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munroney

Meteorite with shock veins?

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One further thing, those aren't shock veins, but rather veins of hematite/magnetite.

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If the world is your oyster, then it is rather 'simple' to go to the university of your choice that classifies meteorites.  Get them to look at your finds and you don't have to tell them 'too much' because they will take some pieces from you for their efforts. (I have at least 3 within 500 miles of where I live.)

You could also 'partner' with hunters that we all know that publicly sell meteorites and they will tell you how to make the most from your finds.  They will also tell you about private collectors who want not just the meteorite but everything near it and that will make it much more valuable that a few veins.

The unusual part about all of your discussion here so far is that you don't seem to know those people and you have gone to a public forum to show your finds when most meteorite dealers would never do the same.

We don't know whether to say thanks or 'no chance!'  

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On May 19, 2016 at 8:10 PM, mn90403 said:

If the world is your oyster, then it is rather 'simple' to go to the university of your choice that classifies meteorites.  Get them to look at your finds and you don't have to tell them 'too much' because they will take some pieces from you for their efforts. (I have at least 3 within 500 miles of where I live.)

You could also 'partner' with hunters that we all know that publicly sell meteorites and they will tell you how to make the most from your finds.  They will also tell you about private collectors who want not just the meteorite but everything near it and that will make it much more valuable that a few veins.

The unusual part about all of your discussion here so far is that you don't seem to know those people and you have gone to a public forum to show your finds when most meteorite dealers would never do the same.

We don't know whether to say thanks or 'no chance!'  

I'm 10,000km from home right now, but yes, the plan is to definitely get at least a couple classified. I feel like it's possible that I have 2 different meteorites, and I would definitely need to classify in order to start mapping the right strewn field. Unlike what Joe Dirt thinks, they are most definitely shock veins. I know a guy in the area who found one 30kms away, and his is classified with the exact same veins. Also, the fusion crust is a dead giveaway, not to mention the thumb prints on a few specimens, nose cones, and most importantly, condrules. I may be new at this, but I'm not an idiot ?

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2 hours ago, SanDomingoJim said:

Who's Joe Dirt??

JOe Dirt and his meteor

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On 5/21/2016 at 7:32 AM, munroney said:

 they are most definitely shock veins

You should refrain from definitive statements until you have had them analyzed.  I see no indication of shock melt or shock veining, but I see plenty of iron oxide veins that look similar to the inexperienced.

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On May 23, 2016 at 2:23 PM, Mikestang said:

You should refrain from definitive statements until you have had them analyzed.  I see no indication of shock melt or shock veining, but I see plenty of iron oxide veins that look similar to the inexperienced.

Define inexperienced. I was searching level 10 areas that seemed to only have hematite...every other rock was highly magnetic with what looked to be "fusion crust" (actually just desert varnish)...this made the search incredibly difficult, but the ones I chose to keep stood out more than any other rock around...especially the ones that had no other rocks around, that seemed to fall from no where into the middle of a sand dune. This drew a red flag and lead me to believe it was something more than just a terrestrial rock. I think if I was so inexperienced, I would have 1000 kilos in my bag, because I would be keeping pretty much every rock I saw ?

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On ‎4‎/‎10‎/‎2016 at 10:02 PM, munroney said:

Pretty sure I found some meteorites in the desert. most of them look to have "shock veins". Does this make them more valuable? They are highly attracted to a magnet, some oxidizing, fusion crust, condrules, shock veins, thumbprints, nose cones..everything. Is it rare to find so many meteorites

Unless I'm missing something....

You came here and requested help from the 'experts'.

I have no doubts that Mike, Fred, and Mitchell know what they are talking about.  Or they would not say anything...

It just seems to me that every time someone tries to pass some information your way.  You come back with some kind of snarky response.

Perhaps it's just the way I'm reading it, but it seems rather rude.

Just my observations.  Carry on...

Luke

 

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1 hour ago, munroney said:

Define inexperienced. I was searching level 10 areas that seemed to only have hematite...every other rock was highly magnetic with what looked to be "fusion crust" (actually just desert varnish)...this made the search incredibly difficult, but the ones I chose to keep stood out more than any other rock around...especially the ones that had no other rocks around, that seemed to fall from no where into the middle of a sand dune. This drew a red flag and lead me to believe it was something more than just a terrestrial rock. I think if I was so inexperienced, I would have 1000 kilos in my bag, because I would be keeping pretty much every rock I saw ?

What is a "level 10 area", did you make that up?  I congratulate you on finding a nice hunting spot, but luck and experience are not the same thing.

You are brand new here, I am guessing these are the first meteorites you have found?  That makes you inexperienced.  It's not a put down, it is a statement of fact.  Seeing as you are referring to iron oxide veins as shock veins (and you are "sure" what they are) illustrates this.

