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Shafto123

gold in this stone ?

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I think what you're seeing is pyrite, mainly due to your statement of " i tried the pin test and is a little bit on the hard side but with enough pressure i did get some dust to break off ", gold will not having any "dust break off", but as you mentioned pyrite "sometimes" carries gold but more pyrite doesn't contain gold than pyrite that does, that being said, IMHO you're fighting a losing battle when trying to recovery gold contained within the pyrite, if it's there at all, pyrite is a sulfide base mineral, recovery of gold contained within sulfides is very difficult if you're a professional, and almost impossible for a novice, read the following and you will hopefully get an understanding of how difficult the few processes are for doing so, also keep in mind if you do have gold the only recourse for you to recover it is by "gravity separation" e,g, panning in your case and you have already said you don't know how to pan, also as mentioned in the following the biggest gold you'll likely encounter is 75 microns, 75 microns is 200 mesh, barely visible (if you have perfect vision) to the naked eye, smaller than around 55 microns is invisible to the naked eye and as you go smaller down 55 microns and on to the 3 to 5 microns mentioned in the following you'll only be able to see it under a microscope and if it's a very good microscope and even the 75 micron/200 mesh gold will be very hard to pan for even most of the best panners, and for those of us capable of panning 200 mesh it's usually not worth the effort, unless there's a lot of 200 mesh gold in the material, and with what you show in your photos, I doubt you would have even $5 to $10 worth of gold if any at all and that;s only if you can pan it out!

http://mine-engineer.com/mining/minproc/gold-in-pyrite.htm

"Recovery of Gold in Pyritic Sulfide Ores

The now extinct Us Bureau of Mines conducted numerous studies of gold in pyrite, and sulfide ores over the years, until their untimely demise in the 1990's. Much of the referenced studies and case applications discussed in this brief article came from USMB reports, which even after they ceased to exist, still continue to provide some good scientific information to those working in the mining and mineral processing industries.

Sulfide ores, and pyrites in particular, have caused and continue to cause difficulty in recovering the gold values from these ores. In most instances, visible gold can not be seen under microscopic examination of pyrite gold ores. However, if the ore is ground to -200 mesh, most times, a few specs of gold can be visibly seen under microscopic examination. Based upon numerous case studies, it appears that gold particles in pyrite are generally fine, ranging from 75 microns down to 2 or 3 microns. The incidence of fine gold's quantity also appears to be related to the gold concentration, as well. If the assay is 2 ounces per ton, there are generally larger gold particles present along with the typically fine micron sized gold. When the grade diminishes to say, 0.2 ounces per ton, there are generally only micron sized particles associated with the pyrites in the ore. This is not absolute, but it does appear to be the trend.

Recovery of gold in sulfide ores has fallen into several categories. First is froth flotation, and second is cyanidation of the ores. Using cyanide to recover gold from sulfide ores generally results in 30 to 35% recovery, and the best I have heard of is around 50% recovery. The fine coating of a iron compound definitely appears to be a key component of the inability of cyanide to efficiently leach low grade pyritic ores. Perhaps there is some room here for a pretreatment, to remove this iron coating and then make the fine particles susceptible to cyanide leaching. To my knowledge, this has never been attempted. Generally speaking, cyanide leaching of low grade pyritic ores is economically unsatisfactory in today's market.

Low grade ores that do not respond well to cyanide or flotation are generally referred to a "refractory" ore. Which usually means that it needs to be roasted to release the gold. Roasting has to be one of the most expensive methods of recovering gold with current environmental considerations, and is usually cost prohibitive, except in a few circumstances, where grade and volume justify the economics.

Gravity concentration tends to recover the pyrite with the gold, and only removes the lighter minerals, such as quartz, from the ore. The most difficult particles to gravity concentrate are the fines, and 75 microns to 2 microns are definitely very fine. So, even if the ore were ground to 2 microns, it may not be recoverable using current gravity technology.

That appears to leave froth flotation as still the best method of recovering the gold from pyritic ores. Sulfide ores, such as chalcopyrite, sphaelerite, galena, and pyrrhotite, and mixtures of these ores have historically been found with micron size gold particles included in them. This generally involves frother, several collectors (promoters) and possibly some modifying or depressing agents as well.

