Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

Recommended Posts

Would just like to see if anyone out there agrees with me that coins don't sink, they just get covered over by grass and leaves as the years go by. I personally don't believe coins sink, I think however that there are areas where they are covered faster than other areas. In parks where the grass is constantly cut and not raked up is a prime example of how a coin can be buried by as much as an inch a year as the turf builds up. Up at my favorite lake here in Southern Oregon I've found silver coins only an inch under the dust that were lost there in the 1930s because no turf builds up over them. I believe it depends on how fast the turf builds as to how deep a coin is going to be. Only place I know of where coins may actually sink would be under water.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yup.......I agree! So many times when hunting the parks in my spare time when I can't be at the good places, I hear detectorists complaining that they need a better detector because the remaining coins have "sunk" to a depth beyond their detectors capability to reach. Sad people actually believe that

Link to post
Share on other sites

Snow,rain and ice do make the coins sink dependent upon composition of soil as nothing escapes the never ending gravity,erosion and wind blown materials-John

Link to post
Share on other sites

I too never seen coins sink into the bowls of earth. I think they just get covered up with leaf, soul , sands of time. Here in New Mexico I have found Coins floating on a Cone of sand the wind has washed out from under the coin. Crazy stuff. A coin standing on a pillar of sand that when you try to remove the coin the sand just caves in and falls down. One was a 1912 silver 5Cent peace from Canada at Ft Cody just two miles from my home. How to hell a Canadian coin got there in 1917 is your guess! Silver was Silver back then and was money. They all lived in a Tent city and you know stuff never falls out of your pocket in a tent.

Funny part was I found it on Jan 12 the same date NM became a State in 1912.

Kind of Creepy!

Edited by homefire
Link to post
Share on other sites

Snow,rain and ice do make the coins sink dependent upon composition of soil as nothing escapes the never ending gravity,erosion and wind blown materials-John

Exactly, gravity needs a little help from nature, solid soil that never gets broken up, wet, frozen, wind blow or has decomposing material upon it will never let anything sink.

My work truck and 16 foot trailer found out yesterday that water and loose soil, not to mentioned a slight gully doesn't make for a good surface to drive on or through!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Shallow coins is why i bought a compadre...but if a bulldozer has been use on the property, all bets are off....50-50 chance if a coin is found shallow or deep.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Floating or sinking really depends more upon the density of the sand, soil, clay, rock, etc that the object is resting upon.

Coins are a recent addition to the soils with no more than 300-400 years in the United States and perhaps a maximum of 3000 years in other areas of the world. A coin is not going to sink much on an undisturbed 'hard packed' soil.

A similar question could be asked of gold which has been around for millions of years. Does gold sink?

We know the answer to that question because it does not float and its density is great.

The surface area of the object, combined with the specific gravity will cause the object to 'sink' or 'float' depending on the composition of the material they are resting, water/rainfall and the time an object has been there. Water is of major concern on the sinking questions. It loosens or moves many soils.

A coin may 'sink' through soft, loose sand in the sandbox of a park or desert but it will not 'sink' in the clay field. I've found some coins at the bottom of a wash, under lots of sand while some coins on a beach have been tossed on top of sand out of a wave.

I still think that in most questions concerning coins of less than 200 years the depth of a coin on 'land' is more dependent upon additional deposits on top rather than sinking. Most places are not subject to liquefaction which is what we do when we pan for gold.

Link to post
Share on other sites

While out tonight looking for coins on the beach I came to the idea that for 'practical' purposes many things that we hunt with a metal detector are sinking. What do I mean?

I was going out on a beach that had been hunted during the day. The coins and jewelry I expected to find would be 'missed' spots and deeper coins. I have a coil that will take me down deeper than a lot of the smaller coils that I have.

I'd suspect in a park that has no wave action that many of the shallow coins have already been found.

That means that someone could have the idea that the only coins left have 'sunk' when the truth of the matter is that these coins were just deeper than old metal detectors could find.

What is the general consensus about a Civil War battle field. How did a layer of dirt come to cover most of these sites (if they were not farmed)?

Speaking of farming ... the top soil is 'living' and it would loosen with worms, ants, rodents and other microscopic life. This would allow heavy things to 'sink' so we may need to listen for some deeper things.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mitch,

"What is the general consensus about a Civil War battle field. How did a layer of dirt come to cover most of these sites (if they were not farmed)?"

How do you know they weren't farmed after the war? There may be trees now but way back then there may have not been trees. I keep thinking two words...till under.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Homefire I have found nuggets out at Rye Patch back in the day sitting atop little pillars of sand after the ungodly wind storms out there. Lucky for me too as was the mid 80s and was using the latest greatest VLF at the time.....a Fisher Motherlode 660 :4chsmu1: so long ago,sure like the newer units MUCH better-John

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hoser,

Good point about the desert.

If you are on the windy part then the coins may be more shallow as the wind blows away the sand.

The sand goes some place and I don't like to hunt on a sand dune or the side of the mountain gaining sand. Later when it rains the washes are loaded with it and the mountains can be washed cleaner.

Know your terrain. Choose your area where you get results.

Copy a hunting style that works.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing about a metal coin is that under certain circumstances water vapor will repeatedly condense on it and then evaporate. If the material beneath the coin is salty or has a lot of calcium in it, then over time the salts or calcium gradually are drawn upwards and then come out of solution and harden somewhat directly below the coin. Thus, when a strong steady wind comes along and blows away the looser sand particles, the stuff beneath the coin is a little bit stiffer -- just enough not to blow away. At SoCal beaches during Santa Ana offshore wind conditions an untrammeled sector of beach will reveal numerous "pillars" of sand with a coin (or bottle cap) resting atop of them. No metal detector needed -- just good eyeballs.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to live in Ashland, Oregon. That country is very dry in the summer and wet in the winter. I was digging a new flower bed one day and at 5 inches I found a 1966 nickel. Nothing surprising about that except that this was in 1969. I always wondered how a nickel could become buried so deep in just 3 years. After putting 2 and 2 together I came up with this: The area where I found it was mowed about every 2 weeks in the summer and no grass was raked up. The layers of mowed grass, dust, and leaves accumulated about 1 2/3 inches per year. These conditions would "bury" a coin very deep very soon. I have found that I find older silver coins at shallower depths in open areas and deeper coins under shaded areas where there are trees that drop leaves. I only have a 1987 Whites 6000 DI Pro with an 8" loop which will go perhaps 6" deep. I've never found a coin any deeper with it. Soon however I'm getting a Whites MXT Pro and will re-visit a lot of those shaded areas!

Link to post
Share on other sites

I had put up a two inch curb around my yard in Florida thinking that would stop the grass from growing onto the sidewalk. Over the course of a few months, the rains had moved sand on the yard side so it was level with the little curb I put in. I was surprised how much soil was moved by the rains. This was with a regular flat yard in Florida with no streams. It was just mother nature working to flatten the land again.

At least in Florida, I don't know where it went, but the top soil was sand, even if you cut the lawn and did not rake the grass, so I don't know where the mulch went.

Link to post
Share on other sites

.

more factors: Earthworms crapping all over the surface and the rootzone migrating upward/expanding in depth over time.

The layers of mowed grass, dust, and leaves accumulated about 1 2/3 inches per year. These conditions would "bury" a coin very deep very soon.

,,,, I think however that there are areas where they are covered faster than other areas....

Edited by weaver hillbille
Link to post
Share on other sites

That article by Carol K. pretty much sums it up for my interests

in why coins sink. A good combo of what everybody has already

posted on the topic. :brows: Thanks for the link extractor.....

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 1 month later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...