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For those looking to get into the hobby of detecting for nuggets


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There are going to be those that do not agree with what I have to say, and there may be some that do! Regardless, I am going to give my honest opinion on this hobby to those who may be looking to get involved in it.

Metal detecting for gold nuggets can be a fun and exciting hobby, IF you have what is needed to get the job done right. I am not talking about the newest $10k gold detector, or the newest $2k drywasher. What I am talking about is a very deep understanding of Geology, a (theoretically) endless amount of money, a very reliable off-road vehicle (Jeep, Quad, or Razr/Rhino), and THOUSANDS OF HOURS of free time. The lure of gold is very strong and very real, but finding it is very difficult without the things I mentioned previously. Sure, there are those who are lucky enough to live in an area where gold is found frequently. However, if you live in Southern California, prepare to spend 99.9% of your time digging trash, ammo, and virtually every kind of metal EXCEPT gold. Over the past decade or so I have become more anti-Government than I thought I ever would become. I used to despise the thought of the BLM coming in and closing off public land. But after spending the last 4 years metal detecting, I am finding myself becoming a little more open to these closures.

The reason: A vast majority of prospectors (NOT ALL) are complete slobs and have no respect for the land. This seems to be a bigger issue in California than in other states, in my experience. It is absolutely disheartening to go to an area where gold is known to have been found and spend all day digging up nails, bullets, bottle caps, old wire, tin cans, staples, aluminum foil, birdshot, Capri Sun containers...and the list goes on and on and on. On top of that they throw their paper trash, glass bottles, leftover food and other items right there where they are working and leave. Don't get me wrong, you will ALWAYS have to dig a little trash when you are metal detecting, but to have it at the extent it is nowadays is ridiculous. So the only way you are really going to stand a chance is to go somewhere that no one else has been. This is where it gets difficult. There are plenty of areas out there that carry gold that have not been found yet. It is a fact! The problem is, if you do not know what to look for then you might as well be detecting in a Wal-Mart parking lot. The information for finding new areas is certainly out there, but unless you have a decent understanding of Geological terms and conditions, you will only find them with an amazing stroke of luck.

I have run into numerous new hunters while out on my ventures. They ask how long I have been in the hobby, and I tell them going on 5 years. The next general question is: Where is the best place to go? That is a question that every detectorist has been asked by a newbie at some point in time. My response, sadly, is that I have no clue. Obviously they are curious as to why I have been in for so long and don't know much, so I tell them the truth....I don't know anything about Geology so I don't know what to look for while scouting for a new area. This, and knowing how to do proper research is key to finding gold. Unfortunately, if you are not already in the know on these subjects your chance of success plummets drastically. So if you want to be successful at gold detecting, find and take a college class on Geology. DO NOT rely on other prospectors to give you any "real" help. Gold is one of the most powerful things in existence. It can literally make an honest man cheat, make your best friend your worst enemy, and vice versa....turn your worst enemy into your best friend (temporarily, of course). Don't be fooled by those that tell you that they will "Share" info with you. If you are a newbie you will have no idea if what you are being told is the truth or otherwise. Gold is the "Seed of Greed". I have fell for that move a few times because I am one of those people that believe that most people are good and honest folk. Not in the gold business. I have taken people to a location where I have found meteorites and shown them where to look. In most cases, they found a meteorite or two. A couple of them found their very first meteorite ever because I showed them where to look and what to look for to improve their chances. I was promised trips to their spots where they find gold, or their meteorite sweet spots in return (which they offered, I never asked) but of course once they found what they wanted they disappeared. Don't fall for it!! If you are lucky enough to find a spot that produces for you...KEEP IT TO YOURSELF!!!

Lastly....equipment!!! Do not let anybody convince you that you need to have the latest and greatest machines to find the gold. That is simply a lie. Do they help? Of course they do...IF you know where to go to use them, and you know how to use them correctly. I have spent well over $15,000 on prospecting gear over the last 4+ years and it has been a colossal waste of money! Why? Because again, knowing where to go and what to look for is the key. Some will tell you that you just need to learn how to use your machine, and they are correct. learning your equipment is vital to using it successfully. But when you are like me and you have got to where you can find paperclips two feet deep, and pieces of wire brush (guessing, but that size) at the same depth, I'd say I am using the machine quite well. LOL. Sure, buying the best and most expensive is always a good thing in my opinion. You're buying a good product, it does slightly increase your chance of success, and it certainly keeps the dealers and manufacturers happy. But refrain from doing that until you are ready both financially and knowledgeably. Don't do like I did and just start throwing cash at dealers for the top of the line stuff with absolutely no clue of how and where to use it.

