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ATX vs GPX

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Large nugget test, mono on GPX vs DD stock coil on ATX

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Good post Bill but what was the size of the mono coil?

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Looked like the stock 11" round mono to me.

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Very interesting comparison. I wonder what the difference in depth on both detectors would be on a smaller nugget, say 1/4 oz. At any rate the ATX is a very interesting detector. Nice to know if you passed your coil over a deep monster chances are good you'd hear it with the ATX.

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I agree and will be putting some serious time on one over the next couple months.... I will also be hoping to try the 20 inch mono for it as well as the 8 inch mono....

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Bill when my friend gets here on the 16th we're going to be doing some serious beeping with the 20" mono in the Eucalyptus trees 50 miles East of my house.

I'll keep you posted on how we do.....

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I've run both the GPX 5000 and ATX since the day they were available. Is still prefer my GPX for prospecting, mostly because it is lighter, has a better coil selection, does not have silicone lubed orings everywhere to collect dirt, uses standard headphones without a special adapter, runs longer on a charge, etc.

From a pure detecting standpoint however in the United States at least there are few nuggets one of them will find that the other will not. I can find gold about as well with either. Garrett did a great job with the electronics on the ATX, and it is a no brainer to operate compared to the GPX.

The ATX is already heavy at 6.9 lbs. when one of you guys gets that rear mounted 15" x 20" monster mounted toss it on a scale and get a total weight with batteries. The ergonomics is going to be horrible running the full 20" of the coil out forward of the rod mount location. I have not got one for that very reason - I will stick with my GPX and 18" round Nugget Finder mono, thank you very much!

Both great machines though. If Garrett sticks the ATX electronics in a light weight, dry land dedicated prospecting housing with standard coil and headphones connectors plus lightweight coils Minelab is going to have something to worry about. As it is the ATX is a lot of bang for a couple thousand bucks if you can put up with the ergonomic shortcomings. Mind you, all those shortcomings turn into a plus in the water. The ATX is a killer waterproof detector, perhaps the best I have ever owned.

Steve Herschbach

http://www.detectorprospector.com

Edited by Steve Herschbach
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I would like to see a big nugget test done with the ATX using a Mono coil. (Since DD Coils are known to lose 20% depth vs the same size mono)

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Thanx much Bill and Steve as buying a dedicated water machine this spring(from Bill only) and ALL info greatly appreciated. My only caveat is--finding SMALL nuggets in a real world situation and not a 5+ oz massive chunk don't really prove that much to me as just not that many left out there. Thanx again for the additional input. Weight under water will be at least 20% less and not huge coils either. Speaking of coils , are they replaceable on both units at home/boonies??? Earphone also question as summer heat 115+ on full cuppers fill with sweat. Steve lube points????....yuck-John

Edited by Hoser John

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Hi All, I am with Steve on the weight and use the Minelab Pro-Swing 45 harness with the Garrett ATX as I do not like the harness setup supplied by Garrett. But as Steve said looking past the weight and balance being different than I am used to I really am surprised by this new PI from Garrett and it's ability to hit small gold targets in my testing. I now have one I can spend some time in the field with and will share my experiences as time passes.

I also still prefer my GPX 5000 and with the different settings available on the Minelab I can see a definite advantage in depth on larger targets once the GPX is in the proper settings with a proper coil. This should though be expected for a 3000.00 difference in price though I would think. I will say I did not expect the ATX to be as close in performance as it is to the GPX though and so simple to set up and use. Also not having to learn and setup each timing and learn all the settings to properly use the ATX is pretty cool especially for someone new to PI detectors as the ATX is basically a turn on and go detector...

I am looking forward to trying the 20 and 8 inch mono coils on the ATX and again will report what I find. What I am seeing so far is a dang good PI from Garrett for someone not wanting to spend almost 6000.00 on the top of the line Minelab, but still have a top of the line PI capable of finding gold along side the big boys :head:

There are as with any comparison pros and cons from both sides, but this new PI will be making some nice finds and leveling the playing field a bit me thinks....

So far what do I think? Bravo Garrett...

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All I can say is it is about time another company put forth some serious competition to Minelab. If they do a bit of re engineering to make a lighter dry land version Minelab will be losing some business for sure........

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I should also add that there is a adapter available in accessories for the ATX that allows for standard 1/4 inch jack headphones to be used... The weight difference is not as great as we are making it sound really as only a couple pounds, but still no problem swinging all day with a tether....

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Thanx much Bill and Steve as buying a dedicated water machine this spring(from Bill only) and ALL info greatly appreciated. My only caveat is--finding SMALL nuggets in a real world situation and not a 5+ oz massive chunk don't really prove that much to me as just not that many left out there. Thanx again for the additional input. Weight under water will be at least 20% less and not huge coils either. Speaking of coils , are they replaceable on both units at home/boonies??? Earphone also question as summer heat 115+ on full cuppers fill with sweat. Steve lube points????....yuck-John

Hi John,

The ATX is as good or possibly even better on small gold than the GPX out of the box. You need a small accessory coil on the GPX to pull ahead. I had no problem finding small gold in the real world with mine - http://www.detectorprospector.com/steves-mining-journal/gold-nugget-detecting-with-garrett-atx.htm

Weight underwater is more like 95% less. I just scored a bunch of rings in Hawaii with my ATX and have over 50 hours of water time with it. It weighs maybe 1/2 pound underwater, so it will settle on the bottom.

