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It has been a while since I found any "new" opal wood patches. For the past month or so I have just been bumping my old spots and picking up the smaller scraps I've missed on the first go round. For some reason some of my most successful searches seem to come on the days when I just kind of spur of the moment decide I am gonna run out and check out a new spot. Last night I suddenly, and randomly decided to take my dog for a run in the desert, there was about an hour or two of sunlight left. I parked in our usual spot and headed up a canyon we had not been in yet. I started seeing some signs that I was in a potentially good spot for wood opal. For me the biggest clue is sandstone ledges eroding out of a hill. I had found a couple big (bowling ball sized) chunks of regular petrified wood so I was feeling pretty optimistic. Just as it was getting dark I found my first few pieces of opal wood. I came back today on my trail bike and really scoured that canyon. I found quite a bit of pieces of this stuff. Once again this patch is completely unique from the other patches I've found, it has its own distinct patterns and colors. Most of this stuff was either a light green color, and others had a variety of colors, dark purple, clear, blue, pink and red are most prominent. Oh yea, after about 9 months of frustration I have finally got my Honda trail 90 running good. It is great to be able to ride it finally.

post-26514-0-99314900-1429317639_thumb.jpost-26514-0-38439500-1429317764_thumb.jpost-26514-0-88462700-1429317884_thumb.jpost-26514-0-63295500-1429317985_thumb.jpost-26514-0-73359000-1429318129_thumb.j

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Decided to add a pic of my faithful companion, Lilah. She gets credit for the finds too. Most of the time when I take her for a walk, it is her trotting around from bush to bush and me trying to keep up. Whenever she gets tired and lays down I get to take a few minutes and check for pet wood before she takes off again. post-26514-0-14209300-1429319152_thumb.j

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You are finding some interesting material Chris.

Nice looking puppy. Was she raised on a diet of fluffy muppets? Looks yummy. :brows:

Heavy Pans

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Listen to them preminitions more as you sure are killing it nicely. Mighty fine job on that old honda and smart move with a partner. Thanx much for great post-John

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Coodoes for the Dog and the BIke. Your just in for the ride. LOL! I had a 70 just like that back when. Everyone said it was a Sissies bike. LOL I paid $50.00 for it. Played with it for two year and sold it for $100.00..... Go Figure. Light! Honda will run for just about ever if you change the oil once in a while. Put some Money Tires on them and they can go about any place.

Edited by homefire
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lol, clay, yea her toys don't last long. I keep all their dismembered parts though, they make up her lair. In nature she would have a cave full of old bones and dead animals. Here at home she has a nice pile of blankets and a bunch of shredded stuffed animals to bed down on. Thanks for the comments and for checking out the post guys.

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Homie, yea the Honda is sweet. I would like to have a different bike someday but this one is perfect for me and what I'm trying to do. I love the auto clutch on it. It is a pain, for me, to mess with a normal clutch while trying to suddenly shift going slow up a steep trail hill. Get some weird looks while riding it, some people think it's awesome and some people aren't too sure about it.

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Homie, yea the Honda is sweet. I would like to have a different bike someday but this one is perfect for me and what I'm trying to do. I love the auto clutch on it. It is a pain, for me, to mess with a normal clutch while trying to suddenly shift going slow up a steep trail hill. Get some weird looks while riding it, some people think it's awesome and some people aren't too sure about it.

Chris, it doesn't matter what others think, it's all about what works for you!!

I remember in my younger days I rode a Vespa Ciao Moped, not many people had ever seen one and I got weird looks all the time, on one of my first jobs I worked at a import auto garage about 20 miles from where I lived, I was going home from work the day before Thanksgiving and our boss gave everyone a frozen turkey which I had strapped to the little "luggage rack" behind the seat, I was stopped at a red light and a cop pulled up beside me and rolled down his window and asked..."What is that?", I knew he was asking about the Moped, but I looked behind me and said..."It's a frozen turkey, I thought everyone knew what a turkey looked like!!!"... he let out big laugh and said..." I'm talking about that thing you're riding!", so I told him what it was and he wanted to check it out so I pulled over and gave him the guided tour of a Moped, even let him ride it around the parking lot, he liked it a lot and said he may get his kids one!!!

Here's a couple of photos that are very similar to the one I had, mine was a few years older than these but looked much the same.

whiteciao_copy.jpg

vespa_ciao_1976.jpg

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Boonie bikes are akin to marriage-may not be perfect but love the one your with :4chsmu1: as the next one may not be as nice,or the next or.... :old: John

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Hey Skip, that is a sweet little bike. It looks similar to mine. Did they run off of gas? I see it has actual pedals, how did that sucker work? I live in a small town with two stoplights, I love these old bikes and scooters for getting around in town and saving on gas. I can't wait to get another ct90, and one of those type of scooters like you had would be cool too. I don't really like the look of typical mopeds, that's just me, the ciao is a cool design though. I would ride one of those. Lol, mines got the luggage rack too, it's a little bigger than the one in your pics, I could probably take two turkeys if I had too. I like to strap a milk crate to the rack and use that when I am hunting for petrified wood, it's better than carrying a backpack of rocks anyway.

