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Chris Coffee

Using the 5000 and the Sadie coil in water

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Hello all,

I have the NF Sadie coil and am looking to go to a nearby river to do some detecting. I know they say the coil is "water resistant", but I am wondering about the possibilty of water getting into the lower shaft. I know this would normally not be an issue because the coil is at the ground so the water would settle above the coil in the shaft. But I am worried about if I have to pick the coil up above my head for any reason (to get around a bush or tree, etc.) that the water could run down the shaft and somehow find its way into the control box. Is this a real possibility? If it is, what is the best way to prevent it? Thanks.

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I don't own a Minelab PI, but I do own several other detectors that aren't waterproof but the coils are and I do use them in the water, so I would say Yes it is a real possibility of water running up the shaft and getting the control wet if not worst and inside the control box, the best precaution I can suggest which is what I do is to not the raise the coil higher than the control box and make sure you transport and store the detector in a position where the control box is higher than the coil until any water that maybe in the shaft has drained and evaporated completely.

The above advice is what I have always given for many years to anyone using a non- waterproof detector that has a waterproof coil in and around water.

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Have you ever retrieved a target from under water? Get ready for the worst experience of your life :tisk-tisk:

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After completing your day separate the lower shaft from the upper at the knuckle nut and turn the lower shaft upside down to drain any water that may be in there. Also with the coil where the coil wire comes out of the coil run a bead of silicon caulk around the junction just to be sure there isn't a good path for water to get into the coil. Remember the coil is only water resistant not water proof per the mfgr. By sealing that spot on the coil it should help to prevent water infiltration. When you are done be sure to leave the coil out in the sun to dry out any that may have gotten in. Best of luck ... hope you don't screw up a good coil.

Mike F

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if you have a coil cover you'll need to make sure all the water is out of it as well.

Edited by MonsterGuppy
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Have you ever retrieved a target from under water? Get ready for the worst experience of your life :tisk-tisk:

Actually, I haven't, Adam. But with your "expression" I would certainly like to hear your experience. :)

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Thank you all. I will do as Mike suggested and silicon the joint where the cable goes in, and then let it dry after draining the water out.

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Adam is right, it's miserable. I'd rather paint a house.

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I hate painting but I do like finding nuggets. I have found many many nuggets in less than two feet of water. The problem you are asking about I have never given much thought to. In my experience there is no problem as your control box is some what water tight. The challenge is figuring what to do with your detector while you get out your goggles and tools. Hopefully the water is not murky. I have worked on a target for over an hour to find a piece of trash. Good luck

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Water retrieval is fun for sure. If you don't have a underwater unit it is the opposite. Face mask or 12' x 12' floating plexiglass box or 4" round viewer with plexiglass end is your best bet. Harbor Freight carries those 12"-18" long tweezers and they sure make finding your gold much easier. A simple hand run sucker tube is yet another great ez to do project. John PS-always seal your coil cover on with a bead of GE door/window silicone to keep out water and dirt that causes falsing and reduces depth penetration. Cheap,UV protected,ez to peel off when you wear out the coil cover and need replacement...

Edited by Hoser John

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I have worked on a target for over an hour to find a piece of trash.

Exactly my point.... :grr01:

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Chris ... The 'Boys from down South' are exactly right about the recovery ... the hole is constantly filling in as the material wants to stay at the same level especially if you are playing in the mud more than gravel. Water much deeper than a foot deep is going to cause you fits if you can't put your detector down where it can remain dry. DO NOT PUT THE CONTROL BOX IN THE WATER as it is not sealed and is not even considered water resistant other than to light rain! And even then it is strongly recommended that you cover it with a plastic bag if you need to be in the rain very long.

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All suggestions above are necessary when hunting in water with a non water proof detector.

All coils have silicone at the point where the cable goes into the coil. If you put more just be sure not to break the original seal.

Water resistance means mostly wet from grass or a quick hose down. Most of the plastic that coils are made from have pores just like your skin does. If held under water for a long period of time water will seep into the interior of the coil.

Two different companies/coils have taught me two bad lessons on this subject.

That's why now when ever possible I buy only WATER PROOF coils. Also much stronger and has better stability.

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All this water talk.... Where is there any water in AZ????? Never seen any myself...

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1. Drill a drain hole in the lower shaft.

2. Get a Platypus.

Or just get the SDC......

Edited by nvchris

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Detecting and target retrieval underwater is a non issue with the little coil, as you have extreme accuracy pinpointing. Use a facemask or viewing tube and common sniping tools. You are now an electronic sniper targeting higher percentage payoff cracks and crevices in the creek. Many motherload creeks are fairly free of trash and can be a lot of fun to detect underwater in the hot summer. Dont let them arizona boyz get you down.

I would also silicon the coil carefully at all seams, and around the cable, as I have had water incursion on the 8x6 coil in the past. Otherwise it is an amazing sniping coil.

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Wes is right motherlode creeks are really run to snipe during the summer.

Maybe he has been luckier than most at being able to pick out the bits he has found,

but it can be pretty challenging depending on the type of bottom and the kind of material over it.

Maybe my addendum to NV Chris' list would be:

1. leave detector on the edge of the creek nice and dry.

2. fire up the newly legal dredge

3. hose up material

4 check sluice box

in any case, good luck and have fun.

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