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Well boys I was hoping to have photos of a meteor by now. About 6 weeks ago I was at my ranch which is pretty much out in the desert. The sun had just come over the mountains. I was out at the shop and I just turned north and saw what at first thought it was a really big white bird dive bombing. Far as I can tell it was about 1/2 mile to a mile away. So I looked to see if it would come back up if it was a bird dive bombing. But again I've never seen a big white bird ever dive bombing anyways. Lol. Then I realized it was a glowing white meteor. The way it was coming down was so surreal. If it was night then I would of right off knew it was a falling star. But with the sun up it looked like some kind of white thing. I'm thinking it could be as big as a football. It was a pretty big glow and should be a good crater. So about the first month I spent a hour or two at sunrise searching. I kind of stop for a couple weeks I was thinking about just giving up but I started looking again with some new enthusiasm. But I so blew it when it fell I should of really study the spot at where it fell, now I can't remember. I have a good landmark. These big power lines that run across in the area. When I first was looking to see where it fell I was thinking it fell to the right of the one power poles. But now I'm questioning was to the right or the left or even farther to the left or farther to the right. I so blow it. But every time I go I think is this the day I'll found the crater and the meteorite.

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Hello Kim,

The first thing that you should do is report this to the American Meteor Society at http://www.amsmeteors.org/fireballs/fireball-report/ Go to the exact place in which you saw it and try to determine the exact direction you were facing, the starting and end point of the apparent fireball, and absolutely, the exact date and time of the event. I had looked for reports in September in AMSMeteors of an early morning fireball reported from the Phoenix area north and didn't see anything.

It is hopeless to find it without other reports.

About sky distance, you cannot determine distance in the sky by brightness, nor apparent size. Daytime fireballs would go dark or ablate at between 25-35 miles high. Nothing is bright hitting the ground, not even Chelyabinsk. After dark flight the bolide would still travel many miles in the same trajectory. Your apparent angle of descent and last sighting would put it no closer than 45 miles from you, and more likely 65-100 miles away. If it landed it would NOT make a crater, It would be a stone, or multiple stones from fist sized to pebbles somewhere in the mountains between you and Flagstaff. The impact velocity would be the same as dropping rocks from a Cessna airplane, about 150-200 mph.

You will not find it anywhere near where you saw it. You also did not report a sound. You probably did see a rare daytime fireball, but with so few other reports it is most likely permanently lost.

I witnessed my last bolide on 2015-10-02 23:36 MST - 2015-10-03 06:36 UT, see www.AMSMeteors.org for that date. It was the bluest meteor I had ever seen. I have observed 18330 meteors in my lifetime with only a few dozen bolides. I have never seen a daytime fireball, Congratulations!

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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Hey I don't think anybody saw this. Mostly out here it's all desert mostly to the North and East and it only took about 2 seconds to see it. Luckily I text a buddy that morning telling him about it so I have the date. It was August 28 right as the sun came over the hills. And then if someone did see it they most likely wouldn't know to report it like me. But it was glowing white all the way to the ground.

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Thanks Kim,

I've found it on www.amsmeteors.org. on Aug 28, 2015 at 6:37 a.m., about 40 minutes after sunrise. It was reported by 5 other observers in Parump, NV; Enterprise, UT; Lake Havasu, AZ; Flagstaff, AZ; and Munds Lake, AZ. Your report fits the other observational data well. Including your report, IF pieces landed they would be near the Grand Canyon, probably in Arizona about 200 nautical miles north of you. This fits well with your statement that you saw "it was glowing white all the way to the ground". To see it glowing to the ground means that it was over the horizon around 200 miles away from your reported location, Remember, they reach dark flight at 25-35 miles high. The brightness and apparent size is deceptive. Nearly all amateur reports state incorrectly that it was only a few hundred yards in front of them, or nearly hit them. This cannot occur with a visible, lit meteorite.

Congratulations, you definitely saw a daytime fireball. You should send a report in.

I am envious.

billpeters

Edited by billpeters
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But it was glowing white all the way to the ground.

Bill has given you some good advice, but you may have missed one point in particular - it is impossible to see a fireball "all the way to the ground". They slow down enough to stop ionizing the atmosphere many, many, many miles above the ground surface. At this point they have entered "dark flight" and are no longer visible. If you think you saw a glowing object hit the ground what you saw was it passing over the horizon hundreds of miles away.

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