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A great day on Coyote Dry Lake


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Me and the family met up with Bryan Couch and Wayne Corlis today out at our spot on Coyote Dry Lake. After about an hour or so of hunting my wife meets up with me and shows me her "potential" find which turns out to be this beauty...a 17.5 gram meteorite...her biggest find to date! Way to go, dear!!!

Shortly after that we met up with Bryan and Wayne again and Bryan shows me his first Coyote Dry Lake find...a 30.2 gram gorgeous stone. Congrats on the find, Bryan.

We moved to a different spot on the lake (where I found my 282.2 gram piece) and as we pulled up I noticed another vehicle about a half mile away on the lake bed. I told Bryan and Wayne I was going to see if it was someone that I knew. So I drive over and it is another meteorite hunter, but one I had never seen there before. Turns out he had "talked" via computer to some great folks that I know and he was a newbie out for only his 4th time hunting. He spent ALL DAY at Coyote yesterday and didn't find anything so I invited him to come hunt with us for the rest of the day. After a short hunt Bryan and Wayne had to skedaddle, and I told Mark I wanted to take him to a different spot and see if I could put him on a meteorite.

We moved to the location and hunted for about 15 minutes and my crew had to take off. I gave Mark my number and told him to search that area well before leaving, and that we would have to hunt together again sometime. As I am driving across the lake bed on our way out my phone rings. I answer it and it is Mark! He says he thinks he just found a meteorite and asks if I would come back and look at it for him. Of course I obliged, and headed back to him. I pull up to see him kneeling down ripping items out of his backpack. I walk over and know right away that he had just found his first ever meteorite. I look at him and say, "Congratulations, buddy" and he went ballistic!!! He high-fived me, shook my hand, then told me had to hug me, shook my hand again, hollered and jumped and down (literally), and then finally calmed down enough so I could tell him to bring it to my truck so he could weigh it. As he is sanding there next to me waiting for my scale to tare, I can plainly hear him breathing like he had just finished the Boston Marathon..LOL!!! We got him all documented and packed back up, and he thanked me again and continued hunting!!

It is nice to know that there are still people out there that you can be friends with and they don't care about your political or personal views. Those types of people are getting harder to come by in this world, especially in hobbies like rocketry, gold prospecting, and meteorite hunting. So when you find them, consider yourself lucky and do your best to hold onto them.

THIS was an AWESOME day as far as I am concerned. Three finds and two of them were firsts for two people. We were very lucky to be a part of this exciting day and absolutely happy to be there to share those finds with Bryan and Mark. Folks....it doesn't get any better than this.

Samantha175gram_zpsae5174e0.jpg

Edited by Chris Coffee
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Would love to see a better photo of that ... This shot doesn't look like a meteorite to me, but I certainly could be wrong ... Is that quartz in it or ????? Cheers, Unc

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Ron, I will try to get a better photo of it today and post it. It is absolutely a meteorite. We have found more than 30 meteorites on Coyote Dry Lake since November and more than half of them look just like this. That and the weight, and the amount of attraction to a magnet is a dead giveaway for them. :-)

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Fred and Mike.......I think I may just have found the answer to Fred's question...MAYBE!!! Let me start by asking this question; "how small can a chondrule be"? In the attached photos you can clearly see, and this is so cool because of all the CDL finds we have this is the only one with it, what looks like a perfectly round chondrule protruding out of the rock. In a lot of photos I have seen of cut stones, it appears that chondrules can be of any size. So I am "assuming" that the tiny holes could be where tiny chondrules have fallen from the stone due to the weathering that Mike mentioned.

Now, this is just an very uneducated guess on my part, but it sure is an interesting question...and one I would like to know the answer to as well.

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Hi Chris,

Congratulations to your wife on her find, and also to Bryan for his first Coyote Dry Lake find. Kudos to Mark on breaking his cherry, I'll always remember my first meteorite find. Mark will never be the same. It sounds like everyone created some lifetime memories. By the way, I have seen some very large chondrules in some stones on display at The Tucson Show, but it may also be a near-surface inclusion. Maybe.

