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During the year I post any number of safety related items on several forums that hopefully make our prospecting efforts a little safer and fun. The only drawback is it’s a bit time consuming to work all the forums and in some cases post repetitive stories which can be annoying.

What I'm going to ask is for folks who are interested safety related items that hopefully apply to prospecting at least most of the time is to check the Route 66 Gold Miners Club Forum, Safety Suggestions (http://route66goldminersclub.com/forum/index.php). Currently there are 28 topics posted covering killer beers, cold weather safety, stress and pet care, valley fever, some general prospecting safety guidelines, and other topics.

Hopefully this will not be a major inconvenience.

Cheers, Beers, & Gold

Chuck

KG6SYX

:old:

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Yea, Killer Beers are Great for sure. My kid tangled with some Killer Bee's one time and lost!

After that , we keep a Epi Pen in the Fridge and Car at all times.

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Edited by homefire
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I like killer beers !!!!! :4chsmu1:

Greg

Oy, ale's and stouts irritate the kidneys and liver something harsh.. Good clear vodka is the safest- for me, at least.

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I know where a whole colony of them are Gregg.

YOu can spray them with cold soapy water after sundown for a permanent sleep. Have had two colonies set up shop here that got soaped away.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Now you tell me.......

When I was single lived with a couple of pals in an old mid-fourties Phoenix neighborhood. Those new Africanized bees moved into some holes in the cinder-block fence in the back yard. We got tired of getting stung every time we fired up the lawn mower, or had a rousing, beery game of horseshoes. We were so smart.... we dropped fireworks down into the holes in the blocks - made em' darn mad...next was $40 worth of pesticides from Home depot...never killed enough of them, then I blocked the holes with caulking...they ate through it, then I mortared the holes with fricken vinyl concrete patch.....they found new holes, then we dumped the most toxic chlorinated solvents and chemicals we could find into the fence, and it killed hundreds, but they always came back, I finally filled the fence with gasoline and sparked that puppy up. I was very proud of myself until the climbing flames set the neighbor's palm tree on fire, and it took a major effort to hose the fire out, without calling the Fire Dept. and we still had to explain why the block fence was burned black, but hey, no problem, they're just bees, man.......

Ben

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Just about any dish detergent'll do to smother bees. More soap doesn't hurt but is a waste. Just a half cup'll do mixed into a couple gallons of water or whatever amount causes a fair amount of suds..

COld also screws up bees , so icecubes or chilled water in the pump sprayer is a double whammy. :evil1: Use a watering can if you want to increase the danger of getting stung . A hose end proportioning mixer/sprayer would be another option. However you can spray cold soapy water from a distance is the goal.

Use a wide soft spray while slowly approaching from downwind whilst simultaneously thinking of your happy place- glory hole of preferred element( gold isn't it?). You don't want to be stressed around them They'll smell your fear.

Deep slow breathing is important, but never breathe on a bee! CO2 stirs up their dander.

If you have to( i think you should) hyperventailate for a good minute outside of the danger are so you can then approach with silent, easy breath :brows: while approaching in your moccasins. Don't panic for nothing, either back out of there or deeper slower breeathing will calm you nerves.

:2mo5pow: If guard bees somehow are out and about and should happen to buzz around you repeatedly , bump into you, land on your clothing- consider it a warning.

:old: disclaimer:

Just remember that you are in harm's way and this should only be attempted if you are crazy enough and not allergic to bees, like pain, and it's well after dark -and offered them up on Craigslist already to any beekeeper that want's them,,,,,,,, and you're too cheap( :4chsmu1: or frugal) to call a real exterminator.

. SOme beekeepers will remove,no charge, if it's worth their while in honey, they're closeby, and/or the hive is large/easy access.. They aren't aggressive while gathering pollen so Bkprs can still use them to pollinate crops. All they do is kill only the wild queen and introduce a new domestic B queen

The original hive workers slowly dies off due to natural cuses while the new queen keeps poppin new B's.

back to soapy stuff,,, YOu won't get them all, as invariably there'll be a few to go airborne, and remnants of the comb-( if not removed- will attract new bees until destroyed.

REpeat in a couple hours or next evening if still a nuisance.

ANy and all safety gear you can think of is rec'd.

:cry2: B stings hurt

Now you tell me.....

Ben

Edited by weaver hillbille
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An friend working for a Texas Fire Department said - "Should have used soapy water, it clogs there breathing mechanism and they die in less than a minute. We train for a swarm response, we utilize Class B foam at a 6% solution and a full fog pattern on the nozzle."

