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Triple digit temps in the arizona drserts


Ahorton10

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Well it's official guys, the heat is here.  Im just curious,  how many die hards prospect through the az summer?  For those that prospect seasonally what's your cut off temp before waiting for fall?  I've pushed it into the 110 range in the past and learned real fast that digging isn't so much fun in the heat. You're also limited to staying close by your vehicle because yoy can't carry enough water.  I plan to continue in the higher elevations from time to tim but my gear is really set up for desert mining.  Who's gonna stick it out and find gold when most call it quits?

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This has been discussed in past threads, and you pretty much just nut-shelled the 'survey' results.. Out your way even tarps for shade are fairly useless once above 110.. All you can do is head for elevation..

Down this way, it ain't the heat -- it's the humidity.. We've had a bit of a "cool" run for a few days, lower-mid '80s after a run of '90 degree temps.. Virtually no difference as far as sweating goes.. The heat can be kinda handled along the shore, but in another month or so if yer out between 10A - 2P without at least a minimum SPF yer gonna burn to a crisp..

Swamp

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Adam:
  I was out the last two days....its HOT out there. Plus it was a pretty rugged area so that takes a lot of energy.

 Dad and I usually stop our "regular" trips by June. Then after about 3 weeks we start watching for a day it wil be under 100. Will get out real early and quit by noon.

Its a lot hotter in the rocks out there than what the forcast says. Take a IR thermometer and read some of the rocks. I did that ind some of them were in the 130 deg. area.

So, all thats radiating back up on you.

Stay safe bud. We do have one on of the longest hunting seasons I think.

Dad and I are going to do our annual bradshaw camp out in Mid July that your welcome to come to.

Tom H.

 

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Hey Tom,  keep me posted on the campout!  The yukon has brand new bf goodrich all terains on it this year haha.  

 

 

Swamp, you're right that this has been discussed haha.  I whine about it every year when it gets hot.  I'm glad we don't get too much humidity but when it does get humid it's pretty brutal and often means the washes aren't a safe place to be when storms are threatening. 

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Haven't been thru AZ summer so can't say yet.

Bit hot last few times out but just staying covered up and hydrated does the trick.

Heading back to Brazil in a few days so won't be able to test my limits.

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I stick it out too. Lived here since I was six. In the desert sometimes all you needs is sweat and a slight breeze, Sunflower seeds and a couple of bottles of water.

I work in it so I might as well play in it. 

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I spent years prospecting thru the AZ summer heat but once the temps are over 100 it's time for cooler locations. What the heat really represents is the opportunity to travel, Cali, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Washington and Alaska. That's my approach.

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I like your take on it rod, I tend to take more family road trips and things like tha in the summer.  

 

Fishing,  Im an az native and work outside all day too.   I have noticed that if I don't stay out of the sun on the weekends it makes my work week a lot tougher.  My job is very physical and fast paced and it's harder for me to recharge my batteries when it's hot.  I do however get gold fever too bad to call it quits completely and try to sample and explore and use the beeper more then save the heavy shovel work for cooler months.

Edited by Ahorton10
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I would prospect year round in the AZ heat, but I would often be on site by 3:30 am, and I would make a point to be torn down by 10am.  There were some days I'd stay later, but  would always try to get the hard digging done early and be working on a less strenuous clean up.  After tearing down, I usually went home, but would sometimes I would drive to a new site I was looking at to get eyes on it.

The temperature swings between day and night are pretty extreme.  When I slept outside in the summer, I would not need a blanket.  Just the cot in the bed of the pick up.

I would take at least two gallons of water.  I never drank it all, but would drink over a gallon on the hot days.  Other things for my "survival kit" is snake garters and sunscreen.

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Ya, early hunts and night hunts can be a lot of fun. Night hunts provide the opportunity to see lots of critters and have some fun with blacklights looking for florescent minerals and of course scorpions. I've heard many people be fearful of night hunts due to mountain lions, etc. but we never had any problems like that, never worried about it. Still, I prefer a few weeks or a month of cooler temps in another state over night or early hunts in the desert any time.

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On 5/15/2016 at 11:17 PM, boulder dash said:

I'm hard core I'll stick it out.

 

On 5/15/2016 at 0:13 PM, Ahorton10 said:

 I've seen your thermometer photos when you're out drywashing.   You guys are animals.

It's guys like BD & teams like BD & adam wot's the reason they needed to invent an Olympic-type tally-and-average methodology.. Ya absolutely have to toss out the high and low first, else ya get skewed representations.. 
:5bat::Diggin_a_hole::black_knight_standing::yesss::wee:

Swamp

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I was pretty excited with my new GPZ purchase last year and some of the gold I was finding with it and hunted all through the summer.

However this year I'm already starting to slow down and "slack off". I'm thinking I'll probably wait for that new coil to come out then that'll get me back out to the field. 

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I like to dig in the evening once in a while when it's hot.  My body seems to do better when I'm fresh during the heat and it's cooling down as I get worn out.  When I drywash in the morning I start getting lazy and worn out just about the time I get to the good pay dirt lol.  I think this year I'll try over nighters where I do most the digging through the evening and then get up early and run the material through the drywasher and head home before it stops being fun.  I've never detected at night,  I'd love to try it but I do get concerned about cactus and snakes.  If I ever get some chaps maybe I'll start trying that, for now I can't stay out of the cholla when it's sunny haha.

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2 hours ago, Ahorton10 said:

I like to dig in the evening once in a while when it's hot, etc...

I realize numerous factors come into play, but even during the lowest humidity days of summer doesn't the desert hit dew point at night more often than not..? Just wondering, since that means you'll need to tarp your material in order to get an early start..

Also, wouldn't you approach night detecting in the desert differently than during the day..? Since you naturally need to slow down anyhow due to it being dark, I'd work a small area as thoroughly as possible instead of trying to cover ground.. Assuming nuggets have been found in the area already, why not where you're camping just as much as 'over there'..? I'd even thought about small hand pushes if it's far enough to the caliche to make a signal difference, which usually it isn't but sometimes is, and the surface geology looks especially promising..

Just a couple thoughts running through my head, from a guy who isn't there to give them a try to see if they actually work or make a difference..

Swamp

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Even when it feels like a giant hair dryer is directed at you, the good news is that the air still is moving.  Constantly moving air presents desert daytime detecting (and sometimes even desert mining) possibilities.  This is so because, if utilized properly, the moving air can wick off your body heat.  A lot of water and other precautions, of course, are required.  But a day trip or even an overnighter can become doable when that overpowering urge for a nugget fix seizes your better sense.  Another great feature of such conditions is the almost complete absence of prying, thieving daytime eyes.  There is much to be said about how best to operate in such extreme conditions.  Everyone likely has their own approach.  Probably a good topic to revisit on a separate post...

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I agree with yoy micro about not having the prying eyes, but there's also something kinda sketchy knowing I'd yoy broke down or got hurt there's not likely anyone coming around for days or weeks in hot remote areas.  As far as wicking sweat goes, it's best to wear cotton and keep the moisture on your body unless you have a large supply of water.  Wicking it away keeps you cooler but dehydrates faster.  

 

Swamp,  we don't get dew in the summer.  It's so dry most the time it's a non issue and even when the humidity does come up the ground is so hot that it all evaporates.  In the winter time we get dew and moisture sticks around a little longer but most the time it's plenty dry enough to drywash.   I've gone out after a decent rain and it was dry just a couple inches under the surface.

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