Jump to content
Nugget Shooter Forums

good gun cleaning kit


Recommended Posts

Based on the thread about the .17, I can see that I don't really have a good cleaning kit.

Mine is 50 years old...

What would be a good "all around" kit that would cover .17 and up? Or, is there such a thing?

To be more specific, a kit that I can use not only for cleaning bores, but when I breakdown pistols, bolts, reloading equipment., etc.

Edited by LipCa
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A string with weight attached to one end and tie on what ya need on the other end. Drop it down the bore and pull it through. It's worked for me for some 50 years. Don't know why it would not work for you for a few years. KISS ( Keep It Simple Stupid) Start with a Patch wet with Hoppies #9 if that does not do it then a bit of 000 Steel wool and Hoppies will. One or two times down the Bore will loose any Leading and gick.

My dad would do the 000 thing to his new Barrels to pre weir them and did 1" at 200 yards no problems.

Edited by homefire
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A string with weight attached to one end and tie on what ya need on the other end. Drop it down the bore and pull it through. It's worked for me for some 50 years. Don't know why it would not work for you for a few years. KISS ( Keep It Simple Stupid) Start with a Patch wet with Hoppies #9 if that does not do it then a bit of 000 Steel wool and Hoppies will. One or two times down the Bore will loose any Leading and gick.

Ditto...

I use bore snakes for cleaning the barrels in all my guns. Brush and wipes for the rest. Been using these for years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use the bore snakes but only as an interim stop gap between cleaning. Back east whitetail season there is a lot of rain and/or snow depending whether it is early or late November. The bore snake is the perfect tool to run up the barrel to dry it out just in case there is moisture in the barrel at the end of the day. It is NOT a substitute for a true bore cleaning. JMHO of course.

Mike F

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually if you use Homefire's method with a clean patch every time it would be

better than a Boresnake. The Boresnake will collect grit and dirt,plus the glass from

primers. After the first pass when it is clean, you may as well use valve grinding compound.

Just like using a dirty grease rag to wipe a bearing journal. The more times you pull it

through after the first time,the more contaminated it gets,then you have a bore file.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How does a bore snake remove copper? Or lead?

Metals plating to the bore in the first few inches in front of the chamber is the only cleaning concern after a couple patches.

That aluminum rod is what they use to lap a bore. Aluminum is soft enough to embed with abrasives. So is the coating on a coated rod. The abrasive material on the rod is exactly why you don't want it dragging across the leade. If you think a soft bore snake gets abrasive an aluminum rod with a coating of aluminum oxise is EXACTTLY how a bore is lapped.

A stainless steel rod will not embed abrasive and it is softer than your barrel. If you wipe it down and use a rod guide it is as good as any rod.

A one piece rod is sinmply straighter and does not offer so mmuch contact. It also is stronger because it does not have threads. Its cleanetr as it does not have joints to catch crap.

Every barrel manufacturer will repeat this exact mantra. They will all also tell you to use a bore guide and clean in only one direction...with the shot. Never pull a patch back through a bore. Imagine wiping your fanny back and fortg instead of one direction! That is like pulling a patch both ways. And a bore snake is like wiping your fanny with a manilla rope. Over and over in an endless loop!

For any of you that have a few hundred rounds of hunting bullets and have been cleaning with a bore snake only...Go to a gunsmith with a borescope and have him show you why you need to control copper. He can show you a picture and will explain exactly how it drops out of plasma vapor and plates itself in front of the chanber. Ask him to correlate accuracy and pressure with this copper buildup. For heavens sake don't take my word for it....I'm a liberal.

Every barrel manufacturer agrees on the basics. Don't drag anything along that barrel that has crap on it. Not a rod, not a dirty patch, not a pretty rope endorsed by some goofball in Field and Stream.

The whole idea is to get it clean. Three or four patches will clean everythhing off but metal on metal. Lead needs a bronze brush and copper needs a brush and chemical copper cleaners after every 150 shots or so, depending on the barrel and cartridge. A bore paste shoul be used to remove copper every 1000 shots or so.