How much time have you devoted to studying meteoritics?  What is your geology background?  What books have you read?  Who has instructed you?  How long have you been hunting?  Which well known hunters have you spent time with in the field and learned from?  These are the types of things that give you experience.

I never ask anyone to do something I wouldn't do, so I'll go first to illustrate: I have been interested in meteorites for more than 30 years, I've read almost every book on the subject I could find and understand (most of the graduate-level books deal with subjects that are beyond me), I've studied geology in college and on my own as I prepare one day to get my Masters in Geology.  I have studied thousands and thousands of meteorites in person.  I have found several hundred meteorites across 3 states and have logged thousands of hours and hundreds of miles in the field.  I have been hunting since 2010 and have had the privilege to hunt with and learn from meteorite greats such as Ruben Garcia, Geoff Notkin, Bob Verish, Ben & Erik Fisler, Dr. Nick Gessler, and Sonny Clary to name a few.

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59 minutes ago, LukeJ said:

 

Perhaps it's just the way I'm reading it, but it seems rather rude.

Just my observations.  Carry on...

Luke

 

I find it rather rude that someone has to shoot down my findings just because I won't reveal the location. If they are simply terrestrial rocks, why is the location so important. I feel like I'm being bullied into telling the location, and that's rude. I didn't come here requesting a dollar value according on where I found it. I know it didn't come from NWA, and that's all that matters. I have taken a lot into consideration from this thread, I just feel it's a little disrespectful to bully a newbie into revealing the location. i should also add that I know a meteorite "expert" in this area. He is reputable with many classified meteorites. He grinded a window and had no doubt that it was a meteorite.. That was just his assumption though. ?

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12 minutes ago, Mikestang said:

 

So I'll go first: I have been interested in meteorites for more than 30 years, I've read almost every book on the subject I could find and understand (most of the graduate-level books deal with subjects that are beyond me), I've studied geology in college and on my own as I prepare one day to get my Masters in Geology.  I have studied thousands and thousands of meteorites in person.  I have found several hundred meteorites across 3 states.  I have been hunting since 2010 and have had the privilege to hunt with and learn from meteorite greats such as Ruben Garcia, Geoff Notkin, Bob Verish, Ben & Erik Fisler, Dr. Nick Gessler, and Sonny Clary to name a few.

And you haven't even left the country? If I had as much experience as you, I would go to places that no man has searched before...actually, I did...it wasn't luck. It was looking at the bigger picture and thinking outside of the box. America is a box. 

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Oh, and my experience is traveling the world and going places most westerners wouldn't..I have been to 30 countries, most poverty stricken and dangerous, I speak 3 languages, and without that knowledge, I wouldn't have found a darn thing. I take risks most people wouldn't. i go to places most people wouldn't, and that is the reason I found so many.  i have been interested in meteorites for the past 3 years. Some hands on experience, but mostly self tought via that Internet. It's not much, but I'm definitely not that guy who posts a picture of some black rock he found in his backyard. I have enough experience to feel it worth while to fly to the other side of the world and give it a go ?

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I never "shot down" your finds, just requested more information. Science is about sharing and disseminating information.  Making claims without supporting information is non-productive and I do not condone it.

 

4 hours ago, munroney said:

i should also add that I know a meteorite "expert" in this area. He is reputable with many classified meteorites. He grinded a window and had no doubt that it was a meteorite.

Who is it?  If you won't give his name then we have no way to judge his credentials and know if he knows what he is talking about.  Not that I doubt some of your finds are meteorites, but you have to understand your situation is not unique and people make crazy claims all the time about meteorites and say an "expert" looked at their rock and told them XYZ and blah blah blah...

 

4 hours ago, munroney said:

And you haven't even left the country? If I had as much experience as you, I would go to places that no man has searched before..

I have visited Mexico and Canada in my life, but have not had the opportunity to travel the world (your world traveling is good life experience, but doesn't mean anything with respect to meteorites).  Has nothing to do with meteorites, though, as much of my hunting is done where "no man [or woman] has searched before".  I do not have the means to take trips around the world to look for meteorites, nor do I have the need when some of the world's best hunting is within a day's drive of my house.

If meteorites really interest you then keep learning, read books, and most importantly go look at real meteorites in person.  The internet is not the best resource for this arena, but it does have some good stuff here and there.  I hope you find a bunch more and are willing and able to share more information about them.

 

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23 hours ago, munroney said:

actually, I did...it wasn't luck.

One further thought to share, and this goes with meteorite hunting experience: a huge part of finding meteorites is luck.  Looking for them takes no luck, but finding them sure does.  Even in a known strewn field with thousands of potential finds laying around you have to have some luck to walk over a spot where a meteorite is.  I like to say that meteorite hunting is 50% luck, 50% skill, and 50% hard work.

