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Do I have to spend $6000 to find a dang nugget?


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Yep, been there done that a few times....Then I started dragging bushes and branches behind me and that helped some.... Of course the old saying "Silence is golden!" is certainly true! ... Cheers, Unc

 

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Might as well add my two cents. Unlike most, On my third trip out I found gold and I have been finding gold ever since.  My secret?  I had one hell of a teacher.  It made all the difference in the

So far I'm at around $3500.00+/- for the sub grammers I've found. That's probably a little short actually since I haven't added up airfare on paper (don't want to!). I'm spoiled though and I know it.

So yeah....   Two and a half years later, it doesn't cost $6000 to find a dang nugget.  But when you add it all up, it can and will cost in excess of 6k for most people who are serious about finding g

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On 12/24/2016 at 3:08 AM, DOC said:

Might as well add my two cents.

Unlike most, On my third trip out I found gold and I have been finding gold ever since.  My secret?  I had one hell of a teacher.  It made all the difference in the world.  Before I ever laid a coil on the ground, for two days, Hoss Blackman took me to all of the places where he had found gold, and patches.  He explained why he thought the gold was there and how he thought it got there.  All of these were worked out areas that he had beat to death.  No active patches.

I started to see patterns in the way gold got tucked behind rocks in a small gully, or caught behind a bush lining a gully, or sitting on a bench right before it got to the gully.  At the time it was driving me crazy.  He was showing me where he had found gold, but he wasn't letting me swing a coil.  I had no idea of how valuable those lessons were.  I was thinking, what the hell use it this?  The gold is already gone.  Are you just rubbing it in my face.  "THIS IS WHERE I FOUND GOLD, AND IT'S ALL GONE NOW, so NEENER NEENER NEENER!"  I didn't realize that he was using the wax on wax off Mr. Miyagi method of teaching.

When all is said and done, all we are doing is processing dirt.  The more dirt you process, the greater the chances that you will find gold.  The more dirt you process from spots that match the characteristics of ground where gold has been found before, the more efficient you become at processing, not just dirt, but dirt with high potential.

Look at big placer operations like you see on Gold Rush.  What are they doing?  They are processing dirt, and a heck of a lot of it.  But do they process ALL THE DIRT?  Nope, they wait until they get close to bedrock, down to those gravel pay layers.  Well as detectorists, we are doing the same thing but on a much much much smaller scale.  Accordingly, we have to be very good at spotting areas that are more likely to have gold, than just swinging our coils any place.  There are only so many hours in a day, and our goal is to process the most promising ground carefully while moving more quickly over ground that does not appear to have much potential.

We have all heard go low and slow.  Well I agree to a certain extent.  Stay low, but alter your speed.  You want to move along at a reasonable pace when you are trying to find that first nugget.  Once you find it, then, slow way down.  You will want to even backtrack over the nearby ground that you moved a little faster over.

So, it sounds like you have been finding all kinds of trash.  That's good.  It tells me you know how to use your detector correctly, and adjust it.  However, it sounds like you just may not have the hang of exactly where to look for gold.

This is my suggestion. Ask some of the old timers if they would show you old places where they have found gold.  Make it clear that you are talking about places that they have completely worked out, and that have no potential left to find anything.  You're not asking to be shown active patches.  You just want to see what gold bearing ground looks like.  If you find someone kind enough to accommodate you.  When you get there, start asking questions.  "What prompted you to look here?"  "When you found the first nugget what was unusual or usual about where you found it?" "Did you theorize where the source may have been?"  "What were clues that the source may have been there?"  "What similarities does this location have in common with other places where you have found gold?"  Look around!  What do you see?  Red dirt?  Quartz?  Contact zones?  Any indication of old timer activity?  Benches?  Size of the quartz?  Color of the quartz? etc. etc.

As soon as I started to learn the commonalities among gold bearing areas, I started looking for areas that matched those characteristics.  I looked for those areas in places where people have never bothered to even swing a coil.  Guess what happened?  I started finding flat out virgin patches.  Not a speck of trash, just nuggets.  Do you know what it is like to swing your coil and every time you get a target you know it's gold before you dig it?  You just don't know how big the nugget is or how deep until you dig it.  Do you know what it feels like to make one swing of your coil and have three targets in one swing, and all of them turn out to be nuggets?  Do you know the feeling when your heart feels like it is going to jump out of your chest, and you actually have to sit down for a minute, have a drink of water, and have a little talk with yourself? 