Geologists and mineralogists have many theories why and how the gold occurs with the pyrite, and I will not enter into any of these areas, since I am concerned with liberating the gold from the ores. I will say that from my understanding, many seem to agree that in sulfide gold ores, the occurrence of gold appears to occur as a replacement of other minerals, possibly iron. One USBM paper summed up five noticeable characteristics of auriferous pyritic ores. The gold occurs as tiny flakes on the crystallographic planes of the pyrite. The gold flakes are very small in size, 5-10 microns. The pyrite in which small amounts of gold occurs is of crystalline variety (primary pyrite). The characteristics of primary pyrite are a absence of porosity, an extreme brittleness, a resistance to oxidation, and the existence of gold possessing a weak susceptibility to magnetism (due to a fine coating of a iron compound).

My theory is that if some economical pre-treatment in a heap leach situation, could nullify the effects of the iron coating, chemically, then the pyritic ore could be effectively and economically leached with cyanide in the heap leach. This would make the recovery of gold from pyritic sulfides economical, and negate spending hundreds of millions of dollars on roasting plants. But in the end, it all comes down to cost, which would be the most cost effective. We know roasting is almost prohibitively expensive, so I would think that treating in a heap leach, prior to cyanidation, would be much more cost effective.

Charles Kubach, Mining & Mineral Processing Engineer"

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Thanks for #19 add'l info.. I'm not at all familiar with that part of NY, nor any of the state really

with the exception of the lower half of Long Island.. But unfamiliar now doesn't matter since as soon as

you mention glacial activity all bets are off; anything might be found anywhere regardless how

out of place it may otherwise seem..

When I think of glacial gold I tend to think deposited finely ground.. This notwithstanding, assuming there is Au

in/near your target location I would think there would be geological mention noted somewhere.. By the same token,

there isn't supposed to be any gold in near-bordering PA either yet I've seen some nice chunky gold out of a small

stream near Bradford just SW of the lower W finger lakes.. In that instance though there's some local geology correct

for possible Au presence..

Swamp

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well I'll defiantly keep a look out for some good au.I guess the gold extraction is possible with enough elbow greese.

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Certainly not an expert, but I think the Assay on the panned dirt I hope would show only micro gold too small to be panned out. I would only do this if I knew where the vein was and the crushed rock proved rather rich on gold. If the crushed rock had no gold, I would no assay it. It would only help me decide whether or not to process the ore chemically or by crushing it. Also, by removing the larger chunks of gold, I would think it would avoid the "nugget" effect and skew the sample. Just my thoughts and also my plan of attack if I find a vein.

Now that I see it coul​d be glacial gold, I'm less likely to crush it. Who knows where the vein came from.

**EDIT: Tried quoting, but my computer is not working so well.**

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I think from what I've been reading it might be a piece of oceanic crust so either at one point in time the location where the rock was found was once ocean floor and is a product of tectonic plate movement.Either way if it was once oceanic crust.It could have been deposited glacially,I think the location in question however may be on the tip or end of the green stone belt so if it is green stone there could very well possibly be a vein.But like I've said before I still haven't found one like it. weather or not there is or isn't a lot of gold in the piece as a project or competition if some more be found, different extraction methods, the most cost effective way,new and more cost effective gold extraction methods could always be discovered could be fun,with the rising importance of gold every little bit may count.

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If you don't own a pan, never panned and don't know what gold looks like, does no good to suggest that.

You need to find someone locally that can identify it.

Won't get done here... pictures are not working on that type of specimen.

A pan costs $8 and there is only one way to learn. Heck, he could use a frisbee, tin cup, or just about anything. Panning is the cheapest way. Throw lead shot in so you know your not losing anything and repan your tailings. Nothing wrong with A10's suggestion.

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Haha thanks alwaysdirty, that was the point I was going for. If your interested in finding gold it's a necessity to have a pan. The whole idea is to wash the lighter stuff off the top of the heavy stuff. If it's gold it will be unmistakable in the pan once the lighter stuff is washed off of it.

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Even more basic is learning to know free gold when you see it...there are plenty of books on the subject.

fred

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If your interested in finding gold it's a necessity to have a pan.

Yup!!!!