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4 hours ago, Mikestang said:

One further thought to share, and this goes with meteorite hunting experience: a huge part of finding meteorites is luck.  Looking for them takes no luck, but finding them sure does.  Even in a known strewn field with thousands of potential finds laying around you have to have some luck to walk over a spot where a meteorite is.  I like to say that meteorite hunting is 50% luck, 50% skill, and 50% hard work.

Luck is stubbing your toe on a meteorite in the backyard...of course luck has a little to do with meteorite hunting, but I believe it's more about hard work and definitely a little skill. I'm almost certain meteorite men would never go to the place I went, and that's where my skill set as a world traveler comes into play.  Not even the most advanced meteorite hunters would set foot where I went, and to me that is a very valuable skill..I spent 3 weeks in total camping in the "strewnfield", not showering for 3-5 days each trip. I would search from sun up to sun down logging approx 10-20km per  day. This added up to 100's of kms by the time I left. That's where hard work comes into play. Also, I believe energies. If you go out there thinking you aren't going to find anything, you won't. You have to really really REALLY want that meteorite, or you will find nothing. Luck only happens when you are negative but stumble upon one. I took a big gamble flying as far as I did to search for something I have never found before. Yes, it was my first meteorites ever found, but not my first time searching. My first expedition was half assed and a failure. I learned from my mistakes after taking home a bag full of meteorwrongs (magnetite I believe).  I listened to the professionals who were telling me none of them are meteorites, and I will listen again. I'm not a know-it-all, but I do know at least half of them are meteorites...the other ones that lack fusion crust and hold a different shape... well, I'm not Sooo confident. I will take everyone's advice here and sit down in my seat until the classification is processed. I appreciate everyone's input and will update you guys as soon as I get the results from the analysis ✌

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18 minutes ago, munroney said:

I spent 3 weeks in total camping in the "strewnfield", not showering for 3-5 days each trip. I would search from sun up to sun down logging approx 10-20km per  day. This added up to 100's of kms by the time I left. That's where hard work comes into play. Also, I believe energies. If you go out there thinking you aren't going to find anything, you won't. You have to really really REALLY want that meteorite, or you will find nothing. Luck only happens when you are negative but stumble upon one. I took a big gamble flying as far as I did to search for something I have never found before. Yes, it was my first meteorites ever found, but not my first time searching. My first expedition was half assed and a failure. I learned from my mistakes after taking home a bag full of meteorwrongs (magnetite I believe).

Now there's some of the missing story I was after!  You should have shared this in your first post, it adds so much more and garners more response than, "Here's some pictures of rocks".  You could actually do a whole trip report about your hunt without giving away the location.  Any field in-situ photos of your finds would be great, too, as long as you are comfortable sharing them (sometimes folks will blur out features in the background that may give the location away).

 

18 minutes ago, munroney said:

Not even the most advanced meteorite hunters would set foot where I went

Now hold your horses!  You obviously have never heard of Michael Farmer's adventures to make a claim like that.  I think he spent more time in jail in Oman than you have spent total looking for meteorites; he has some crazy stories.

 

Oh yea, and be sure you know the laws for wherever you are hunting, not all countries let you look for meteorites, or pick them up, or keep them, or take them out of the country.

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Chelyabinsk has some of the best examples of shock veining and shock melt, here are a couple example I found with a quick search.

This one came labeled already.

Chely-interior-fingers_S.jpg

 

So here the unshocked material is the light matrix, and the shock melt is the dark stuff.

Chely-slice-with-thick-veinsS.jpg

 

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It's best to Just send your Finds off to a reliable University to get them classified.

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Mike, I commend you for having the patience to continue help Mun...hopefully he will do the write-up you propose...I would love to read it!

fred

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Thanks for the help Mike...that's what I'm here for ? I meant to say "most professionals", because I have definitely heard of michael farmer. He's my idol ?

Im no writer, but I would consider doing a write up. It was an adventure, that's for sure. Never paid off so many cops in my life, and the pulsating UFO that flew aimlessly around at night was definitely something new as well. Maybe he was there to take back his rocks ?

I took a couple more magnified pics because I realized that the ones I posted are pretty useless. I believe the round circles are chondrules....and if they aren't chondrules, and they aren't shock veins, well then I'm throwing in the towel because I'm tired of hauling around rocks ?

Some veins go through the chondrules, but most go around the outer edge of it (as you can see in the second picture-top left) 

image.png

 

image.png

image.png

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Yup, those round things are chondrules.  Good pictures.

Some times the veins of iron oxide are a result of weathering, sitting here on Earth for a long time and water finds its way into teeny tiny cracks.  Sometimes they are just part of how the meteorite body formed.  Or who knows, maybe I'm way off base and they are weathered shock veins.  I think it takes a scientist to analyze it for shocked minerals and determine.

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