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Obama, by an executive order declared the San Gabriel Mountains a National Monument last October


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Just thought I would pass this along since it came to my attention recently...(p.s. I don't get on here as often since I find it to be mildly depressing since I'm out of detecting for now)

"Not far from sunny Los Angeles, California stand the San Gabriel Mountain Range. The San Gabriel River has yielded a significant amount of placer gold, over 100,000 ounces, since 1874. Because of its easy and convenient access, this location has become a very popular spot for local prospectors, but now that's all set to change...

Obama, by an executive order declared the San Gabriel Mountains a National Monument last October. The monument covers 350,000 acres and will restrict or ban prospecting and mining. This federal land grab isn't over yet.

The Angeles National Forest is developing a management plan for the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument as required by Presidential Proclamation. The Proclamation encourages the Forest Service to maximize public involvement in the development of this management plan.

Public meetings on the San Gabriel Mountains National Monument will be held at the following times and locations. You can also submit your comments online.

June 22, 4 – 8 p.m. – Pacific Community Center, 501 S. Pacific Ave., Glendale, CA 91204

June 23, 4 – 8 p.m. – Palmdale Legacy Commons Senior Center, 930 E. Ave. Q9, Palmdale, CA 93550

June 24, 4 – 8 p.m. – Glendora Public Library, 140 S. Glendora Ave., Glendora, CA 91741

June 25, 3 – 8 p.m. – Pico House, 424 N. Main St., Los Angeles, CA 90012

June 26, 4 – 8 p.m. – Big Pines Lodge, 24537 Big Pines Hwy (at Hwy 2
Junction), Wrightwood, CA 92397

If you can’t make the meetings, you can read all the documentation online as well as register your public comment via mail or email.

More info can be found here":

http://www.fs.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsinternet/%21ut/p/c5/04_SB8K8xLLM9MSSzPy8xBz9CP0os3gDfxMDT8MwRydLA1cj72BTUwMTAwgAykeaxRtBeY4WBv4eHmF-YT4GMHkidBvgAI6EdIeDXIvfdrAJuM3388jPTdUvyA2NMMgyUQQAyrgQmg%21%21/dl3/d3/L2dJQSEvUUt3QS9ZQnZ3LzZfS000MjZOMDcxT1RVODBJN0o2MTJQRDMwODQ%21/?project=46964

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With out the States OK, it meaningless. He does NOT have the powers. Sense when can the feds just Take State lands?

Edited by homefire
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The San Gabriel Mountains in the area of discussion mostly is and has been federally, not state, owned. I believe much of it was withdrawn from mineral entry a long time ago -- like prior to the Great Depression, although that withdrawal designation was largely ignored and only sporadically enforced over the years until just the last decade or two. During the Great Depression large numbers of the unemployed camped in the East Fork portion of the forest and eked out a living mostly by placer gold recovery. In fact, the California Division of Mines conducted a study in the 1940s that estimated a full 90% of the entire able bodied male population of California engaged in some form of gold recovery activities throughout the state at least on a part-time basis during the 1933-1934 period. Forest Service personnel -- unlike today -- largely overlooked these efforts. A number of mining claims that pre-existed the withdrawal designation were grandfathered. I enjoyed some panning, sluicing, detecting and even occasional dredging at the East Fork, but I stopped going there largely because of how overcrowded it became on weekends and holiday periods with people who essentially trashed the area, got stoned on drugs, ignored wilderness etiquette and the common decencies, occasionally brandished and drunkenly fired guns despite nearby bystanders and children and just generally posed a constant fire and trampling hazard in a narrow, confined place that could not possibly accommodate an emergency escape for the thousands who gathered there. I doubt the National Monument designation will result in much of a significant change in the behavior of the overwhelmingly urban weekend crowds short of some miraculous epiphany. Unfortunately, it will be the easy targets -- like panners or sluicers -- who will get the headlines.

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  • 1 year later...

Any update on this?  Mostly when it goes into effect...

 

A memo at http://a123.g.akamai.net/7/123/11558/abc123/forestservic.download.akamai.com/11558/www/nepa/101660_FSPLT3_3046169.pdf lists a website for further info, but the link doesn't work: www.fs.usda.gov/projects/?=Project=46964.  Can't easily find anything new on the website.

