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Meteorite or just a unique chunk of metal?


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I found what I thought was a rock painted metallic. Found that it wasn't painted at all. It's the heaviest object I think I've ever held (2.8 kg or about 6 lbs) and is only palm-sized. I checked it with a cheap refrigerator magnet and there is a slight attraction. I suspect it would be stronger with a better magnet. It's also extremely hard. I tried scraping it on concrete but it didn't phase it in the least. I also notice discolorations when a flash is used. I think it's rust/oxidization. I see a couple of 'thumbprints' as well as ridge lines.

Assuming this is a meteorite (and I don't know) this may have been positioned in the within several other larger pieces as I have those also.

If these images don't show enough detail I have a bunch of others. Also took some videos that show a lot more detail.

post-27692-0-41255100-1441948390_thumb.j

post-27692-0-00298600-1441948392_thumb.j

post-27692-0-56324800-1441948393_thumb.j

post-27692-0-10364800-1441948395_thumb.j

post-27692-0-70163100-1441948396_thumb.j

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Try the inside of a toilet tank lid for a streak test.

Concrete is soft, by comparison.

Also knowing the density would help.

Edited by weaver hillbille
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It's difficult to tell for sure from pictures, the luster looks more like a silica based ore. If you have the means, slab a piece off the flat end and have it professionally full spectrum assayed. There are a lot of different types of valuable mineral deposits, it doesn't have to be gold or silver to net a good profit. Find out for sure what it is. Have it looked at and tested by people you can trust. Do not just throw it aside and forget about it, you could regret that decision later. There are lots of different compositions of meteorites, some are extremely rare, so don't discard that possibility.

Regards,

MetalliKile

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It's difficult to tell for sure from pictures, <snip> There are lots of different compositions of meteorites, some are extremely rare, so don't discard that possibility.

It is not difficult at all in this regard and the possibility you mention can be throw out here; this is clearly not a meteorite of any sort.

This is a link to an image on google that looks close to your picture.

That's an iron meteorite, it looks as much like the rock here as an apple does an orange.

Edited by Mikestang
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The rock leaves a dark charcoal gray scratch on the back side of a toilet tank top.

I have arranged with a local High School science teacher to check the density. I will update this post once that is done.

I was considering having this rock/piece of metal cut so that the inside is visible. Quite a few articles indicate that cutting open a meteorite always increases its value, but I go by rules of coin and antique collectors so I am very hesitant about cutting anything... Do you have an opinion as to where or how to cut a rock like this? I mean, cut it in half or just cut a small portion off of it?

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I tried to take images in different lighting. This 'rock' is peculiar in how it reacts to light.

IMO, the best visuals of this rock are in some .MOV videos I took with my iPhone. One of the videos was taken with regular incandescent ceiling lighting. The other video was taken with my iPhone flash turned on. Unfortunately, this forum does not allow uploading videos? I have them on my Google Drive share as well as dozens of other images - if anyone would like to look at them? By far, the videos demonstrate far more detail that raises questions for me - like, what kind of rock has tiny flecks with flat surfaces like this? There is also a better visual of what appear to be thumbprints.

I don't discredit anyone that says this is not a meteorite... I know nothing. The flat surface of this rock is identical to the surface of an old worn US nickel.

Although it leaves a dark charcoal gray mark on the back of a toilet seat top, I have challenged a couple of friends to try to make a scratch in it using a steak knife, screwdriver or pair of scissors. It just can't be phased. Whatever it is it is very hard.

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I was considering having this rock/piece of metal cut so that the inside is visible. Quite a few articles indicate that cutting open a meteorite always increases its value, but I go by rules of coin and antique collectors so I am very hesitant about cutting anything... Do you have an opinion as to where or how to cut a rock like this? I mean, cut it in half or just cut a small portion off of it?

Cutting a meteorite does not increase or decrease its value.

Any rock saw would work, just cut a little piece off or cut it in half, in this case it doesn't matter. If you just want to see the inside use sand paper/whet stone/diamond file and make a small window on a relatively flat spot on the rock.

For a meteorite that's going to be classified you would only cut off what you need for the type specimen and thin section.

I have arranged with a local High School science teacher to check the density. I will update this post once that is done.

Do it yourself.

1) Record mass of dry rock, A

2) Fill a container with distilled water enough to submerge and cover the rock, put this container on the balance and zero it.

3) Suspend your rock on a thin thread and submerge it in the water. Do not let the rock touch the bottom or sides of the container

4) Record mass of wet suspended rock, B.

5) Bulk density = A/B

Edited by Mikestang
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Mike,

I was soliciting opinions and I would probably value yours more if you would stop trying to spark debate without presenting any substantive matter of your own. For example, I don't know what else to call it since nobody has exactly identified it yet. Is it a "rock"? Maybe a "chunk of metal"? Or should I refer to it as a "meteor-wrong" right off the bat? That would moot this posting entirely. I'm not any more qualified to call this a "meteor-wrong" than a "meteorite". If I knew this was a meteorite I wouldn't have made this post. It serves me no purpose to demand that this is a meteorite. I only call it that loosely for lack of a better identifier. Thing is, I think you know that already, so what's your point? Do you wish this post to be closed because you say "Not a meteorite"?