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I defiantly would like to get it identified locally, but with the economy the way it is around here I'd probably have to take leaps and bounds and jump through hoops to get er done.Not to mention with industry the way it is.I've been considering grinding it up or a portion of it via bench grinder.If there's a chemical way to extract or if panning is the answer I'm still uncertain. It certainly wouldn't take a whole lot of effort to to pan once all ground up I'm sure with alittle bit of thought taken.

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Take your small peice, put it in a cast iron skillet or anything that can withstand a beating. Crush it with a a hammer. If the rock is very hard try smashing the peices together, they will break eachother. Once you have it down to small pebbles the hammer will smash it no problem. Put the dust in a round baking dish preferably dark colored, pUT in some water then shake it so you have a pile in the edge of the pan with the heavier minerals on bottom. Then just swirl the the water around gently washing the lighter top layers off until you can get a look at what's on the bottom...most your heavy stuff will contain iron and be black/dark colored and if free gold is present it will stand out even if it's tiny.

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Green, black, blue are the best colors to offset gold a dish that's one of those colors gives you your best shot at seeing it, and avoid using aluminum pans because if there's any mercury on the gold it will react with aluminum.

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I know a nice 12" gold pan at Sportsman's Warehouse only cost $5

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New York State retains all mineral rights, so make sure you turn the

gold over to the proper authorities once you get it all separated out.. :th:

Either that or throw it all back on the ground.. Whichever.. :4chsmu1:

Swamp

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I may have to invest in a pan sooner than later I rather do it with atleast alittle rechnology. If your gona do something do it right.The tiny one gram peice may be subject to the crusher I'll keep ya posted.

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if you don't know what it is how will you pick the correct technology? If you do not know what placer gold looks like ??? Crawl, then walk, then run...

The gold pan in various forms has served thousands of prospectors very well...keep it simple.

fred

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I think the ​gold pan has probably survived several thousand years, not just several thousand prospectors. The Romans used sluice boxes to get the concentrates out of streams and used pans to get gold out of the concentrates. Technology has improved on these, but the sluice and pan is the basics of gold recovery in one form or the other.

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. You all seem to have a pretty good idea at what your doing with the pan, This rock may be just the tip of the iceberg literally . I'm gonna crush the small piece at some point here for sure and attempt to pan at least with a Frisbee until the gold pan comes in the mail, that rock is is a little on the hard side its literally like a piece of steel i actually had to cut that little piece off with a hack saw, at one point there i took a 5 pound sledge hammer to it with not much more than a couple scrapes ima try and fashion some type of mortar and pastel i'm sure one way or another ill get er down to size . Boy i bet if i a had a few recruits that knew what they were doing could probably walk away with some gold for sure. I see quite a bit of quarts like the one in the video too. With a little bit of time a patients. I'm eager to start smashing some rocks as much as the next. But who knows when a wicked snow storm could blow through it would be as cold as a witches titty. Who knows when spring time rolls around here on the lake might have to set up camp myself. :Detector::head::snapoutofit:

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Save your tailing to run through a pan when you get it.

Use 40 grit sandpaper to scuff up the inside of your frisbee and pan. It will make little gold catches.

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I got the frisby gona crush it in a coffee can!

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This is about half of that one gram piece in the green Frisbee gold pan, I'm seeing lots of very very fine gold flakes.If it is gold i'm thinking that the pieces are so small that panning might not get you very far.Like i said there are lots and lots of tiny gold colored metal flakes.Far more can be seen with my eye than with the camera. the vid is uploading to you tube will be ready shortly. Here is a pic any way for now.

post-27769-0-53820900-1448492188_thumb.j

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Here is the video keep your eye's on the finer mesh there on the left potion of the screen.Like I said the gold pieces are very tiny and can be seen with the eye a little better.But there does seem to be quite an abundance of them. I'm no expert but i'm thinking chemical extract for this one.

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I'm not sure that there is gold in there. Those little shiny pieces move to easily. Its possible to pan gold even smaller than those. Use tweezer's to squish one of those pieces, if it crumbles your out of luck. If it squishes flat in the tweezers you might be on to something.

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Sorry dude, definitely not gold. Gold moves and acts a certain way in a pan. Keep studying and practicing you will get there.

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Nope... no gold in that pan.

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