"OK, settle down, it's obviously a virgin patch of gold.  Relax.  Take some deep breaths.  I know you're excited but this is going to be fun.  Just take your time, enjoy the experience, this patch isn't going to run away.  You are off the beaten path so no one is going to happen on you.  Do this methodically.  Take a note of the depths, and the size of the nuggets.  Look at where they are positioned in relation to the other nuggets.  See if you can discern a pattern and where the source might be.  You OK now?  Great, now let's have some fun."

Knowledge is the key, to the luck it takes, to find gold.  I always teach my students, if you don't spend at least 20 minutes talking to every nugget you find, you are throwing away valuable knowledge.   "Where did you come from?  Why did you decide to stop here?  You sure are rounded did you travel a long way?  If I were you, where would I have come from?  You got any big brothers or sisters around here?  Why do like this ground?  Is it the color of the dirt?  How come you didn't get deeper in the ground?  How come you were so deep in the ground?  Why were you so shallow?

There's an old saying, "If you want good answers, ask good questions!"  It will all start to click if you start actually seeing ground where gold has been found.

I'm a scuba diver.  One of my favorite ocean delicacies are rock scallops.  Imagine the sweetest lobster in the world.  That's what rock scallops taste like.  They are not the scallops you get in the store.  When I first wanted to find rock scallops I would dive in the ocean and everyone would come back with scallops but me.  I mean they told me that they looked like clams but they embed themselves in the coral, and they are pretty well camouflaged so you have to look close.  After my second dive of coming up empty handed, the captain says,  "Where's your scallops?"  I said, "I didn't see any.  I've never done this before."  He said, "Dude they are all over the place right under the boat 20 feet down.  Come on let's go back in real quick I'll show you."  We get to the bottom, right in front of me on this great big rock outcrop covered with coral he points a scallop out.  Pops it off the rock, and motioned for me to put it in my bag.  Then he grabs me and pulls me back away from the rock outcrop and motions for me to look at the rock wall.  My good god there were hundreds of them.  I had been looking right at them and not seeing them.  It took someone with knowledge to show me what to look for.  In the next 10 minutes I had my limit of 20.

So find someone to show you what to look for.  I'm going to bet it will make all the difference in the world.  Oh yeah, the first nugget I found, third time out was a 1/4 ounce.  I found it with a Minelab XT18000 VLF machine with an 11 DD coil.  It was in an area that looked similar to all the other areas that Hoss had shown me where he had found gold.

Thanks Doc for sharing and taking the time to write it. a lot of good info in there.
AzNuggetBob

 

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I'm also a newbie at detecting...despite the fact my GMT as been in the closet since '98 when I got it from the folks at Pro Mack in AJ. Looking forward to being out with a group.  I've been a desert rat since moving to Rancho Mirage in August of 1961.  That year the surrounding mountains had snow, the winter was chilly, and it was the last year of no smog from Banning-Berdo.  Only 1 school year there and ended up in Las Vegas in August 1962. Our Boy Scout troop was obsessed with desert survival... loved it.  Joined the Corps and... drum roll here... given an Air Wing MOS to train twice at The Stumps in 1967!  I was, literally, between my home and prior home.  It snowed in the High Desert that Thanksgiving. Blew off the boozers at the E-club and beaches to hang out (with permission) on weekends with the original authentic Old Timey dry washer crowd mostly in their late 60's to 70's.  They had primitive versions of detectors but I was shown a trick the wives cooked up.  They followed, flagged/rock-piled black sand deposits, and created a polygon bordered with corners to mark a "patch" to sample or dry washing.  They mainly dry sampled with loupes but if ANY rough chunks, no matter how small, were visible, they would detect walking every inch filling in the patch like cross-hatching in Art class to shade.  Then they would search for their favorite bedrock strata for their puffers.  I fell in love with those puffers.  Fairly quiet and relaxing.  Gas motor noises in the desert make me feel like running my Mosin sight ladder out to #8.

I called Mr. Southern recently and, since I'm a paid-up LDMA Lifer thanks to Boo-Coo's (RIP) jujitsu wristlock getting me to join up at Italian Bar, he invited me to Stanton for the Dec. 28 Detectorists' Seminar also with Mr. Hoagland.  I'll get my German rucky loaded with extra alkalines, scoop, magnetized pick, canteens, ID cards, Mining Guide, Silva compass, Topo, Koss TD81's (free upgrade), White's Pinpointer, raffle-won test nugget glued between 2 red poker chips, and fire up "Greta" like I was showed at Pro-Mack.  Maybe it's too much but I'm nervous about not having the right gear.  Guess I could bring a small vial and tweezers in case Kwan Yin and Athena smile down on me.

