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What is the view in the modern Meteor community about the Eaton Co. "copper" Meteorite?


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Hello, new guy here, Im looking for any information on the Eaton Co. "copper" meteorite that Harvey Nininger found in the 40s...I want to compare it to something I recently found that appears to be a copper/iron alloy of some kind with very unusual mottling on it. I want to compare mine to this one.

I read that it has been discredited by others afterwards (NOT HARVEY) as a bearing/bushing from a ford tri-motor engine. Planes were rare in those days much rarer than now.. And Harvey at the time did his homework, trying to verify this, and there were NONE confirmed over the area let alone one with engine problems ever found or one that threw a bearing. (throwing a bearing like this means that engine was shot). Not only that, if a bearing was thrown out then it should be able to be duplicated again or another one found afterwards,

Harvey spent the rest of his carreer trying to discredit this fall/find but was unable to. He also couldn't duplicate the surface no matter how he tried. From what I read Harvey tried unsuccessfully to replicate the surface for years, using the materials no matter how he tried, to debunk the fall/find. He considered it a genuine fall I guess. some say it failed some tests later that didn't support it. . Im not sure about all of that.

Questions from a Gnoob:

1. anyone know where the Eaton Co Meteorite is currently?

2. anyone have any colored pictures of it or links to pictures of it ?

I couldn't find any only these blurry BW... from years ago.

Im amazed as a Gnoob to this study of Meteor's (no nothing) that one of the most famous/Controversial Meteor's ever found or collected and CONFIRMED by one of the most famous Meteor Guys of his time- H. Nininger HAS NOT ONE Color PICTURE on the net? why is this? I'm stunned.

3. Does anyone think there can actually be copper meteorites, (still seems a debate about this) ?

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Edited by metalman333
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Research it! We all have the ones we are interested in. Mostly ones that we think might have more laying around.

Lots of mets are "controversial". Nininger cataloged many and travelled all over networking with people. There are references and clues on every meteorite known in the MetBull. Every one of those papers has a bibliography. All scolarly work on a specific met is journalized and can be found fairly easy. The University of New Mexico at Albuquerque is the official home of the scholarly efforts and has a lot of info. You gotta dig for it. ASU is into mets as well as a few others. If it is official you will find reference to it in these places.

Then there is the unofficial research by individuals. Lots of mets are known better by rockhounds or hunters or locals near a fall area. Sometimes there are news articles, writings or other historical records.

The work in researching a fall is something you are going to have to do. Go out and get what is there on your favorite met and learn what you can. Don't be surprised to find there is more to the unknown and the unknowable than there is known about any of them.

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I already have been.. I e mailed the UNM there is not a good number I found to talk to a human, I guess they don't ID meteors anymore either..:(

I did a search for it on their site and nothing.. just amazing WHY I should have to dig for something so controversial and well known?

I don't mind researching that's half the fun, the question is WHY is it so hard to find this puppy?

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It's not a meteorite, just like yours: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php?code=7765

And please stop mis-using the term "meteor". As I have explained on a few occasions a meteor is a light phenomena in the sky, a meteorite is what you find on the ground. Gotta start with the basics, my friend.


3. Does anyone think there can actually be copper meteorites, (still seems a debate about this) ?

No, and there is no debate among peer reviewed science.

Edited by Mikestang
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It's not a meteorite, just like yours: http://www.lpi.usra.edu/meteor/metbull.php?code=7765

And please stop mis-using the term "meteor". As I have explained on a few occasions a meteor is a light phenomena in the sky, a meteorite is what you find on the ground. Gotta start with the basics, my friend.

No, and there is no debate among peer reviewed science.

I have heard it called a "meteorwrong" which I thought was kind of funny. still no color pictures of it?

Edited by metalman333
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what I find interesting about this story that makes me think its legit fall, is that Foster who saw it fall, said it made a buzzing humming sound, looking at it I can believe that it would have made some sounds as it flew.it might have been elongated due to the melting of the metal on entry and with the tumbling/heating/spinning it expanded outwards so far it almost came apart. Possibly this odd one did not fully separate but cooled just enough to stay together, so instead of two you had one frozen hunk of metal, in the act of becoming two but unable due to cooling. If it had not cooled at that moment, there might have been two he might never have heard them, and or it hit so close to him, it could have killed him. :)

In Michigan as a young teen I saw a shooting star (meteor) and I could have sworn it made a buzzing sound..back then, I thought I imagined at time, never told anyone about since I figured they wouldn't believe me and I wasn't sure myself If I could have heard one falling.. I saw it fly over a dune I guess it landed in Lake Michigan. I remember the sound matched the intensity of the meteor, and their seemed to be more fallout behind it than normal one.. it kind of sounded like a buzzing sound.. Bzzzzzzzzzzzzzttttt...very quick

Edited by metalman333
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You are all fired up!

Go out and find a real one now. Pack a lunch because it is probably gping to take all day....

Get yourself a copy of O. Richard Nortons "Rocks from Space". It is a good read in laymans terms and it will keep your learning curve going for another few weeks. Much of what we are covering here is explained in detail.

Welcome to obsession. Don't be surprised to find it is a rocky road.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Lol "Rocky Road" bob..... fummy!

ITs a blast, I love researching things

Ya gota keep going out and digging, cuz you just wont know if you don't go....