John, I am still getting to know this bike, I named her ol' Betsy. It is easy for me to take off and get out in the middle of nowhere really quick. Whenever I get way out and turn the ignition off, I think about how much faith I am putting in a 40 year old bike. Every time it starts back up I say a silent little prayer of thanks, and give ol' Betsy a few reassuring pats to show my appreciation. Last week I went riding up one of the small mountains just outside of town. I got way out there, to where the foothills ended and the mountain started sloping up real steep. The old road I was on just sort of faded out and dissapeared so I slowed down to stop. Soon as I am about to stop the bike starts coughing and sputtering trying to die on me. I checked the gas tank and it was getting really low. The bike has a reserve line so it's hard to run out, and I have the "auxiliary tank". It's a little gas tank that looks like a metal canteen, it is only on some ct90s. I filled up from the extra tank and took off, I made it about halfway home and the bike starts slowing way down and barely chugging along. I hopped off and walked/idled the bike up the hill it was on and stopped at the top to have a look. The air filter had flopped loose on one end. I put it back, tightened the clamp, and ol' Betsy ran like a champ all the way home.

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Chris, the Ciao ran on regular gasoline, to start it you put it up on it's kickstand, turn the ignition on, pull the compression release lever and start pedaling, once you get the rear wheel turning a good bit release the compression release and it started right up, from there just twist the throttle and away you go, you could also start it without putting it up on the kickstand but you had to get your speed up before releasing the compression release lever which takes longer to do, the best thing is if you ran out of gas you could hold the compression release and just pedal it as you would a regular bicycle although not as efficient as a regular bike because it wasn't geared to pedal for propulsion and you would be also turning the engine as well just with no compression, which will give you a good workout but better than pushing it unless you came to a decent incline/hill and then it was better to push it up the hill and ride it down when you got to the top, that being said you had to really work hard or not have a dollar or less, or just be stupid to run out of gas as the little tank (I think it was about 3/4 to 1 gallon) would take you up to 150 miles or so if memory serves, but as I get older the CRS is kicking in more often so I could be wrong on how far a tank would take you but I know it was a good many miles, the only drawback to the Ciao was the top speed was only around 30 to 40 MPH but average speed top speed was about 35 MPH, if you didn't go up hill and then it dropped dramatically and it's definitely a "city" type ride, not much for offroad, even though as a youngster of 16 I would "jump" some small dirt mounds and I using the word jump generously, the Ciao didn't have any suspension at all so it a good thing it wouldn't get too airborne or the landing would be rough and also help loosen up parts of the bike/moped sooner than one would like!!

Mine was more like the last photo as the first photo I think maybe a European version and had drum brakes on the front, mine had "clamp the wheel" type front brakes as in the last photo and drum in the rear.

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  • 2 months later...

They sound like cool little bikes. They must be pretty rare too, I haven't seen any for sale in this area. I had my bike parked in the desert out here while I was digging a few weeks ago. It was parked in a friends camp and chained to his trailer. He was also away from camp. Someone came and went in his trailer, stole his gold and money and trashed a bunch of his stuff. I guess they thought the bike was his too because they took my spark plug out and poured sand in the engine. He had been camping and mining in that area for a year and a half straight, he has literally been living in the desert. Someone took all the gold he dug in that time. He had been digging out there off and on for decades and he said he never had any problems there. I was getting real good gold but I had to clear out after all that drama. Don't know when it will be safe with people like that sneaking around.

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Chris,

Sorry to hear about your friend's problems and your bike being a victim as well, hope they catch the lowlife that did it!!

Were you able to pull the engine apart and clean it out and get it running again?

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I took it apart and vacuumed about a quarter cup of sand out, that was sitting right on top of the piston. After putting it back together I was able to get it started again. I don't know how to adjust the carb properly so it starts and idles but is unridable, pretty much dies every time I give it gas. There's only two dials on the carb and I adjust them until the engine sounds good but it is never the right setting. The last real mechanic who had my bike adjusted the carb to where it idled a lot higher than I would have it. But the bike ran great after he adjusted it. He moved unfortunately, there are no bike shops/mechanics near me. Just got it back from another guy who claimed they could fix it. I even started it for him before he took it to show him it was running and just needed adjusting. I ended up walking the bike home from his place and it won't even start now. Don't know what the hell he did to it but sure didn't fix it. It's been a frustrating adventure with this bike. In August I will have had it for one year. It wasn't untill about two months ago I found someone to get it running well enough to ride reliably. I tested it around town untill I was sure it was running good then hauled it out to near where I was getting gold so I didn't have to carry all my gear in and out on foot everyday. The first day it was out there someone sabotaged it.