Sorry for the run-on chat-up.  Guess it's natural being from urban Chicago where everyone in my neighborhood sounded like Studs Terkel... in Polski, Ruskyi, Yiddishe, any Scandiwegian, Irish, Italian, Sici's, German, various Caribbean Spanish, Armenian, and Cantonese dialects.

Hope to meet-n-greet some of you at the Stanton event this Wednesday.

Edited by Phil-n-Peoria
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On 12/24/2016 at 3:08 AM, DOC said:

Might as well add my two cents.

Unlike most, On my third trip out I found gold and I have been finding gold ever since.  My secret?  I had one hell of a teacher.  It made all the difference in the world.  Before I ever laid a coil on the ground, for two days, Hoss Blackman took me to all of the places where he had found gold, and patches.  He explained why he thought the gold was there and how he thought it got there.  All of these were worked out areas that he had beat to death.  No active patches.

I started to see patterns in the way gold got tucked behind rocks in a small gully, or caught behind a bush lining a gully, or sitting on a bench right before it got to the gully.  At the time it was driving me crazy.  He was showing me where he had found gold, but he wasn't letting me swing a coil.  I had no idea of how valuable those lessons were.  I was thinking, what the hell use it this?  The gold is already gone.  Are you just rubbing it in my face.  "THIS IS WHERE I FOUND GOLD, AND IT'S ALL GONE NOW, so NEENER NEENER NEENER!"  I didn't realize that he was using the wax on wax off Mr. Miyagi method of teaching.

When all is said and done, all we are doing is processing dirt.  The more dirt you process, the greater the chances that you will find gold.  The more dirt you process from spots that match the characteristics of ground where gold has been found before, the more efficient you become at processing, not just dirt, but dirt with high potential.

Look at big placer operations like you see on Gold Rush.  What are they doing?  They are processing dirt, and a heck of a lot of it.  But do they process ALL THE DIRT?  Nope, they wait until they get close to bedrock, down to those gravel pay layers.  Well as detectorists, we are doing the same thing but on a much much much smaller scale.  Accordingly, we have to be very good at spotting areas that are more likely to have gold, than just swinging our coils any place.  There are only so many hours in a day, and our goal is to process the most promising ground carefully while moving more quickly over ground that does not appear to have much potential.

We have all heard go low and slow.  Well I agree to a certain extent.  Stay low, but alter your speed.  You want to move along at a reasonable pace when you are trying to find that first nugget.  Once you find it, then, slow way down.  You will want to even backtrack over the nearby ground that you moved a little faster over.

So, it sounds like you have been finding all kinds of trash.  That's good.  It tells me you know how to use your detector correctly, and adjust it.  However, it sounds like you just may not have the hang of exactly where to look for gold.

This is my suggestion. Ask some of the old timers if they would show you old places where they have found gold.  Make it clear that you are talking about places that they have completely worked out, and that have no potential left to find anything.  You're not asking to be shown active patches.  You just want to see what gold bearing ground looks like.  If you find someone kind enough to accommodate you.  When you get there, start asking questions.  "What prompted you to look here?"  "When you found the first nugget what was unusual or usual about where you found it?" "Did you theorize where the source may have been?"  "What were clues that the source may have been there?"  "What similarities does this location have in common with other places where you have found gold?"  Look around!  What do you see?  Red dirt?  Quartz?  Contact zones?  Any indication of old timer activity?  Benches?  Size of the quartz?  Color of the quartz? etc. etc.

As soon as I started to learn the commonalities among gold bearing areas, I started looking for areas that matched those characteristics.  I looked for those areas in places where people have never bothered to even swing a coil.  Guess what happened?  I started finding flat out virgin patches.  Not a speck of trash, just nuggets.  Do you know what it is like to swing your coil and every time you get a target you know it's gold before you dig it?  You just don't know how big the nugget is or how deep until you dig it.  Do you know what it feels like to make one swing of your coil and have three targets in one swing, and all of them turn out to be nuggets?  Do you know the feeling when your heart feels like it is going to jump out of your chest, and you actually have to sit down for a minute, have a drink of water, and have a little talk with yourself? 