Now there ARE some really good people in this hobby. You will find quite a few of them on this and Bill Southern's forums. And there is some really useful books and educational materials out there as well that can point you in the right direction. Chris Ralph's: Fists Full of Gold is a great informational item. Anything written by Jim Straight is a MUST HAVE as well. Just remember that if you get Jim's books to pick up a very good dictionary, or Glossary of Geological terms to go with them. Jim is old school and uses a lot of big, but important, words in his writings. It can be hard to understand at first, but the man is a genius when it comes to this stuff so learn what he has to say and put it to use. Good luck out there and don't give up. It can be extremely frustrating to go out time after time after time and come home empty handed. One day you WONT come home empty handed and you will be hooked forever!!!!!

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All sound like sound words to me. I too trust to often and never met a stranger. I don't however expect anyone to take me to their honey hole but simply look to detect with others in general areas or new to them as well to learn tips and machine etc.

In these forums you can learn much on diff minerals associated with gold etc. if you read it and take it in. Decifer what is being said. And yeah it's a long walk with out a good off road vehicle. Your words are well put to me, makes sense. Thanks for taking the time.

Too late though I'm hooked already lol

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Yep as I have said over and over in my seminars, here, and at my site one must learn to do the research required to get into productive areas. There is nothing easy about mining with a metal detector and every nugget is hard earned. I have watch many folks buy equipment over the years only to learn this and give up. It took me a full year just to find my first nugget and this was back in the early 1990s when there were still many nuggets being found in the popular gold fields. Why? I did not believe in myself or my detector as well as not actually doing the research required to find gold in the areas I was working.

Once I actually started to spend the time learning about the placer deposits in the area I was working and how they came to be there as well as how the old timers worked the area it was like being handed a key and I began to find gold! Then I started to apply my system to other areas including some areas not as extensively worked by other miners and my finds increased along with my knowledge of how to locate my own areas. Learning to find gold on your own is the only real way to become successful in this business.

Yep I could have quit long ago when I began to find out many of the things mentioned above, but I only became more determined to be able to learn the secrets of locating and working placer ground others are now willing to take the time to locate and yep I keep these areas mostly to myself and share with a few that have helped me over the years that I know can handle knowing of a new area without having the greedy urge to return without me to clean the area out. Yes I learned the hard way more than once to not share info with anyone I do not know well by having areas raked, piled, and cleaned out by folks I once considered friends I was only trying to help get them on gold.

I now as always am willing to help others how to learn to do the research, mapping, and some related geology, but not to hold someone's hand and get them over gold. Taking someone to a spot and telling them to hunt it is not teaching them a damn thing except that you can find gold for them, but teaching someone to do the research to find their own is priceless. Problem many are not willing to spend the many hours needed both in books and on the ground with maps to find new areas. Then many that do get that far quit due to not finding anything right away and leave an area that would indeed have paid off for them.

Nope nothing easy about this, but I am constantly successful in my hunts and it is because I am willing to spend the time finding the gold first as your detector is simply a recovery tool used after the gold is found right? I mean if you do not get yourself into a good area with detectable gold you will find nothing. I also have some close friends that I share info with since they have done the same over the years and have found some nice gold at the end of a pointy finger I always return if I can.

I am passionate about nugget shooting and have spent years helping others learn how to learn and will continue to do so because the key is knowledge and learning how to apply it!

So I agree not an easy business gold detecting

For this reason it drives me and I like the challenge

I use the best equipment I can afford because it just makes good since

I do not depend on others to help me most of the time

And I find gold.

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It has been said "detecting" is the HARDEST form of prospecting for gold.
That's WHY I CHOSE IT .
YES a person can go out to known gold bearing areas and with a drywasher , wetwasher, a pan and find gold on a regular basis.
It may not be nugget form but none the less its gold.

I have ALWAYS been known to do things "the hard way" but when it comes to detecting for nuggets theres NOTHING like it.
New detector , old detector as long as it works pit it with perseverance and go for it.


