and terrestrial rocks so you can learn for yourself what to look for and how to discriminate between the two.  I'll go so far as to say I wouldn't rule out either one as being a meteorite from these photos, but as I said I'm no expert.  Cutting them open would reveal a lot more.  I built myself a rock saw and I cut open all kinds of meteor wrongs just to learn what they look like on the inside compared to the outside.  Everything looks cool when you cut it open!  I spend hours and hours looking at meteorite photos and go to museums and shows to see them in person. 

I don't know what it takes to become an "expert" or even what that means but don't be put off by finding meteor wrongs or people on forums telling you that you won't find any unless you are an expert.  If you spend lots of time in the field (in a good area) and educate yourself about meteorites you can find some and become a self proclaimed expert too!  Also don't give up on a rock that is "strange" until you are sure it is not a meteorite.  One reason why most meteorite hunters (even experts) don't find achondrites like the lunar in the link shown above is that they are looking for chondrites.  I wonder how many really interesting achondrites have been thrown to the ground because they "didn't look like a meteorite."

Edited by Redbeard
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