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New Hampshire find...


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As usual I was out with my metal detector looking for historic finds in new England and ran across something that set my detector off!!! Dig dig dig lol it was a rock. A rock? Ok I kept it and researched.. Heavy for its size, fusion crust, slightly magnetic, dmg proved positive yay.. Metallic grains and earth magnet separates grounds on different polarities.. Odd but I've researched that as well. I'm just wanting your opinion.. Thank you in advance. Jenny

Edited by Jenite
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Hey Don ... I don't use photobucket at all ... I can transfer any photo in my .jpg format direct to the forum. Never understood why folks insist on using the 'bucket'. OOPS! :nono: Just stumbled on one of Bill's old flagged posts requesting us to use PB to post pictures ... forgot all about that post ... maybe I will try PB after all! :inocent:

Mike F

Edited by Mike Furness
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Mike, if you use 3rd party hosting then it's no drain on this site's bandwidth and they don't have to pay for it, that's why most forums prefer hosted photos vs. direct upload.

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You're a silly troll. 7045 is a Pallasite, albeit a very weathered one. And if that really is a piece, so what? You lied and posted shitty pictures, what's your point? Go play in traffic.

Edited by Mikestang
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This was found in new Hampshire.. Don't think that just because a meteorite falls at the same longitude that it's not possible for pieces to fall at different latitudes... I didn't lie geography professor drove me to ask question. There is cell city and the trail to the impact site albeit across the sea but there have been finds identical in Maine as in the UK. Must be nice to find meteorites in your desert sites... What a no brainer that must be.

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Jenite,

Everything "looks" wrong about your pictures being a meteorite. The surface is not a typical meteorite fusion crust. Fusion crusts are about as thick as your fingernail, possibly as deep as 1/16th of an inch at best. The angular shape, color, and size are all wrong for a meteorite. Pallasites are heavy in metallic iron and very magnetic. They will never be 'slightly magnetic" as you state. Pallasites do not look anything like your rock. They often have a more characteristic "thumbprint" exterior, like irons and do not have a stoney exterior as does yours, Your description of your rock and pictures look nothing like a meteorite. About the only meteorite I've seen look somewhat like yours is a fossilized "relic" meteorite, of which none are known in New England, and none are pallasites.

Meteorites do not land in different latitudes. They are a single object striking the Earth, which on average travel only 65 land miles from the point in which they enter the atmosphere to the strewnfield where they land. They ablate (shatter) between 40 and 25 miles above ground, are slowed substantially, and fall at much steeper angles than the entry angle onto strewnfields (fall zones) averaging 2-3 miles wide and 5-10 miles long. An extremely low angle entry of a very large meteorite might produce a strewnfield of about 60 miles in length and about 10 miles wide. Meteorites the size of your stone slow to between 150 to 250 miles per hour and hit the ground about the same as a bowling ball dropped from a Cesna airplane. They cannot cross oceans. Meteorites hit the Earth in straight lines and do not curve around the Earth. If a plane broke up in midair over Phoenix, where I live, you wouldn't find pieces in New Hampshire.

Slightly magnetic rocks very similar looking to yours are everywhere in New Hampshire. Take it to a geologist at a local university and ask what he/she thinks it is and don't let on that you think it is a meteorite. Then, you will learn what it really is.

Keep looking down, they're out there.

Billpeters

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