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As with ANY hobby you get into, there are several routs you can take. All hobbies have a high, middle and low road on costs. Hunting, fishing and even prospecting of all kinds are the same. All have expensive gear and they all have midrange and cheap gear. As with all hobbies, it is up to the individual to set their levels of expenditures. I know guys that find gold with low end detectors and other equipment. And we all know guys who buy the most expensive equipment available and yet they don't do very well at all. Hunting is the same way, you can have cheaper gear and do well or you can have the highest quality of gear and do just as good as the feller with the cheap gear. It all comes down to what you can afford and how much time you invest into your hobbie. Knowledge is gold with anything you do. Whether it's researching and scouting for that big buck or scouting for that big nugget, boots on the ground is key. Not money in my eyes. Just my opinion.

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A loner with gold is alone with his gold.

I don't need to be a loner. That is why I joined some clubs (5+) and got a few friends to hear my rants (some about gold).

I enjoy seeing your gold and I hope you enjoy seeing mine.

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Chris,

If you could pass on some geological tips about Barstow, I'd appreciate it. I had a trip there and to me it looked like the second most boring place geologically I've ever been to. I did not have time to prospect on that trip, but am likely headed back there in a few weeks and would like to make some time this trip to prospect.

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Another good rant courtesy of Bill... nice wordsmithing. :thumbsupanim

Just for s**ts and giggles, I pulled up some geology maps of the Barstow area and I could only find a couple places that would be of interest to me in prospecting. Given the communist state of CA, those areas I would prospect are probably off limits anyway. :idunno:

Glad I'm in AZ... I've got enough areas to prospect right in my own back yard to last me for a lifetime. :yesss:

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Chris, perseverance and a positive attitude is most important in this hobby. Detecting for gold is just plain hard to do and you are right about the equipment, but I'll bet Gold Bugs have found more gold than any other single detector, the key with equipment is learning it to the best of your ability. I don't think most prospectors are slobs but just the opposite. Even up here in the Northern Motherlode my nugget to trash ratio must be 100-1, that's just the way it is. Yes, I have found a patch that is all gold and no trash, but that is friggin RARE! Also remember that 95% of the gold is found by 5% of the people, I myself am in the 95% that find less but I strive to be near the top of that group..........research research..... but I go with the old saying, go where gold has been found before. We are lucky to live in a state that is nearly 900 miles long and North to South there is gold most of the way from the Mex border up to the Oregon border........

Keep at it and remember it is a hobby.

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Hi Chris,

Knowing you personally, I know your a good guy. You have the determination. If you ever want some of my research techniques you know how to get ahold of me.

Dave.

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Hey Chris I wasn't trying to be an ass so don't take it that way, but I have really never figured it was all gone and when I need a good spot to hunt I go find one. Nope not easy and if Dave is willing to share some of his stuff too jump at that offer cause he has skilz too. I am a little nuts I guess and like the challenge of getting gold even with the odds stacked against me and the cost is not important compared to the satisfaction of planning, plotting, tracking, and tagging my quarry....

Guess I am just to hard headed to give up and still think on day I will walk over (and dig) a fricking 57 Chevy sized nugget....

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Chris, real sorry you feel that way, but it ain't right. I live in this BS state and a lot of stupid people believe like you. There is bigger and better gold here in CA, but, in my opinion, not worth the BS. I enjoy going to AZ in the winter. Have a lot of friends that way and if I can come close to paying for fuel, I'm a happy boy. Don't pump anyone for their old hotspots, but when offered, I'll share what I know.

Still working for myself, so any gold found is a plus. Friends found worth more than any gold.

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Can I get an AMEN? :thumbsupanim

There are going to be those that do not agree with what I have to say, and there may be some that do! Regardless, I am going to give my honest opinion on this hobby to those who may be looking to get involved in it.

Metal detecting for gold nuggets can be a fun and exciting hobby, IF you have what is needed to get the job done right. I am not talking about the newest $10k gold detector, or the newest $2k drywasher. What I am talking about is a very deep understanding of Geology, a (theoretically) endless amount of money, a very reliable off-road vehicle (Jeep, Quad, or Razr/Rhino), and THOUSANDS OF HOURS of free time. The lure of gold is very strong and very real, but finding it is very difficult without the things I mentioned previously. Sure, there are those who are lucky enough to live in an area where gold is found frequently. However, if you live in Southern California, prepare to spend 99.9% of your time digging trash, ammo, and virtually every kind of metal EXCEPT gold. Over the past decade or so I have become more anti-Government than I thought I ever would become. I used to despise the thought of the BLM coming in and closing off public land. But after spending the last 4 years metal detecting, I am finding myself becoming a little more open to these closures.