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Bees are one insect I won't kill. I was wondering why we had more bees than normal this year pollinating our flowers and fruit trees and drinking water out of the pool. Come to find out the neighbor across the street had a huge hive in their garage wall with beeswax, honey and the whole shebang. He was wondering why his floor was all sticky in one corner of his garage. I called one of my dirt bike buddies who is a beekeeper and snake guy and he came out and smoked them out, ripped out the drywall out and took out huge dripping globs of bees wax filled with honey. I kinda wished he could have left a few as our fruit trees and the ones around the neighborhood have more fruit on them this year than I've ever seen.

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:4chsmu1: YOu have noone to blame but yourself for not going over there to get some of the comb to put in your own garage wall.

You still have time to establish a hive:go get some wild honey -with the comb- and stick it on a branch of one of your trees. THey'll set up shop when it's found so you can have your own hive.

Bees are one insect I won't kill....I kinda wished he could have left a few

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They're a problem when the hive is close by.. If they're well away( from the hive), they don't have a territorial bent and are just as docile as any other domesticated honeybee.

Some keepers say their patience/ferocity varies- they can be as mean/deadly as reported by the media throughout the years..........

or quite docile ,as they( well , some of them) seem to have got some manners with all the crossbreeding with local wild colonies of domestics and other wild bees here before the Africans invaded. Just the luck of the draw........

Guard bees will knock up against you and repeatedly make their presence known around you . Don't put it off as,"bees are harmless and can't fly(well)"... They can fly very well- it just looks quite clumsy in slow motion. There's an aggressive hive around and they don't want you in the area. Take heed.

Edited by weaver hillbille
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Africanized Bee's are Ugly, Period. Just a 1/2 mile from where my kid was attacked they Killed one of a old mans dogs and blinded the other. He ended up in the Hospital trying to save the dog.

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Africanized Bee's are Ugly, Period. Just a 1/2 mile from where my kid was attacked they Killed one of a old mans dogs and blinded the other. He ended up in the Hospital trying to save the dog.

Yup , I think everyone's see firsthand or heard of many a bad experience by them. AS you get farther away from the border, though, they do tend to mellow, but mellow to them is to bump you at 50 yards away from the hive.

From what I've heard about the bad one's, they'll go on attack after the sound of a mower 1/4 mile away.

Edited by weaver hillbille
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On 3 different occasions while out prospecting in the middle of nowhere, I have had the crap scared out of me by

those wild bees you talk about. They were moving en-mass, going to or from a water source, and I could hear them

coming long before I could see them. It is especially scary, since there is no place to run to, and no cover or shelter

if they would decide to attack. Has anyone else seen them out in the boonies like that?

Ben

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Ben,,,,,,,, Yup, by our house in Poway, every year at least once I hear a swarm passing by while out in the garden. They are scary , tobe sure, the first few times. The sound doesn't register, at first, since it's so spread out.

JUst crouch down and hold your breath/slow your breathing. They don't have a hive with them so not going to be that territorial, unless you want to run, scream, make noise, swat at them. The minute one stings you- they'll smell the sting and come after you.

Bryan

Edited by weaver hillbille
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On 3 different occasions while out prospecting in the middle of nowhere, I have had the crap scared out of me by

those wild bees you talk about. They were moving en-mass, going to or from a water source, and I could hear them

coming long before I could see them. It is especially scary, since there is no place to run to, and no cover or shelter

if they would decide to attack. Has anyone else seen them out in the boonies like that?

Ben

I've run into bees outside of Barstow, CA looking for water that were not Africanized Bee's and there were so many had to leave the area. I ask BLM about this and said there been one known case of Africanized Bee's around the Newberry/Roman Mtn areas but not in a number of years. So what you may have seen was our normal honey bees looking for water. But still a good reason to leave.

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Yep Ben at least once a year here. I hear them well before I can see them. A long black wavy string that looks about two feet wide and 20 yards long.

Like WH says, crounch down in a ball sort of, don't move until you can't hear them any more. I make sure my face is covered and I'm looking down between my legs.

Some hornets (here) attack your eyes. My glasses have saved my eyes many time.

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I just did a steady hike out of the area till I didn't hear the bees any more. So far, they have not attacked me,

but I'm not taking any chances - when I hunt, I don't use scented body wash, cologne, or any after-shave. I like

to be popular with the Mrs., but not with the buzzers. I HAVE been attacked many times in the Bradshaws, by

those short, yellow ground hornets with the triangular heads, and by at least 2 species of wasps, the standard,

metallic orange ones, which are aggressive, and the big, long, greenish-yellow ones that are incredibly aggressive.

Which is why it's always a good idea to have some Benadryl in the truck. Oh yeahhhhh.

Ben

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Regmag brings up a good point: YOur smell. Don't have any! Don't be mistaken for a flower :4chsmu1: .... AND never wear black- beekeeper suits are WHITE for a reason. Bee's do not like black .

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