"OK, settle down, it's obviously a virgin patch of gold.  Relax.  Take some deep breaths.  I know you're excited but this is going to be fun.  Just take your time, enjoy the experience, this patch isn't going to run away.  You are off the beaten path so no one is going to happen on you.  Do this methodically.  Take a note of the depths, and the size of the nuggets.  Look at where they are positioned in relation to the other nuggets.  See if you can discern a pattern and where the source might be.  You OK now?  Great, now let's have some fun."

Knowledge is the key, to the luck it takes, to find gold.  I always teach my students, if you don't spend at least 20 minutes talking to every nugget you find, you are throwing away valuable knowledge.   "Where did you come from?  Why did you decide to stop here?  You sure are rounded did you travel a long way?  If I were you, where would I have come from?  You got any big brothers or sisters around here?  Why do like this ground?  Is it the color of the dirt?  How come you didn't get deeper in the ground?  How come you were so deep in the ground?  Why were you so shallow?

There's an old saying, "If you want good answers, ask good questions!"  It will all start to click if you start actually seeing ground where gold has been found.

I'm a scuba diver.  One of my favorite ocean delicacies are rock scallops.  Imagine the sweetest lobster in the world.  That's what rock scallops taste like.  They are not the scallops you get in the store.  When I first wanted to find rock scallops I would dive in the ocean and everyone would come back with scallops but me.  I mean they told me that they looked like clams but they embed themselves in the coral, and they are pretty well camouflaged so you have to look close.  After my second dive of coming up empty handed, the captain says,  "Where's your scallops?"  I said, "I didn't see any.  I've never done this before."  He said, "Dude they are all over the place right under the boat 20 feet down.  Come on let's go back in real quick I'll show you."  We get to the bottom, right in front of me on this great big rock outcrop covered with coral he points a scallop out.  Pops it off the rock, and motioned for me to put it in my bag.  Then he grabs me and pulls me back away from the rock outcrop and motions for me to look at the rock wall.  My good god there were hundreds of them.  I had been looking right at them and not seeing them.  It took someone with knowledge to show me what to look for.  In the next 10 minutes I had my limit of 20.

So find someone to show you what to look for.  I'm going to bet it will make all the difference in the world.  Oh yeah, the first nugget I found, third time out was a 1/4 ounce.  I found it with a Minelab XT18000 VLF machine with an 11 DD coil.  It was in an area that looked similar to all the other areas that Hoss had shown me where he had found gold.

Doc I liked your post so much I decided to bump it again.
When I first started reading your post I thought you were reading my new book. (spooky)(still writing but not published) I have never met Hoss but I've seen him at the gold shows years ago.
It seems we were using the same M.O.to find gold and I have to say it has worked for me.
The more I learned about reading the character of the gold found and geology,alluvial flows and sedimentation the more it helped me visually analyze a given area and find more gold.
When I go to a new area after a lot of research I re-assess it again onsite.If you look at geologic/mineral maps of the area it can help a lot too.
That's where the geology comes in. I don't wait for a nugget to pass under my coil, I track them down. :yesss:
AzNuggetBob

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Here's my take on this topic. Unless you get really lucky.... it'll be weeks, months or even years before you find the first one. By then, you'll have spent hundreds or maybe even thousands of dollars on food, lodging, gas, etc. Maybe even a few hundred on medical expenses if you get really unlucky. Might also want to include lawyers fees and alimony in a worse case scenario which is what happened with a buddy of mine. In short, for most people it's a losing proposition financially but I'll never give up the hunt. I really enjoy the fresh air, the thrill of the hunt and most of all.. meeting people with similar interests. That's what makes this great recreation. I'll keep doing it until the day I'm dead, no matter what the doctor tells me.

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hear, hear...   Focus more on the journey and every once in a while a little yellow may be there to meet you at the destination.  But you'll be sorely disappointed if you are only doing it for the gold.  Most of the time the gold doesn't even cover gas costs.  But then there are those other times ....