The reason: A vast majority of prospectors (NOT ALL) are complete slobs and have no respect for the land. This seems to be a bigger issue in California than in other states, in my experience. It is absolutely disheartening to go to an area where gold is known to have been found and spend all day digging up nails, bullets, bottle caps, old wire, tin cans, staples, aluminum foil, birdshot, Capri Sun containers...and the list goes on and on and on. On top of that they throw their paper trash, glass bottles, leftover food and other items right there where they are working and leave. Don't get me wrong, you will ALWAYS have to dig a little trash when you are metal detecting, but to have it at the extent it is nowadays is ridiculous. So the only way you are really going to stand a chance is to go somewhere that no one else has been. This is where it gets difficult. There are plenty of areas out there that carry gold that have not been found yet. It is a fact! The problem is, if you do not know what to look for then you might as well be detecting in a Wal-Mart parking lot. The information for finding new areas is certainly out there, but unless you have a decent understanding of Geological terms and conditions, you will only find them with an amazing stroke of luck.

I have run into numerous new hunters while out on my ventures. They ask how long I have been in the hobby, and I tell them going on 5 years. The next general question is: Where is the best place to go? That is a question that every detectorist has been asked by a newbie at some point in time. My response, sadly, is that I have no clue. Obviously they are curious as to why I have been in for so long and don't know much, so I tell them the truth....I don't know anything about Geology so I don't know what to look for while scouting for a new area. This, and knowing how to do proper research is key to finding gold. Unfortunately, if you are not already in the know on these subjects your chance of success plummets drastically. So if you want to be successful at gold detecting, find and take a college class on Geology. DO NOT rely on other prospectors to give you any "real" help. Gold is one of the most powerful things in existence. It can literally make an honest man cheat, make your best friend your worst enemy, and vice versa....turn your worst enemy into your best friend (temporarily, of course). Don't be fooled by those that tell you that they will "Share" info with you. If you are a newbie you will have no idea if what you are being told is the truth or otherwise. Gold is the "Seed of Greed". I have fell for that move a few times because I am one of those people that believe that most people are good and honest folk. Not in the gold business. I have taken people to a location where I have found meteorites and shown them where to look. In most cases, they found a meteorite or two. A couple of them found their very first meteorite ever because I showed them where to look and what to look for to improve their chances. I was promised trips to their spots where they find gold, or their meteorite sweet spots in return (which they offered, I never asked) but of course once they found what they wanted they disappeared. Don't fall for it!! If you are lucky enough to find a spot that produces for you...KEEP IT TO YOURSELF!!!

Lastly....equipment!!! Do not let anybody convince you that you need to have the latest and greatest machines to find the gold. That is simply a lie. Do they help? Of course they do...IF you know where to go to use them, and you know how to use them correctly. I have spent well over $15,000 on prospecting gear over the last 4+ years and it has been a colossal waste of money! Why? Because again, knowing where to go and what to look for is the key. Some will tell you that you just need to learn how to use your machine, and they are correct. learning your equipment is vital to using it successfully. But when you are like me and you have got to where you can find paperclips two feet deep, and pieces of wire brush (guessing, but that size) at the same depth, I'd say I am using the machine quite well. LOL. Sure, buying the best and most expensive is always a good thing in my opinion. You're buying a good product, it does slightly increase your chance of success, and it certainly keeps the dealers and manufacturers happy. But refrain from doing that until you are ready both financially and knowledgeably. Don't do like I did and just start throwing cash at dealers for the top of the line stuff with absolutely no clue of how and where to use it.

Now there ARE some really good people in this hobby. You will find quite a few of them on this and Bill Southern's forums. And there is some really useful books and educational materials out there as well that can point you in the right direction. Chris Ralph's: Fists Full of Gold is a great informational item. Anything written by Jim Straight is a MUST HAVE as well. Just remember that if you get Jim's books to pick up a very good dictionary, or Glossary of Geological terms to go with them. Jim is old school and uses a lot of big, but important, words in his writings. It can be hard to understand at first, but the man is a genius when it comes to this stuff so learn what he has to say and put it to use. Good luck out there and don't give up. It can be extremely frustrating to go out time after time after time and come home empty handed. One day you WONT come home empty handed and you will be hooked forever!!!!!