Sometimes its just as you said earlier, the real "treasure" is not found in what you actually find, but what you find in the ADVENTURE along the way before and afterwards... this has been my experience with metal detecting in general. for whatever reason something you have to dig for becomes more important to you somehow it has more "worth", Even the small act of passing the hand over the coil finally locating --------- is incredibly fun.

As you said Bob, stuff you learn unexpectedly along the way...makes life rich. like story of Nininger and the elusive/controversial "copper" "Meteorite" (With Zero clear pictures I could find so far on Net), and no one here is providing any clear pictures or links to prove me wrong. (please post pictures if you have a link I would be very interested to see it regardless of what I have found) the use of thermite out there is interesting to me, how they repair train rails/grounding wires, very interesting stuff.. Also the look and facts about nickel's ferric/magnetic properties, the reason why if nickel is magnetic nickels don't stick to magnets (not enough iron present) also the possibility of heavy metals and near solid copper in meteorites, a new meteorite museum a few miles away where I can take my finds and hopefully some FALLS...., it just amazes me. We have had a lot of showers lately im sure there are REAL ones out there, which you will confirm if I keep going, I will find something im sure. (since this one seems to be slag of some sort in your opinions and Im starting to agree...) And yes. the only way to figure out what I have is to figure out what I have as was posted in beginning I would be interested to know. I will eventually have it assayed and do the file tests you recommended. If I had to guess, copper/nickel/lead/iron mostly maybe some lead. The nickel it what might be magnetic due to the amount of steel/iron in this. It feels like lead in the hand. I think it would look amazing cleaned up, I really do, im really tempted to bust all that black crust off....to reveal what's underneath.



I will continue to post what I find im just getting started!

Btw Here are some shots of the coins I found my first week using a detector (seems im good at finding copper ) these are copper/copper bronze and were confirmed authentic, and to be 360AD. Not worth much, $$$ but amazing for me to find my first week out, and using a detector, I took a lot of crap for posting my story, But they turned out to be real, so you NEVER know what you have till you ask! :)

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Edited by metalman333
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Metalman,

If you have a scanner/printer, you'll get much better close up images than you will using your cellphone, just place the object on the glass, close the lid as much as possible and scan it.

You might want to post your coins in the "Coins, Treasure and Relics Forum" for other members that might not check out the Meteorite forum.

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Metalman,

If you have a scanner/printer, you'll get much better close up images than you will using your cellphone, just place the object on the glass, close the lid as much as possible and scan it. great idea thanks for the tip will try that and post some pictures....very cool if it works.. Using a loop is tricky I don't have a macro lense yet I own a nice camera that I could use.. but if this idea works why bother? :)

You might want to post your coins in the "Coins, Treasure and Relics Forum" for other members that might not check out the Meteorite forum.

sure was thinking that too!

I just tried it and it does work, very well.. (I need to zoom it ahead i think) but with the wear on my coins you lose the reveal/relief due to direct lighting. I found it was better to light from side and tilt the coins. This gives the shadows that help reveal the detail. Maybe I can simulate this when I scan. I will keep working on it though, very interesting. I will post a few of them lit flat and try tilted as well... So you can see :)P

Edited by metalman333
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Hi Bob and all,

If you haven't already check out my Nininger Moments on the Eaton, Co (see link). I guess I am on the fence post on trying to decide if it's real or not.

Nininger was a highly trained meteorite hunter and gave it some credit. He had over 20 years under his belt at the time. He was also good at weighing people's statements and if they were true or not. The finder was a creditable person. The fact he heard it whining from the fall lends some truth. Weather it was from a plane or not is hard to say but Nininger checked out flights at the time of the fall and found none. They were rare at that time also.

The negative thing about it is its chemical makeup. Still could be a rare type that has only fallen a few times and perhaps not always found. I respect the metbull and scientists that have labeled it an non-meteorite. Still one can keep an open mind.

Location might be with the main Nininger Collection in Tempe, AZ., if the family didn't hang on to it. You might contact Huss's son and see if he would address your questions. He is a meteorite researcher. I'll try to dig a bit in my libary and see if I can find any other information on it. Good luck and have fun!

--AL

http://www.meteorite.com/nininger-moment-13-the-eaton-colorado-meteorite/

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Hi Bob and all,

If you haven't already check out my Nininger Moments on the Eaton, Co (see link). I guess I am on the fence post on trying to decide if it's real or not.

Nininger was a highly trained meteorite hunter and gave it some credit. He had over 20 years under his belt at the time. He was also good at weighing people's statements and if they were true or not. The finder was a creditable person. The fact he heard it whining from the fall lends some truth. Weather it was from a plane or not is hard to say but Nininger checked out flights at the time of the fall and found none. They were rare at that time also.

The negative thing about it is its chemical makeup. Still could be a rare type that has only fallen a few times and perhaps not always found. I respect the metbull and scientists that have labeled it an non-meteorite. Still one can keep an open mind.

Location might be with the main Nininger Collection in Tempe, AZ., if the family didn't hang on to it. You might contact Huss's son and see if he would address your questions. He is a meteorite researcher. I'll try to dig a bit in my libary and see if I can find any other information on it. Good luck and have fun!

--AL

http://www.meteorite.com/nininger-moment-13-the-eaton-colorado-meteorite/

thanks al really appreciate any information, joe dirt led me to this story regardless if my object is copper slag, it would be interesting to see this controversial "pseudo meteorite" up close and in color with some pics? Also am wondering if it was magnetic at all... thanks again for any information you can provide.

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