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Knowledge is golden,If your relying on luck all I can say is good luck. AzNuggetBob

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Hey guys, I'm working on the book. I really appreciate your support on it.Still working on the format and trying to edit the files and photo's.trying to decide,print or digital.
will let you know. Fred I did a gold prospecting video back in the 90's. this is my first book but I'm thinking digital?
AzNuggetBob

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11 minutes ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Hey guys, I'm working on the book. I really appreciate your support on it.Still working on the format and trying to edit the files and photo's.trying to decide,print or digital.
will let you know. Fred I did a gold prospecting video back in the 90's. this is my first book but I'm thinking digital?
AzNuggetBob

Bob, is that video still available?   Jim

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Jim  As far as I know its not being produced anymore and hasn't been for several years. you may find one on ebay. they are getting collectable and hard to find.
Its called Gold nugget prospecting
metal detecting with the pros.
AzNuggetBob

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10 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Hey guys, I'm working on the book. I really appreciate your support on it.Still working on the format and trying to edit the files and photo's.trying to decide,print or digital.
will let you know. Fred I did a gold prospecting video back in the 90's. this is my first book but I'm thinking digital?
AzNuggetBob

Bob,

Choosing the correct book format to go with these days can be either a kinda tough call or a no-brainer, depending on a couple factors..

On one hand -- with digital publishing about the only thing you have invested is your time..

On the other -- like Fred was saying there's us old skool folks who want or actually need to hold the item in our hands, which introduces the costs associated with printing into the picture..

Further, if you can't get a publisher to take a chance on your work, then pretty much the only avenue left available is a vanity press.. I was about to say that expense comes up-front and directly out of your pocket -- but these days with the GoFundMe type sites available a lot if not all of those charges can get spread around, partially if not totally off-setting the writer's outlay..

A possible 3rd option might be that outfit republishing / reprinting the long out-of-print mining books, although I would imagine the only probable way for something to happen with them would be if they are the folks doing the actual printing as well.. I know nothing about them though, so this is merely a thought that blipped on for a sec somewhere in what's left of my brain..

Plus, as far as I know there's no law that emperically states you can't do both..

Personally, I'm with Fred.. I am one of those people who needs a hard copy in hand, both for the enjoyment derived and to achieve maxium take-away from the material presented.. Me trying to read more than a few paragraphs off a monitor just ends up giving me a headache.. And while I understand readers like the Kindle and etc have improved tremendously, owning one given my lifestyle makes no sense.. It isn't like I'm a road warrior who needs to pack light but right or anything like that.. I actually remember how to pick up a book, open it and read from within.. :89:

Regardless which route you end up going, I, along with the others, do look forward to reading what you have to say -- especially since you're planning on including purdy pic-a-tures too.. :4chsmu1:

Swamp

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Swamp,Fred.Thanks for your suggestions and opinions on this. I'm thinking the same thing.we dumped a bunch of money into the production of that video, a lot of people involved.
From the graphics on the jacket to distribution, but that was back when the net was young.
a lot of legal B.S. involved in this too. copyright,trademark infringement, plagiarism. etc.

AzNuggetBob

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On ‎12‎/‎29‎/‎2016 at 9:48 AM, Morlock said:

Here's my take on this topic. Unless you get really lucky.... it'll be weeks, months or even years before you find the first one. By then, you'll have spent hundreds or maybe even thousands of dollars on food, lodging, gas, etc. Maybe even a few hundred on medical expenses if you get really unlucky. Might also want to include lawyers fees and alimony in a worse case scenario which is what happened with a buddy of mine. In short, for most people it's a losing proposition financially but I'll never give up the hunt. I really enjoy the fresh air, the thrill of the hunt and most of all.. meeting people with similar interests. That's what makes this great recreation. I'll keep doing it until the day I'm dead, no matter what the doctor tells me.

This seems to be the truth of it!

I have been there myself and was out swinging a vlf in hot soil the first year. I got my first Minelab in November 2015 and fist nugget .58ozt on January 21 2016. I do hunt like a crazy guy out there in freezing rain, wind, sleet. and what ever else can go wrong with weather. This year was so aawesome as I finished my 2016 year with 40.2 ounces and enjoyed all of it!

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1 hour ago, Whitebutler said:

This seems to be the truth of it!

I have been there myself and was out swinging a vlf in hot soil the first year. I got my first Minelab in November 2015 and fist nugget .58ozt on January 21 2016. I do hunt like a crazy guy out there in freezing rain, wind, sleet. and what ever else can go wrong with weather. This year was so aawesome as I finished my 2016 year with 40.2 ounces and enjoyed all of it!

That's awesome do you have any pictures?

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23 minutes ago, fishing8046 said:

That's awesome do you have any pictures?

I do of all of it just won't post them. I have some that I will share a little later I the year. I won't alert those who know me what I have found. It's ruthless around here. 