The tried and true method of gun cleaning SUCKS. Every gunsmith out there makes his living stripping bores of copper and restoring accuracy. And a lot of guys damage their rifle more cleaning it than shooting it when they repeatedly drag a misaligned rod across the leade or the muzzle. Almost every "old timers" rifle has throat erosion and a groove at 6 oclock where that rod scraped back and forth.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Emmmm. Guess I've done it wrong for 50 years shooting 1" and less at 100 yards.

Just think how good it would shoot if you got all the copper out of that filthy barrel!

Unless you have done something to remove it it will build up to the point it affects accuracy. Theere is really no other way to lay it out. Lead is a little different in some calibers like .22 lr. But any hiigh powered rifle will copper up sooner or later.

A chrome barrel and FMJ will go 2000 sometimes. A fast bugger like a 22-250 with soft copper hunting jackets will do it in 50 rounds if the machine work is new and rough.

It is a fact of life whether you knew it before or not. Cold hard facts of life and all marksmen acknowledge that...or at least most of them do.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is what Kreiger says about it. They make barrels for a whole bunch of manufacturers.

http://www.kriegerbarrels.com/Break_In__Cleaning-c1246-wp2558.htm

This is a procedure for break in but it explains copper in the leades and how it all works.

...Do you really think I am talking out my azz? You may not like what I am saying but I know my stuff when it ciomes to firearms. You certainly can clean your gun however you want. I offer my input simply as food for thought.

Here is what Hart says.

http://www.hartbarrels.com/services.php

....and Lilja

http://www.riflebarrels.com/faq_lilja_rifle_barrels.htm

Lilja even did a borescope video...

Shilenn makes a fine barrel. I have two . Here is what they say.

http://www.shilen.com/faq.html#question11

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't think your talking out your azz but it seems not to have bothered me in my life time. Always hit what I shoot at. If I don't worry about that crap I can have time to worry about other things that do effect my life.

Maybe the Hoppies and 000 was doing more then I knew?

Edited by homefire
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A bore is not lapped in with an aluminum rod. After using a button or broach to make the

rifles, a lapping plug is made. They pour lead in the first two inches of the muzzle ,let it

cool, extract it, then fit it to a rod. Lapping compound is applied to the bore and lapping

plug . The plug fits the bore,and rifles perfectly ,because it was cast to fit. Just a few strokes

through a barrel is all that it takes to polish the rough spots.

I have actually watched real gun makers build barrels,it ain't rocket science.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They use an aluminum button too. Any soft metal that will hold abrasive. That is the whole point. THE ROD CONDUCTS ABRASIVES.

And that is why EVERY BARREL MANUFACTURER RECOMMENDS A BORE GUIDE AND A COATED ROD.

Right back to where we started from...gun cleaning. Not bore lapping.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They don't just pour a lead plug because it is soft and will hold grinding compound.

They use lead because when it is poured into an individual barrel it is an exact match

to that barrel. Lapping compound will stick to just about anything including hard steel.

By the way it is a lapping plug,not a button. A button is used to form rifles under extreme

pressure,as opposed to a cutting them with a broach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They don't just pour a lead plug because it is soft and will hold grinding compound.

They use lead because when it is poured into an individual barrel it is an exact match

to that barrel. Lapping compound will stick to just about anything including hard steel.

By the way it is a lapping plug,not a button. A button is used to form rifles under extreme

pressure,as opposed to a cutting them with a broach.

They use a piece of aluminum fitted to the bore too. Nowdays more often than lead because they can make it expand and contract with temperature. They use cryogenic gas and a laser to make it fit tighter or looser to maintain exact tolerances as it runs through the barrel.

...just thought you'd like to know.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah right Bob

I got my knowlege from actual experience,not listening or reading crap by self proclaimed,

gun writers and gurus. I just happened to spend a few hundred hours working in a machine

shop that built barrels on contract,along with other gun parts.

I didn't build the barrels,but over a period of time,I observed the whole process daily.

Barrel makers are just like any other business. They like to save every penny that they

can ,and tend to stay with time proven methods. The plugs are cleaned remelted and

the lead is reused over and over. It makes a precision lapping tool . Each barrel takes its

on unique plug for lapping. That is why a new plug is cast for every individual barrel.