 

Just returned from a trip there, and as someone from AZ, I must say, putting a sluice in a river is very relaxing.  I went a little over 2 miles, half way to the Bridge to Nowhere, but all our sampling turned up nothing worthwhile.  The take from the trip was four letter on a penny sized garnets and a tiny speck of wire gold.  We sampled four areas, and took at least a dozen samples in each area, from the river bed, rivers edge, and Cliffside.  The place has been so worked in the years that it has been open that the easy to get to stuff is all gone.  My last trip there, four years ago, met a guy who claimed to have went 14 miles up the river for a week and came back with some respectable gold, maybe a quarter ounce or so,

 

I did have a great time on the trip despite the near skunk, and hope this place stays open a long time.

 

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:2mo5pow::th::Just_Cuz_06: by by by my my my dirty totten (*&^%$# -killing mining is insanity. Fallows Camp(not allowed to rebuild) was a righteous place to train folks, test new equipment designs, great gold shows, good dining and cold beer and plenty of cheer. NOW there will be nowhere to take kids for free so on the street in boredom for crime/drugs to reign supreme. This country is in deep kakaka-John

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Well the East Fork would definitely be in the national monument.

HJ--If it's any consolation, I was up there on a summer Thursday - Saturday and the only non-adult I saw on the trails or prospecting was my son.  I did see about a dozen kids in Camp Williams camping in the tents.  Don't think they can close down that piece of private property or bar access to it either.

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The Prospectors Club of Southern California was scheduled to support the big summer Scouting event at Camp Williams in late June as they have done for quite a few years in a row, but the recent forest fire shut down access to the entire area.

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GREAT old PCSC always has done a righteous job. Is this Camp Williams on the old Follows camp spot or new area?? Have numerous Gkids in LA and when there I drag out to the boonies and take their electronic garbage away so they don't walk off a cliff or on a snake. Like yesterday up here...idiots(gdaughter boyfriend) plays with the friggn' thing all the time---John

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Hoser John--Not sure where the old Follows is, but my google search turns up that it is different.  Camp Williams is on the East Fork Road, about a half mile after it splits to Shoemaker Canyon Road, and about two miles before the parking at the end of East Fork Road.  There is a campsite with cabins across the river that is not part of Camp Williams.  Camp Williams has been private property since before the area was a national forest.  It's also a trailer park with a school bus stop.  They can hold up to a 35' trailer at $595 per month plus electricity.  Some of the trailers on site had been there a while and are not new construction.

 

The camp ground alone is a fun spot.

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Follows Camp was such a nice place to meet mining friends , before heading out we would enjoy a great breakfast and coffee at the restaurant.  The old rock fireplace would keep us warm as we chug hot coffee and spin prospecting yarns. After, we would get in our cars and head out to do some nuggethunting at some secret gulch or sluice in the river. The miners of the East Fork all knew each other or were at least familiar who worked what area. Although I lived an hour and a half from the East Fork , I could not wait for Friday to come so I could do that drive and meet some good friends and just enjoy our favorite activity. Pat and Mark Keene would test their new sluices and high bankers, in fact Jerry Hobbs and I tested a large 8 inch subaru powered sluice customized for an operation in Northern California. We had to use a 6 inch to dig a deep hole so we could back up the monster dredge...great memories they were. We had trash clean up days throughout  the year, sponsored  by prospectors clubs because of the mess the weekend crowds made. Never understood how people would just leave dirty diapers in the sand when their was a trash can just a few feet from them. Regardless, I considered the prospectors the stewards of that river..they were there doing what they enjoyed and made sure they cleaned up their own trash and others. Considering California mining history , its bogus that our government wants to destroy this heritage, step by step they take away someones rights. The pursuit of happiness is slowly diminishing in our country. Perhaps the future citizens will just stay indoors and play virtual reality games in their living rooms, drink their alcohol and live that blissful life not caring what our government does to them. I for one will continue overtly or covertly....doing what I enjoy and that's keep pursuing my happiness, in  the great outdoors....diggin gold. Hope you all do too...Happy Hunting.  

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The President can create all the National Monuments he wants but they are only pieces of paper until congress funds them. Congress has not funded the monument so no one does any planning or enforcement.

Until some money gets approved by your congresscritters don't expect much in the way of updates to the website.

A smart prospector might want to make their feelings known to their own congresscritters. Congress can also fund a monument but put restrictions on how the money is spent.  :brows:

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  • 5 months later...

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