I also never bring the stuff home. It goes from hunting to where ever I get rid of it or verious safe deposit boxes. 

Things like that are never safe enough!

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  • 8 months later...

Martin,

You are absolutely right.  That's why an ATV is a valuable addition.  And not a RED one!  Be stealthy in your clothing and your gear. 

I love Detector Pro headphones, but one of the dumbest things they ever did was make their NUGGET BUSTER model headphones bright yellow.  Gary, who used to own Detector Pro was primarily a treasure hunter, big into diving.  It never occurred to him that a pair of headphones that were yellow would scream HERE I AM.

Also, I am always prepared from an impromptu overnight camping excursion. Sleeping bag, dried food, plenty of water.  Head lamp, etc.

If I am on a patch, I am not leaving until I am pretty confident I cleaned it out.  I call home, "Honey, I'm on a patch. staying the night."

Doc

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Just read this thread , wow ,  thanks to all for the great info .

Doc that was very informative and I guess that is what I need to do . I can find the junk but never gold.....yet.

I have a  GM1000 and I got a GPX 4500. now to ask questions like you said.

Again Thanks  to all for the info.

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So yeah....   Two and a half years later, it doesn't cost $6000 to find a dang nugget.  But when you add it all up, it can and will cost in excess of 6k for most people who are serious about finding gold with a metal detector.  Besides the detector,  there are lots of other bits and pieces necessary for nugget shooting.  A good reliable truck, preferably 4x4, is a major one.  Lots of time to devote to the quest is probably the most 'expensive' and the one that many people just don't have in abundance.  Sure you can get extremely lucky and pick up a good gold detector for less than $1000 and go out and score right away.  But there's a substantial used detector market for a reason.  Most don't succeed, and it's not because of the detector.

I found my first 5 nuggets with a White's SPP and a couple small coils.  Those five nuggets averaged over 1 gram each, but were few and far between.  The first two nuggets were more or less just dumb luck, spaced 8 months apart.  The second two, were found on the same day, but were the lucky results of being invited to a rich spot by a buddy who I feel I will always 'owe' for the experience.  The 5th, several months later, was after a lot of hard work and perseverance.  In total, a year of going out almost every weekend for 6 grams of gold.  It took over a year and a half, from the time when I first started 'getting serious' until I swung over the first one.

After I bought the SDC, I discovered how many little nuggets I had missed and was walking over in my previous hunts.  The quantity went up, but the average weight per nugget went way down.  For me, that was just fine.  Since I don't prospect for a living, having a larger number of nugget finding experiences was what I was looking for, even though most times it doesn't even cover the costs of fuel to get there and back.  If anyone is thinking that they can buy a detector and then find the equivalent value in gold.  Good Luck.  It's the exception, not the rule.  The people who will stick with detecting will find other aspects of the hunt just as rewarding and the finding of the gold is just the 'cherry on top'.  I don't say this to discourage anyone, just to paint a realistic picture.

I was fortunate enough to score a couple of great deals on two top of the line detectors.  With that being said, one had about a year left on the warranty and the other had no warranty.  There were special circumstances with each one that made the risks lower than the possible rewards.  The best part, which was totally unexpected, was making a good friend in one of the transactions.  So you'd definitely have to weigh the options and make your best decision based on your own circumstances.  For most, especially those who are just starting out, I would suggest buying from a dealer that gives training.  Like our gracious host Bill Southern for example.  You might pay a little more to start, but you're more likely to get the desired results sooner.  Especially since time is the most precious of the things needed to find gold.  There is no replacement for good training and experience.  Of course, you have to be swinging over ground that has detectable gold and that's a whole other subject.

Thanks to all who originally replied to my first post here.  I will always be grateful for the encouragement that was offered.

Luke

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On 10/14/2017 at 12:59 PM, DOC said:

That's why an ATV is a valuable addition.  And not a RED one! 

But it is OK to have a RED RZR right?

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8 hours ago, Mike Furness said:

But it is OK to have a RED RZR right?

Hey aint nothin a rattle can paint job won't fix. AzNuggetBob

Edited by AzNuggetBob
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7 hours ago, AzNuggetBob said:

Hey aint nothin a rattle can paint job won't fix.

Most won't adhere to the plastic for long. YUP ... there are a few made for plastic applications ... I have thought about a red camo job for it! LOL! Maybe I should contact ArcticDave  ... for his camo expertise! :4chsmu1:

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