Fast,cheap,easy,reusable,totally acurate,and no hocus pocus with tinkering around with

aluminum. No guides are used for the lapping process either,just a rod,plug,grinding

compound,and elbow grease. To lap correctly you have to be able to feel the imperfections

in the barrel through the rod.

And you are wrong about old dogs,I have spent my whole life learning,and still do. I wasn't

working there for the money,and wasn't really interested in the barrels. I was there to learn

some tricks firsthand,from a master machinist,for my own benefit,and interests.Hell when

I was just a kid,I fed cows all winter for an old watch maker,just to see how those itty bitty

watches were made. I couldn't build a watch,but I learned how it is done,and made a couple

great friends.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah right Bob

I got my knowlege from actual experience,not listening or reading crap by self proclaimed,

gun writers and gurus. I just happened to spend a few hundred hours working in a machine

shop that built barrels on contract,along with other gun parts.

I didn't build the barrels,but over a period of time,I observed the whole process daily.

Barrel makers are just like any other business. They like to save every penny that they

can ,and tend to stay with time proven methods. The plugs are cleaned remelted and

the lead is reused over and over. It makes a precision lapping tool . Each barrel takes its

on unique plug for lapping. That is why a new plug is cast for every individual barrel.

Fast,cheap,easy,reusable,totally acurate,and no hocus pocus with tinkering around with

aluminum. No guides are used for the lapping process either,just a rod,plug,grinding

compound,and elbow grease. To lap correctly you have to be able to feel the imperfections

in the barrel through the rod.

And you are wrong about old dogs,I have spent my whole life learning,and still do. I wasn't

working there for the money,and wasn't really interested in the barrels. I was there to learn

some tricks firsthand,from a master machinist,for my own benefit,and interests.Hell when

I was just a kid,I fed cows all winter for an old watch maker,just to see how those itty bitty

watches were made. I couldn't build a watch,but I learned how it is done,and made a couple

great friends.

What does any of this have to do with gun cleaning? How does this relate at all with the recommendation to use a rod guide when cleaning? What is your point?

This all evolved from me pointing out that you don't want to rub anything across the leades. Not aluminum, not a coated rod, not anything. Abrasives stick to the rod or embed themselves in soft metal.

All gun makers and barrel makers are in agreement with that. I posted detailed explanations and videos in support of my posts. It is clear that there is something valid to what I am saying.

Sawmill is out in left field trying to prove he has more first hand knowledge of the barrel making process. This has no bearing on the topic nor does it relate to anything that is being discuussed. It is simply an attemt to refute some element of my post. Why this is important to you I don't know Sawmill. I can assure you no one else wants to hear it.

Our discussion is no longer about gun cleaniing. This is a mission for you of some sort. I think it sucks that we can't discuss the finer points of gun cleaning. If it wasn't some sort of manhood challenge with you we might.

I won't post on this subject anymore. We have seen the range of knowledge on the subject and there is not much more to say about cleaning a gun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

John,

I have the same old kit I probably got when I was 8 years old(first gun) back in the 50's. Alum. rod, patches and brushes.

I just run stuff through until it comes out clean.????

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well Bob understanding the bore and how it is done ,has a lot to do with cleaning said

bore. You are the one that went off on your aluminum rod crusade, Like most fellows on

here I have aluminum rods that are 30 or fourty years old ,and guns that are older. You

couldn't rub a scratch on your fingernail in a week with one of my rods.

My point with the Boresnake is not how it will scratch ,but with the grit it gathers and

re deposits ,if it is repeatedly ran through a barrel ,without changing or cleaning it. It is

not the snake that does the damage. It is that mean old bullet zipping through the barrel

under massive pressure and speed ,gathering all the grit that wipes out your rifles.

Most off the rack sporting rifles ,still have most of the tool marks,and are quite rough.

The grit can gather in those rough spots.

I reckon this may be hard to explain to a feller that uses an exploding plastic pistol to

chase tweety birds. Yeah I am still learning ,I kinda have figured out why you dog

attacked you too. :ROFL:

Edited by sawmill
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...