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Advice working tailing piles


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Go along the Perimeter of the Tailing . That is were the Weathered Washed out gold would most likely end up. Go over the Whole Tailings to see if un seen gold was in any host Rock. Moving the Tailing is more work then I think I want to do.

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If you're talking about drywasher tailings here in Arizona, the last stuff they ran, which would be at the top of the pile, was the deepest and richest dirt in the hole. If you're hunting a well-known area like Greaterville, back in the old VLF days the tailings piles were some of the first places the "old time" detectorists hit. Yes, heavier material (like nuggets) might have trickled down deeper into the piles. I've still managed to find nuggets in them but it's rare. It might also help to have a newer detector like a GPZ 7000 that finds deep wiry or specimen nuggets better than the old VLFs.

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I've found lots of gold, big and small, in tailing piles... Seems the largest ones, up to an ounce, have been right on top, and smaller ones deeper ... I've worn out several rakes ... A gold bug 2 and a good rake can keep producing dinks out of the same spot for weeks ...Cheers, Unc

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Just out of curiosity, what kind of tailing pile?

A tailing pile is where someone already went through the material looking for gold but back in the old days they missed a lot because they didnt have the modern equipment available today. Plus the small stuff was of little value way back when.

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I've found lots of gold, big and small, in tailing piles... Seems the largest ones, up to an ounce, have been right on top, and smaller ones deeper ... I've worn out several rakes ... A gold bug 2 and a good rake can keep producing dinks out of the same spot for weeks ...Cheers, Unc

Appreciate that Uncle Ron. It's still overwhelming when I step out of the truck and look around. Helps to have an educated plan. Mark

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You still have not defined what type of tailing pile. Now your making me think our talking about hardrock mine tailings?

These are hard rock mining piles on the hills and hand stacked piles in the washes.

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If I am hunting hardrock tailings I usually use my gold bug 2. Or any VLF just because of the characteristics of the gold. If I'm hunting dredge tailings or any other type of placer tailings I'll us my gold bug and my minelab. I'll pick about a 5 foot wide area of the tailing and just start raking. Eventually you are pretty deep into the pile. Then I move on to the side and start another 5 foot wide area. I usually only take off about 3 inches at a time. I'll usually use my minelab before I start raking then move on to the gold bug. Good luck

Dan.

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If it's chalcopyrite in the tailing piles and hard rock mines, may pay to know the history of mines in that area. Many areas may be lacking free gold, but rich in copper. There would be gold locked up in the copper, but it would have to be removed chemically. Biggest producer of gold in AZ is the copper companies, and gold is taken out of the copper in the final process.

Even around here in Wickenburg although the area has gold, many of the mines were molybdenum, titanium, or some other non-precious metal that was worth much more before large scale strip mining. If minedat says those areas were not gold mines, searching tailing piles in those mines may not yield any gold. Most mines I've been to were tiny one man or a few man operations and are not listed in minedat as having produced gold, if even listed at all. When you say chalcopyrite, it makes me think you were at a copper mine and not a gold mine. The small one man mining operations did not stop because they were making money, they stopped because they were losing money.

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Hello AZMark,

In a hard rock tailing pile that hidden yellow could be anywhere. They would glance at each rock as they chased the vein and toss according to what they saw. A metal detectors going to see what they missed. If you've already found rock with gold in it at that particular mine, then I could only suggest you start moving the whole pile. If you haven't found anything yet by just going over the entire surface, than I would refer to Nugget108's, and Chrisski's posts.

Hard as a rock,

Soft as gold,

Nothing is sweeter,

Ore, so I've been told.

Best Regards,

MetalliKile

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If I am hunting hardrock tailings I usually use my gold bug 2. Or any VLF just because of the characteristics of the gold. If I'm hunting dredge tailings or any other type of placer tailings I'll us my gold bug and my minelab. I'll pick about a 5 foot wide area of the tailing and just start raking. Eventually you are pretty deep into the pile. Then I move on to the side and start another 5 foot wide area. I usually only take off about 3 inches at a time. I'll usually use my minelab before I start raking then move on to the gold bug. Good luck

So Dan, you've had good luck on the hardrock tailings, too? Those large piles look pretty formidable. Maybe I have been walking by some good opportunities.

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I recommend attaching several good sized neodymium magnets to your rake as it will save a lot of time...you won't have to dig as much trash.

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Rod... great post even a spec of iron will mask a small nugget or flake.

I will add; seek out the tailings left by the oldtimers that were using primitive drywashers.

Especially the workings from epithermal hard rock areas for often overlooked eluvial placers.

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Sorry Andy didn't see you asked me a question. Yeah we do good on hard rock tailings also. Of course it depends on the mine and what kind of gold they were producing but I personally like using the GB2 on these types of tailings just because it will pick up the tiniest section of vein material with gold in it. The bigger rock piles you can't rake out obviously but there always seems to be a smaller material pile close by to play in.

Dan

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Dan...Elko is in the vast CARLIN-TREND It is related to the epithermals

as the Epithermal hardrock are found to be CARLIN TYPE... Many old worked out

and overlooked Epithemal hardrock mine dumps are found to have associated free

milling silver/gold alloy (Electrum) placers... But you already know that

as you are in Elko and have access to the Elko Daily Free Press. Just contact

Marianne Kobak Mckown. LOL, if we ever meet the coffee is on you jim

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Jim I would be honored to buy you a cup of coffee. Yeah there are alot of great areas around here. I'm still learning the different districts but we aren't doing too bad. Thank you Jim.

Dan

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