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if gold has NO magnetic properties then ?????


Jim Gilmore

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Copper, silver and gold is diamagnetic. Some elements display magnetism at extreme temps. There are ony three elements that are magnetic and a fourth that is almost.

Iron , nickel and cobalt are the only ferromagnetic elements. There are a few "paramagnetics" like gallium that exhibit magnetism at certain temps.

Now a lot of non magnetic metals can show magnetism due to iron in their alloy. Platinum is one of them. But it is not the platinum that attracts a magnet but the iron in it.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Here's something interesting about steel:

Back in the 60's when I started in the tool-making industries, learned how to heat-treat steel from an old tool-maker, that never used liquid temp gauges or heat-treat ovens with temp gauges.

This is the process used for centuries: mild-steel, oil hard, air-hard and water-hard steels all louse there magnetism at the opptium quench temp. Then you temper it to whatever it is to be used for.

To temper it for a leaf-spring, dip it in molten lead. It's a fascinating process.

Every shop I worked at, always heat-treated the small tools this way. Normally it's a one-two day service to send out.

bob

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Yep eddy currents. And as BB said, copper is NOT ferromagnetic (or gold). It's Lenz's law that produces magnetic braking. It can occur in any material that is a conductor. I didn't watch that video but I knew what it was right away after seeing the same thing before in person. :D It doesn't make the material itself magnetic though, just interactions between magnetic fields, one being induced by motion the other permanent in the magnet.

I did my senior thesis and research on linear EM mass accelerators (aka "Coilguns") which are very similar conceptually. Holmium is another that has a Curie temperature under which it becomes ferromagnetic, you can cool it with liquid Helium. It is the most magnetic material in the universe if I recall correctly (under it's Curie temp). It's paramagnetic above that temp. We bought some but it ended up being sent as powder and not a slug we could fire off so never used it.

Iron becomes more magnetic as it's cooled, or maybe it's saturation increases, or both. My memory has faded over the last 15 years. But we got like 20% power increase by cooling the steel slugs in liquid Nitrogen before accelerating them and we were running at like 7 or 8 Teslas (this is enormous) which I believe was far beyond the saturation point of steel.

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Copper, silver and gold is diamagnetic. Some elements display magnetism at extreme temps. There are ony three elements that are magnetic and a fourth that is almost.

Iron , nickel and cobalt are the only ferromagnetic elements. There are a few "paramagnetics" like gallium that exhibit magnetism at certain temps.

Now a lot of non magnetic metals can show magnetism due to iron in their alloy. Platinum is one of them. But it is not the platinum that attracts a magnet but the iron in it.

BB,

I recently found a magnetic platinum ring but it is a cobalt alloy.

Here is some other platinum alloys I looked up:

There are 4 platinum alloys commonly used in the USA.

1.Pt900/Ir = 900 parts platinum, 100 parts Iridium

2.Pt950/Ir = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Iridium

3.Pt950/Ru = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Ruthenium

4.Pt950/Co = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Cobalt

Mitchel

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Back in my evil genius days I plotted to shoot a projectile to the moon with a magnetic field traveling between two rails DaVinci style. I was going to develop the gun capable of lauching a small projectile out of earths orbit and into the gravitational pull of the moon. Then I would present the world leaders with an ultimatum. I would demand a million bazillion gazillion dollars or I would launch a ceramic coated BB to the moon.

My evil plan never got off the ground as the power source was beyond my funding. You could do it for less than $500k. Even if you didn't get the world to give you a billion gazillion dollars it would be cool to do it. Even if they gave me the money I would still push the button and shoot my magnetic BB gun at the moon....just because that is what evil geniuses do. Then make a billion gazillion on the publicity.

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BB,

I recently found a magnetic platinum ring but it is a cobalt alloy.

Here is some other platinum alloys I looked up:

There are 4 platinum alloys commonly used in the USA. 1.Pt900/Ir = 900 parts platinum, 100 parts Iridium 2.Pt950/Ir = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Iridium 3.Pt950/Ru = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Ruthenium 4.Pt950/Co = 950 parts platinum, 50 parts Cobalt

Mitchel

I'm not sure I follow you...I was speaking.of native platinum nuggets. I have no idea about alloys of finished platinum or what may make them magnetic. Natural platinum is often alloyed with iron and that was my example. Finished alloys that are magnetic with cobalt would be another.