If your opinion(s) contain no more substance than "not a meteorite" I'm not sure we need to hear it in response to every post made. I would be all ears if you would elaborate on how you come to your conclusion. You haven't provided any basis that might persuade anybody. This makes it easy for you to escape comments that might debate you or even scold you for including a URL that was possibly unclear to some of us.

I have made note of how you prefer URLs to be referenced. Perhaps you can provide me with a term to refer to the object in my pictures? One step better would be a URL that could help identify what this is. Have you seen any images of similar findings?

I'm not saying you don't know what you're talking about. Heck, I considered maybe an autoresponder would be in order - "Not a meteorite and you shouldn't call it one" or "Everywhere I go I see the same rocks". *grin* A guy would be right 99.99% of the time, even me, right? :S

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I see many visual similarities between the 'object' I found and of a meteorite known as Campo del Cielo:

http://meteorites.wustl.edu/id/Campo_del_Cielo_5549.jpg

I also see differences that I can't explain and a trained eye could distinguish. I also see a similar 'object' in the 3rd image on this page:

http://earthphysicsteaching.homestead.com/geological_oddities_and_rarities.html

An oddity, rarity? I'm not sure what this would mean. Meteorites are oddities and rare? Still very curious to identify this.

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If your opinion(s) contain no more substance than "not a meteorite" I'm not sure we need to hear it in response to every post made. I would be all ears if you would elaborate on how you come to your conclusion. You haven't provided any basis that might persuade anybody.

Sorry, I don't have time to give a meteorite 101 class to every picture of a weird rock that gets posted. I'm not here to persuade, I know what a meteorite looks like from handling them for 30 years and when I see one that's obviously not I post my opinion. Don't believe me, I don't care, but I'll still keep singing the same song if folks keep insisting some odd mineral is a meteorite.

I'm not trying to spark debates, just trying to cull the bs. There's a couple threads here when the exact same crap has been brought up about me, and you know what? None of those people post here any more because they don't give a crap about meteorites. I imagine after this thread runs its course you'll never come back here, either.

I am not the ambassador to the hobby of meteorite hunting and collecting and I don't have time to teach every Tom, Dick, and Harry about meteorite basics in every single "is this a meteorite" post on the web. Spend a few years and learn what meteorites are or take my word at what I see, but don't ask for an opinion and then question my response.

If something looks questionable for any reason I'll always suggest to have it looked at in person. For many rocks, such as yours, this step is unnecessary as a photograph shows all you need to see.

Call it what you know it is, a "mysterious rock".

Yes, an auto response "not a meteorite" would be correct 99.9999999999% of the time because meteorites are very rare and for someone to simply stumble upon one that has no clue about meteorites is almost unheard of, so 99.99999999999% of the time what they have is an Earth rock. I know of two occasions in the history of the internet where a mystery rock posted in a forum turned out to be a meteorite. I know of thousands and thousands of mystery rock "is this a meteorite" posts.

Google "black shiny rock mineral" and I'm sure you'll be able to figure out what your rock is: https://www.google.com/search?q=black+shiny+rock+mineral

Show it to a geologist or post it in the mineral section here, you should get an answer. Could be a gneiss or chromite or magnetite.

You'll find several ID charts such as http://www.minsocam.org/msa/collectors_corner/id/mineral_id_keytib.htm that can help.

I'll turn this around on you, how about you post up all the research you did as to why you think it's a meteorite. All you did was make as assumption. What did you base it on? What tests did you perform? What books have you read? How many meteorites do you own? How many have you seen in person? How many have you studied in person?

Comparing pictures on the internet is not meteorite identification.

Tough love,

Mike

Edited by Mikestang
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I gotta back Mike on this one. Big black steak on your toilet! look man how much homework did you do before posting ? At best call it a suspect meteorite, not that it is and please try some research it's not that hard and there is tons of info on how to ID your rocks.

more love from

hardtimehermit

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This is neither a meteorite, nor a unique chunk of metal.

Obviously not, when the finder admits in his original post that he "has a bunch of others".

These "rocks" aren't unique (in SoCal), not when you can walk along train-tracks and fill a bucket before you have walked a mile.

I know, because I've done it.

And I suspect the finder did the very same thing, unless he works in the metal-alloys industry.

Do a Google Search on "ferro manganese slag":

http://tinyurl.com/ferromanganese

At least 9 of the images are mine from the various articles I have written on this particular meteor-wrong.

I'm somewhat disappointed this m-wrong wasn't nailed sooner in this thread.

Bob V.

http://meteorite-recovery.tripod.com/2009/jul09.htm

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