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Thing is if it is so dang hard to find gold, pay for your equipment with gold found, and still have fun how come so many are doing it successfully? Seriously ya think they got magic, or a super secret map, or something? Nope what they got is the willingness to work hard and succeed and you DO NOT have to learn years worth geology to acheive this. OK I use geological maps yes... But I have NO geological schooling except what I have shoved into my own head at home reading! The geological maps are in color and I overlay them onto maps showing placer deposits in a particular state. Now I look at color patterns and their relationships to gold deposits in that state. I then use that as a guide.... Just one of my secrets I share and with Google Earth used next to search the terrain I am well on the trail.

Teach yourself to teach yourself....

This I learned from several when I felt defeated by reading and asking and the most important and understandable was my good friend Jim Straight He opened my eyes with a lifetime of shared knowledge and I also now try to follow his example though my delevery methods may perhaps be a bit crustier....

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Bill, I tend to agree with you regarding not-needing a geological background to be successful in finding gold, But I also agree full-heartedly with all the other points that Chris brought out,... I think that he is Dead-on in that respect. Being Successful in this gold-chasing-hobby in not determined, nor should it be measured by the newest technological medal detector one has. Considering that humans do not have bionic-capabilities (eyes) to find gold, a detector is just a tool that accomplishes this task for them. But it is not the detector that makes the "Man", nor the success of that man. Success in this challenging pursuit comes as a result of our abilities ("If" we use them) to utilize not only our brain with research, but to also rationalize differing-situations that would affect the positioning and placement of gold. By standing in the middle of a wash for example, and placing yourself in the position of a nugget, ...where might you land or come to rest given the environment and conditions of that stretch of wash? Are there boulders or roots to consider? Is there a band of bedrock on both sides of the wash, but nothing showing in the wash (curious,... maybe that bedrock also-extends across the wash, but is covered by overburden). Does the grade of the wash trend downward on one side more than the other, which would force heaver objects in that direction? Is the bedrock scoured and exposed on one side of the wash with a large rock and boulder berm more in the center of the wash ( curious, maybe the main wash (at one time) flowed down the center where that berm is, left that berm, and then at a later rain-torrent-event that berm forced the water to change direction and scour the bedrock on the bank. But where would the gold be held???.. It's most likely under that berm. And what if there is exposed bedrock upstream, but nothing but sand and rock showing in the wash for a long stretch below it,... might there also be bedrock covered by overberdon with gold hiding there??? These are but a few rational considerations that anyone who desires to be a successful detectorist "should-consider", and they have absolutely nothing to do with how technologically advanced medal detector one has.

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Many variables exist which influence one's level of success in the goldfields. Some, but certainly not all, have been mentioned in the forgoing posts. No, you don't need to spend 10k on a detector to find gold. In the past 10 years I and my 3 detecting partners have found about 20,000 nuggets with a model of detector retailing for $799.95. And, MOST of the gold I have found was found in the past with machines which retailed for an average of $599.95. In reality success in the goldfields is due not so much as to the MODEL of (suitable) detector employed but rather due to the skill, optimism, perseverance, and concentration of the detector OPERATOR. Under most circumstances a skilled operator using a old Goldmaster or Goldbug will SMOKE a novice using the most expensive equipment available. As for needing an extensive knowledge of geology, sorry, I disagree. YES, a working knowledge of auriferous geology is good, but remember, "Gold is where you find it." To quote from "Advanced Nuggetshooting" "... It is a good idea to concentrate your efforts in or near those areas where gold has been found in the past. The reason is simple: the combined efforts of past generations of prospectors and miners have pretty much located all of the major gold-bearing regions. Virtually every gold-bearing area, of any real size, have already been located, mapped, and worked..." Thus, rather than trying to find those rare "virgin" areas you will find FAR more gold by frequenting KNOWN auriferous areas. True, areas which have been "hammered" are less productive now than in the past, but such gold-bearing areas are ALWAYS more productive than NON gold-bearing areas. Yes, to find gold we will have to employ greater skill, optimism, perseverance, concentration AND more labor, imagination and in some cases better technology. But that is the way things are. "No trophy easily obtained is worth having." Just my two grains worth. HH Jim