You are familiar with the Infinium. The ATX has the same silicone lubricated orings on the headphone and coil connectors plus on both of the two battery doors. They love to collect dirt and so care is needed to keep them clean. The coils are replaceable but unlike on the Infinium each ATX accessory coil includes the entire telescoping rod assembly. This makes the accessory coils very expensive, as bad or worse that GPX accessory coil costs. I believe it will also limit the number of coils that will be produced. Right now you have the stock coil plus a round 8" mono and huge 15" x 20" mono accessory coils. Infinium DD coils will work on the ATX (Infinium mono coils will not) if you chest mount the control box, which I have done with mine.

Like Bill says you can get adapter and use whatever phones you like. Garrett phones included are not half bad. You need Garrett accessory waterproof headphones if you wish to fully submerge the detector and headphones. The supplied headphones let you stick the detector underwater but you must keep your head high and dry. The cord can go under, just not the actual headset.

The ATX is a superior water detector and I am going to use mine in California low water rivers this summer to look for gold.

Mind you, I do not want this to look like I am recommending an ATX over the GPX 5000. If you have the money the GPX is the way to go. But Garrett did a great job at less than half the price. The ATX is a very capable detector and if Minelab did not exist it would be the best prospecting PI on the market. If you want waterproof it is a no-brainer.

Edited by Steve Herschbach

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Thanx much for all the great info. Will watch the video a bit later as have a appointment at 8am and must keep moving along. Lots of +- to cogitate. My ol'Infiniumn sure kicked butt in Kauai at Hanalei and Poipou beaches. So cool to see all the turtles,and sharks,hanging out down by Spouting Horn cliffs. Just might be time for my second minelab????thanx and respect guys-John

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I was in California a few days ago and brought my ATX to try out on the beach. This was my first beach hunt ever and I spent a day hunting north of Dana point. It was low tide so I hunted mostly the lower shelf of the beach trying to more or less avoid the waves. I found more bobby pins than anything else, at least 30 of em, that was kind of a surprise! And around 20 coins, no jewelry. The biggest surprise was the depth, absolutely nothing was less than 6". All of the coins were 8" to 15" deep and several were simply too deep to dig! The words "dig faster" come to mind. My sand scoop is 15" long and whenever I reached that depth it seems a wave would wash over it and fill the hole back up! I don't know what the trick is to dig the deep stuff? I gave up and moved to another target....

I ran the sensitivity at 10 or 11 with good results and fairly quiet. Setting at 12 or 13 was a bit too noisy. Ran the threshold a bit louder than I use in the desert to overcome the noise of the waves.

Not sure why everything was so deep, maybe VLF machines have already picked up the shallower stuff. Or more likely the dynamics of beach erosion and deposition play a bigger role. Whatever, I had a great time and gained some valuable experience....jim

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As a former well experienced beach comber back in NH and ME I found that targets along the low tide line face a lot of wave action and the shifting sands are as you found fairly fluent ... not unlike the gravel in a gold pan ... the heavies go deep ... coins and rings are the 'heavies' at the beach.

Mike F

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So Mike which is best to hunt, the low tide line or further up the beach from it away from the waves?

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I always did best at the low tide line especially on the full moon and the new moon tides because they were extra low. The dry sand only gave me an occasion coin or three and sometimes a piece of jewelry that was put aside so it wouldn't get lost in the water only to get covered in sand and lost until I found it. Never pass up the low tide line ... BUT ... dig fast as the next roller will fill that hole faster than you can dig out.

Mike F

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Mike a month or two ago someone on here had a video showing them digging on the beach with what looks like a scoop shovel with holes for sifting sand. Do you remember that? It seems like it would be a great scoop for the beach.

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Beach sandscoops made by keene and many mfgrs. Only get the short 12" handle as longer handles will kill your wrists and elbows as that geometry of weight farther away from the body gets ya quite fast. Example for newbies-hold a 5 lb weight in your hand,by your side for 5 minutes-now hold out your arm straight out and hold for 5 minutes :arrowheadsmiley: wow what a difference,now do it a few 1,000 times and ouch-John :brows:

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Would a clamming tube help? I use to have a horseneck clam tube for digging clams, keeps the sides of the dig from collapsing. Maybe one in PVC or ABS would work better at the beach.

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Thanks HJ for the advise.....sounds good

GJ thanks for the info but being a land locked critter I don't have a clue....any pics?

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Garimpo ... They make all kinds of sand scoops. I had one of the short handle ones and one of the long handle ones that you could step on ... great for the older generation beach hunters so they didn't have to bend do so much. Both of mine were very heavy gauge stainless steel ... especially the step on one. The holes in the scoops were a little smaller than a dime so that coin could not escape. Both worked very well in the surf ... but still had the problem of holes filling faster than you could dig at the water's edge. Any good detector shop along the coast would have various ones. Figure to pay near $200 for a good long handle step on variety. The shorter one should be in the neighborhood of $100 give or take depending on the gauge of the ss and strength of the handle. Best to hold one in your hand before purchasing to be sure it is sturdy. Don't scrimp on the step on model or you will be very discouraged and out a lot of money.

Mike

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