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I had similar intentions, actually I was posing my research as a potential solution to mining asteroids and transporting the materials. The idea was that you could place one of these devices on an asteroid and shoot the ore off onto the moon and just let it crater down since, well, it's just rock. Then a moon base mining colony would drive a buggy out and collect it for processing. Or place one on the moon and fire it into the Aussie Outback, middle of the ocean, Fox news headquarters, or someplace else equally disposable in a heat shielded blast resistant capsule if it was something more valuable like refined precious metals or whatever.

Last year I applied for - and this is totally real - a position as a remote mining vehicle operator for the world's first commercial asteroid mining venture. Didn't get it, but glad to see this stuff is starting to come to fruition.

I thought it might be fun to be an evil genius at one point too. Turns out I was just evil and not very good at that either. :D

Edited by JasonG
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BB,

I was just showing that a 'platinum' ring (common use of platinum as opposed to the periodic table) can be magnetic because cobalt is used in this alloy (sometimes) and gold rings are not magnetic unless they are plated. Natural and alloy metals are not pure but if a metal is pure then the elements you list that are magnetic are the only ones.

Mitchel

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Basically, the copper is not magnet but the movement of the magnet past the copper atoms of the copper tube create a current and that creates a field,and all fields are magnetic....

SO here is the question...If blowing air creates static electricty. Thdn there would have to be a field someplace. And the gold ppassing through the field then should be getting a currect of some amout.

And the particle of gold would then have to have some magnetic property at that point.

Just ike the copper tube.

It does NOT matter if the magnet moves or the tube move.

And It does Not matter if the field /magnet is a magnet of a wire with an electric charge in it. All that is neccessary is that there is a pontential.

But static electricty can actually be very high in voltage even if it has a very low amperage.

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Magnetics is nothing but a EMF (Electro Magnetic Field) . How can gold be magnetics if it's not magnetic? By introduced magnetic fields of course. The Eddy currents your detector creates in the gold is how you can see it. There For it IS Magnetic. Plastic like PVC or others are not Magnetic. Your detector will not see them.

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3 isues back on the front cover of the GPAA mag their was a huge pic of monster nuggets stuck to a magnapik. Story showed many MANY pounds of magnetic bright yellow nuggets with iron in them that were highly magnetic. For every rule there are many MANY exceptions so never say never. Using magnets during clenups iffy at best also as think of a OREO cookie-black outer cover(black sands)held together by magnet with your gold in the middle and adios,err on the side a caution-John

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Yeah, those magnetic nuggets were full of magnetite........they were found by a friend and member of this forum... Hotrock Mike, who also wrote the story. Wait till you see the next issue... Keep a hanky close to stop the drool!

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Magnetite and hematite are very common constituents in ore veins. Both can be strongly magnetic and can cause ore to stick to a magnet....especially a neo magnet. In some areas it is very uncommon to see this and in others you can expect almost every large piece of float to be entwined with magnetite and attracted to a magnet.

Ore that has nice durable gangue material tends to stay together more and carry other minerals with it. It is chunkier and will often be magnetic due to iron. Other veins are much more oxidized and rotten and the gold specimens are less likely to hold other minerals.

One place I hunt has lots of nice gold in fairly large pieces. I have never found even one particle of rock clinging to gold. I have seen pounds of gold from the area and have detected and drywashed many ounces...never a piece that had a speck of rock in any way.

Another area that I go almost every piece is connected with rock. It is often wrapped in scoria that is slightly magnetic or in gangue that contains ilmenite, magnetite, hematite and silica. Most of the sizeable pieces are magnetic. Some are strongly magnetic.

Those magnetite nuggets sound a bit funny in the VLF. I don't use the VLF in the area much because of all the noise but the signal is definitely much different with the detector trying to sort out the confusion between the two minerals.

It is common for a sulphide vein to be oxidized in the first few feet and then get heavy pyrite or magnetite at the bottom of the oxidized zone. Whenever mechanical erosion is more aggressive than chemical erosion you will see many more pieces stuck to magnetite. When chemical erosion is more aggressive than mechanical you will see more ilmenite and silica and a lot less hematite and magnetite.

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A ferric specie. I am assuming it is a specie or species because it contains waste rock.So you might say that specie is a speci of a species containing ferric components in sufficient volumes to attract amagnet.

So there you go. a speci of a ferriferous specie. It is a fairly commom occurrence I suspect as iron and gold can be very closely associated in many veins.

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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:thumbsupanim Thanx much for the update and pic Steve. The rag has gotten better lately and that article in there was excellent,lookn' for the new issue to continue the story,thanx again for headsup as NO GPAA fan but saw that pic on front page and HAD to buy(addict I be) aloha-John :old:

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