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Bill, I tend to agree with you regarding not-needing a geological background to be successful in finding gold, But I also agree full-heartedly with all the other points that Chris brought out,... I think that he is Dead-on in that respect. Being Successful in this gold-chasing-hobby in not determined, nor should it be measured by the newest technological medal detector one has. Considering that humans do not have bionic-capabilities (eyes) to find gold, a detector is just a tool that accomplishes this task for them. But it is not the detector that makes the "Man", nor the success of that man. Success in this challenging pursuit comes as a result of our abilities ("If" we use them) to utilize not only our brain with research, but to also rationalize differing-situations that would affect the positioning and placement of gold. By standing in the middle of a wash for example, and placing yourself in the position of a nugget, ...where might you land or come to rest given the environment and conditions of that stretch of wash? Are there boulders or roots to consider? Is there a band of bedrock on both sides of the wash, but nothing showing in the wash (curious,... maybe that bedrock also-extends across the wash, but is covered by overburden). Does the grade of the wash trend downward on one side more than the other, which would force heaver objects in that direction? Is the bedrock scoured and exposed on one side of the wash with a large rock and boulder berm more in the center of the wash ( curious, maybe the main wash (at one time) flowed down the center where that berm is, left that berm, and then at a later rain-torrent-event that berm forced the water to change direction and scour the bedrock on the bank. But where would the gold be held???.. It's most likely under that berm. And what if there is exposed bedrock upstream, but nothing but sand and rock showing in the wash for a long stretch below it,... might there also be bedrock covered by overberdon with gold hiding there??? These are but a few rational considerations that anyone who desires to be a successful detectorist "should-consider", and they have absolutely nothing to do with how technologically advanced medal detector one has.

Agreed and I was talking about learning to do research as the key not the type of equipment owns if you read my posts ... Equipment is only secondary and used to recover the gold you must find first before using ones detector and research is the key to finding that gold on a regular basis. After a producing location is found is when what type of equipment comes into play and then it can indeed make a big difference as to how efficiently the gold is recovered from that area and I am speaking from experience not as a dealer trying to sell something. For me it is about finding gold and the equipment is up to me as to what I use and I simply share my experiences using new equipment when I do and am not bashing anyone or their detector. To be honest I really do not care what another chooses to hunt with and use what I think is best for me and the type of ground I work on a regular basis.

I am simply trying to help others with my posts to have the same success I have had and still have on most every trip out.....

That is why this site is here and was for 5 years before I ever sold a detector to me it is about helping others find gold nuggets.

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This thread began by talking about a hobby. Bill and many others of you who have commented here have taken this beyond a hobby. You have done your homework, done your research and put in your time to make this a prospecting business. 'Hobby miners' are not protected by the 1872 mining laws. Small miners are.

I doubt that Bill ever thought of nugget hunting as a hobby for very long. From the beginning he thought of himself as a prospector and/or small miner with all of the rewards and pitfalls involved. He and his friends got that old Gold Bug equipment working to its max until it would not find any more nuggets in a patch. THEY would move on to another area. His friends are some of the most respected experts in the nugget hunting business. They share 'secrets' with each other on a professional level that the rest of us don't know. The metal detecting companies seek him and his friends out when they are designing new equipment. (Get a few friends like this!)

It takes many years of training and experience to become a professional and/or a doctor. When you are in a group of prospectors you know who the respected professionals are. They are the ones sharing their love for their 'hobby' with others who will never 'get it' at the professional level. They are the ones giving the seminars at the gold shows. They are the ones showing a newbie how to use a detector and how to ground balance it properly. And yes, they also tell prospectors like me where the gold is sometimes.

Bill did all of this at his most recent outing at LSD. Bill is a professional ... a nugget doctor. He didn't charge anyone to sit around the campfire and hear him talk about the areas where you find nugget patches. The other miners there also gladly shared their finds and stories and friendship with a city dwelling, California resident like me. Most of them took someone with them to their patches to hunt the next day. This does not have to be a loner profession.

Two of the most successful miners that I know and follow here on the forums are Adam and Boulder Dash. I suggest that anyone who wants to hunt in central Arizona and find gold show up to Bill's next outing in November and meet these two guys and the others who come. They will teach you more in a short period of time by listening to them than many, many months of solitary nugget hunting.

If you can't make it to one of Bill's outings then join a local club or a club that has claims where you want to prospect. There are many, many people in this business who are waiting for a new miner/prospector to come along that they can tutor but you have to do your part also. You have to keep some of THEIR secrets and become their friend and help others too.

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