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Chris,

If I was nearby I could help you out, but now-a-days the internet is your friend when it comes to DIY when you don't know much on the subject of interest, is it a 90(?) if so here's a link to a search results for "adjusting the carburetor on a honda 90".

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=adjusting+the+carburetor+on+a+honda+90

Do a search for any other issues you're having with the bike and you should be able to get it running correctly and keep it running.for a long time to come.

I've been doing mechanic work of some sort all my life and even the best mechanics have to go to reference material e.g.shop manuals for specs and proper procedure many times especially when working on models that they haven't worked on many times before and even then many times specs and procedure can sometimes change on the same model but of a different year, a mechanic that never double checks specs and proper procedure from time to time is not a very professional mechanic, and now-a-days those specs and procedures are but a simple computer click away!

This link seems to have the specs you need for tuning your bike, do a search for the proper procedure for any steps you don't know how to do.

http://www.justanswer.com/motorcycle/2lwdk-ct-90-thte-carb-two-screws-startwit.html#re.v/184/

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I would also recommend that you get a shop manual for your bike so you can do all the work yourself and thus not have to depend on others to work on your bike, you will get a great sense of accomplishment and security if you can keep it running top notch yourself or do the repairs when it may break down on you out in the field.

A manual for your bike should be available in a PDF file for free/

Maybe this manual is for your model?

http://www.vintagehonda.net/docs/ct90-110sm.pdf

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:th::evil1::grr01::old::nutty: SUMMABs sad to hear such garbage going on as mining is tough enough but this &^%$#@ is time to lock and load...sorry for your loss...John

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Hey skip, thanks for those links and the advice. I am going to try and fix it myself this time. I think the last guy I took it to killed my battery somehow. The bike started fine before he took it and when I go to get it he says my battery is dead, that it had no water in it (bs) and he filled it up and it wouldn't charge. The battery is way overfilled now, and I can see a bunch of dried white crap where it overflowed probably from him trying to charge it after putting too much water in. So I need to get a new battery then I'll start from scratch. I'm going to order a clymers or Haynes manual for this bike. I've heard those are easier to read and follow. That one link that describes how to set the air fuel mixture and do points and gaps looks very helpful. I see a lot of manuals that say to set the idle to a certain rpms. How do you measure rpms when adjusting the idle screw?

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....... How do you measure rpms when adjusting the idle screw?

Unfortunately on vehicles without a tachometer you will need a handheld tachometer, now-a-days they have digital/laser tachometers that can check the RPMs on rotating parts of the engine, e.g. crankshaft pulley etc., you just need to make sure you check a part of the engine that's turning the same RPMs as the crankshaft and not the other pulleys. etc. that are driving by belts and gears that aren't connect directly to the crankshaft.

That being said the best digital tachometer aren't cheap and cost around $100 and up to many 100s of dollars, but there are much cheaper ones being sold but I can't attest to the quality of these tachometers but they may work for your needs of the occasional tuning of your bike. otherwise you can just try to set the RPMs by ear until you can possibly stop at a local garage that has a good digital tachometer to set it more accurately.

If you want to get one of the cheaper ones and try it, here are a few link to some of the cheaper ones.

http://www.amazon.com/Handheld-Digital-Laser-Tachometer-Engine/dp/B009T4REQG

http://www.harborfreight.com/digital-photo-sensor-tachometer-66632.html

They also make handheld tachometers that have a small shalf sticking out the end of them and you just push the shaft onto the end of the crankshaft to check the RPMs, but these also cost similarly to the laser tachometers but if you do a little searching you can find cheaper ones.

Just a word of warning if you don't get the shaft of the tach perfectly centered on the shaft of the mechanism you're checking, I'll just jet you imagine the possible outcome, e.g. hand and or tach goes into turning shaft, pulleys, belts, etc., tach gets ripped out of your hand and goes flying, etc., etc. :2mo5pow::grr01:

http://www.amazon.com/Extech-461750-PocketTach-Mini-Tachometer/dp/B00023RXBO

You can also buy mini-tachs at a very reasonable cost that work by connecting wire/s to your ignition and stay connected/mounted on your bike/engine, most register RPMs and engine running hours, I have one similar to the one at the following link on my dredge engine, but mine costs a bit more because it's a name brand. but if you get a digital handheld it can be used for any engine or other rotating mechanisms you need to check RPMs on..

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00ACDP6YU/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_3?pf_rd_p=1944687742&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B009T4REQG&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0FKKYEXDB1G5DSS74ANB

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