Hey Fred,

I had always read that meteorites never have vesicles, with the exception of some exotic lunars that I wouldn't even recognize unless they were VERY fresh. Buuuut.... after the Chelyabinsk fall, and all these meteorites started turning up with vesicles in a "frothy" fusion crust, all I can say, is that I believe the frothing ONLY OCCURS WHEN the bolide reaches a slow-enough speed for the lighter, ablated material to concentrate on a back, or edge, and then "froth". With the Chelyabinsk fall, the original mass was slowed dramatically by not one, but two Russian SAM batteries that records show, engaged and hit, the original mass, which obviously was not going to stop until reaching a retardation limit at a lower altitude, marked by sonic booms. So sometimes it's actually okay to be slow............................................................

Ben

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It was a great day. It was great meeting up with you guys out there for a day of hunting it was also awesome that I was able to score my 30.2 g stone I've hunted that like many times and never found anything it was nice to walk away with something this time. It was great hunting with you guys out there hope to see you in the field soon again.

Bryan

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Hi Fred,

I am good. And Erik is good too. I am doing a lot of hunting. Mostly for new material. I know the existing locations, but prefer to have

some new things to classify. I guess if I start to lose my motivation, I'll go back to working the strewnfields to have some finds, and recharge.

Hunting some gold too.

How are you doing?

Ben

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Greetings.

I'm the "Mark" in Chris's story and he told it true. I am VERY grateful for being fortunate enough to meet Chris and his family and have him generously ask me to join them in a more promising area. Needless to say I likely would have been skunked had Chris not steered me to the right spot. As I've been telling everyone, finding that meteorite was one of the most thrilling and rewarding moments of my life and I showed it. Lol.

Well met, Chris.

Mark

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Mark,

Glad to see you here on the forum. Welcome! There is a ton of great people on here that you can learn from. I, too, am very glad that I decided to go see who you were and I thank you for accepting our invitation to hunt with us. We will have to join up and hit Stewart Valley together. Congrats on the find and thank you for allowing us to be a part of it.

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Mark,

Glad to see you here on the forum. Welcome! There is a ton of great people on here that you can learn from. I, too, am very glad that I decided to go see who you were and I thank you for accepting our invitation to hunt with us. We will have to join up and hit Stewart Valley together. Congrats on the find and thank you for allowing us to be a part of it.

Stewart sounds fun. Haven't been there yet. It was nice to meet some people out there that were so generous with their time, encouragement and information.

M-

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thanks Mike...cool close-up Chris...between your theory and Mike's opinion lies a good layman's explanation....very interesting meteorites!

fred

Was just revisiting a part of Dr. Buhl's page and came across this, pretty similar to what we see on these Coyote DL meteorites (except this example has much more visible chondrules):

Fusion%20crust%20meteorite%2047k%20nwa%2

"Another meteorite with a low weathering degree of W1.

The L3 chondrite NWA 5923 however is abraded to the

unaltered chondrules which are now visible on its sand

polished and desert varnished surface"

source: http://www.niger-meteorite-recon.de/en/Meteorite_fusion_crust_4.htm

Edited by Mikestang
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  • 3 weeks later...

I would love to join any of you guys at Coyote Dry Lake of Stuart Valley, or other locations. My # is (nine zero nine) 557-5515, and I'm local to the area (Redlands, CA). I've been out at Franconia multiple times with success, but have soooo much to learn still. Thanks.

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On another note, I'm curious as to how much the Coyote Dry Lakes meteorites vary in appearance. I was out there recently with a friend looking, and only found some possible OC that look different than the ones pictured in other posts above. I noticed that the ones listed in the Met. Bull. vary from H4-H6 to L6 to LL6. Do the LL6 & L6 look different in their general exterior appearance?

Here is a photo of one possible OC that I windowed. It is a natural stone (not slag) that tested to have some nickel content with a home test. the metal flecks are scattered across the piece, as seen in the photo. What are peoples opinions of it, and are there any photos of other CDL external "looks" that vary from the other posts? Thank you everyone for your time.

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Jim, that appears to be one of the famous blackish grey wrongs found on the lake. Out of the 26 finds I have made on coyote dry lake they all pretty much look the same. They are kind of a chocolate and caramel mix of colors and will leave a brown, not dark brown by brown, streak on a tile or whetrock.

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