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My full possible meteorite collection


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I found them all in the same area. 2435 is the same rock at 2 and 10 only I have cleaned it completely. I'm not sure if they are meteors but they in my opinion resemble some I have seen online. I have also uploaded the siberian meteor I bought as an example of another kind of meteorite to compare them with. Both are similar in shape and features especially the cleaned one

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post-27325-0-52131600-1409160449_thumb.j

post-27325-0-40550600-1409160482_thumb.j

post-27325-0-03115700-1409160505_thumb.j

post-27325-0-34958800-1409160539_thumb.j

post-27325-0-83240800-1409160573_thumb.j

post-27325-0-65039400-1409160598_thumb.j

post-27325-0-15474800-1409160729_thumb.j

post-27325-0-56160400-1409160760_thumb.j

post-27325-0-72872000-1409161556_thumb.j

post-27325-0-85703800-1409161690_thumb.j

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RockyC

It is really difficult to tell based on the photos,which some are out of focus. How do they react to an earth magnet? Filing a window would also help with the ID.

You can obtain more information on meteorites, by going to the " Meteorite Research, Resources, ID,etc" posted at the top of the forum. I hope this helps,

kgmrg AKA Richard

Edited by kgmrg
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RockyC

It is really difficult to tell based on the photos,which some are out of focus. How do they react to an earth magnet? Filing a window would also help with the ID.

You can obtain more information on meteorites, by going to the How to ID a meteorite posted at the top of the forum. I hope this helps,

kgmrg AKA Richard

well I as of now I believe don't have a magenet strong enough but I just bought a strong one. so I'm not actually really sure. But I bought a cheap test kit. They definitely when you look at them up close. ( you can't tell in the photo's but up close they really look like they are. I believe these are the rarer stoney kind that aren't magnetic but because I don't have a magnet strong enough I can't say they aren't magnetic 100 percent either. The one thing I can say is scratching these rocks is almost impossible. They have damaged my knife more then the knife has scratched them. They are very dense and powerful rocks/meteorites whatever they are. Most rocks can scratch and leave a mark but with these. Not at all. I've scratched many rocks. Usually rocks shatter when you hit them with a hammer but #10 was much different even in the way it broke only a clean pieces broke off the but otherwise it was undamaged by the hammer. The pointed one I found in the ground pointed side imbedded I had to literally wrestle it out of the ground. They are clearly burned and look completely different when cleaned off. Whatever they are they are extremely strong. Meteorite I cant say but crazy strong when it comes to tests I will say. I mean if you saw how clean the piece broke off it was almost as if it was superheated on. It broke of so clearly.

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None are meteorites, sorry.

It looks like the one you purchased is a piece of Sikhote Alin shrapnel, which in reality ressemble scrap iron more than a "typical" meteorite.

Meteorites do not burn.

Rocks get embedded into the ground all the time.

You cannot "clean off" fusion crust if they were meteorites.

Scratching them indicates hardness, it has nothing to do with meteorite identification.

If you suspect you've found a meteorite the last thing you want to do it try scratching it with a knife or hitting it with a hammer (!).

I would suggest visiting a museum and getting familar with what meteorites look like in person. Pick up a book or two, such as Rocks From Space, as well.

Good luck.

Edited by Mikestang
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I could not, sorry. I am a meteorite afficianado first and foremost. Your local university's geology department might help you identify them, or possible another online geology forum.

PS - A meteor is the light you see in the sky, a "shooting star". A meteorite is the space rock that lands on the ground.

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No, it is not both. The light in the sky is a meteor. The rock on the ground is a meteorite. There is no both, the definitions are distinct.

And despite what you may believe, you did not see one fall. When you see a meteor in the air it is hundreds of miles away. It often looks like it fell "right over behind that tree", but it's really hundreds of miles away. There's no way a human eye can see something a few inches across traveling hundreds or thousands of miles per hour at distances over a hundred miles. Don't worry, you're not the first to think they saw one fall, but I promise you that you didn't.

There are a few (a very, very, very few) acounts of someone seeing a rock hit the ground near them. Out of the blue, bam, a meteoroid crashes to earth near them (Ensisheim was witnessed to fall by a small boy, for example, and one fell about 6' from a man in an African village a few years ago), but they did not see it in the air because that is not possible, they just happened to be standing near where it landed at that time.

Edited by Mikestang
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I am a meteorite afficianado first and foremost.

Question… what is the average specific gravity for a meteorite?

Would a s.g. test be a good way to identify a meteorite, or are there too many earth based rocks that look or weigh similar in nature to what a meteorite would?

Just wondering… :idunno:

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Bulk density is commonly used as another identification tool when investigating meteorites. Like all the other tools (look & feel, magnetic attraction, streak color, etc.) it is not definitive, but it is handy.

http://www.meteorites.com.au/odds&ends/density.html

Edited by Mikestang
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Hey RockyC,

The best thing you can do to help in the future is to go to Amazon.com, and order a copy of O. Richard Norton's book

"Rocks From Space". You can get it for $24.21. When they have used copies in stock, you can get one for less than $9.00!

This will help you a great deal, on identifying meteorites.

Check it out, Ben

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I keep finding weirder rocks. (other types) weirder pieces of the rocks I uploaded they are different from all the rocks in the area covered in dust. I wouldn't even say burned. You are right. But it's dust. I'll upload the new strange rock.

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Rocky C,

Why ask an expert their opinion, advice or suggestions if you will ignore them? Tell us every rock you have done all the steps of basic meteorite identification rather than just LOOK at them.

Mitchel

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Something else to consider, you called your rocks "non metal", yet you are comparing them to a piece of solid iron. So why would they "look the same"? Also, the iron meteorite fragment you are looking at has been professionally cleaned, it bears no resemblance to anything you would find in the field, nor is it representative of all meteorites everywhere.

I invite you to look at more than one meteorite before proclaiming that you've found one (which, I'm sorry to say, you have not).

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G'Day Rocky C

Mike has done a good job of answering your question I also agree they are not meteorites. As for identification of the rocks you have, it would be impossible due to the image quality Some of your terminology needs to be addressed.

Meteorites are attracted to a magnet, not magnetic.That's not to say you cannot magnetize an item, constant playing with a neo on an iron meteorite will eventually slightly magnetize Placing a needle on a thread above the iron meteorite will indicate this

As for meteors, this might help

.

post-2798-0-31654800-1409413402_thumb.jp

Cheers

Johnno

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I'm still convinced a few here are. I still have to see. Some are very much like the one I bought when LOOKED at up close.

have you checked with a magnet yet,preferably a rare earth magnet and definetly not one of those flat ad thingy things lawyers send in with there junk mail.If it,or they are thats one test down and more to go..peace out,big wayne

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They are magnetic but the tiny one required a 16 lb magnet to lift. hardly strong magnetic but ONE can hang from magnet the others They can be dragged around by the magnets along the table the small piece can be lifted the large pieces can only be "Pulled" so thats one test passed for them being magnetic. The large yellow rock is NOT magnetic. so I removed that from any test. The rest are magnetic. ALL of them. So I guess they are metal not only rocky.

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