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how they polish silver coins to where they look like chrome. I pick this one up and a mercury dime at a coin shop. The picture don't do justice to the coin but best i could do. Coin in pic was in a gold bezel.

post-26159-0-85138200-1387115049_thumb.j

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Rimshot

You can polish a silver coin really easy just put about half of a tablespoon of baking soda in the palm of your hand and add about 5 drops of water to it to make a paste, rub the paste against the coin and it will be very shiny. I use this process to clean a lot of my gold nuggets as well.

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NO coin of any value is ever polished as patena and absolute original condition-mint the best-is what ya want as values cut by 50% or MORE when messed with. Looking at it's condition, I'd say a simple polishing/buffing wheel was used-John

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I agree with Hoser, don't EVER clean or polish an old coin, it will decrease it's value, at the very least you can clean a coin in a ultra-sonic jewelry cleaner, don't use any process that involves rubbing or harsh chemicals.

The shiny mirror like coins that I think you're referring to are "proof" coins, they are minted using highly polished dies and come out of the die looking like they do, they also use specially polished planchets (the blank metal disk that the coins are made of), even a tiny piece of lint or dust on such a die or the planchet will cause the coins produced to be rejected as proof coins, after a certain number of proof coins are stamped out of these dies the dies can no longer be used to produce a proof coin as the sharp details and high quality polished finish of the die is lost due to the stamping process and is no longer of the quality to produce proof coins.

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I agree with Hoser, don't EVER clean or polish an old coin, it will decrease it's value, at the very least you can clean a coin in a ultra-sonic jewelry cleaner, don't use any process that involves rubbing or harsh chemicals.

The shiny mirror like coins that I think you're referring to are "proof" coins, they are minted using highly polished dies and come out of the die looking like they do, they also use specially polished planchets (the blank metal disk that the coins are made of), even a tiny piece of lint or dust on such a die or the planchet will cause the coins produced to be rejected as proof coins, after a certain number of proof coins are stamped out of these dies the dies can no longer be used to produce a proof coin as the sharp details and high quality polished finish of the die is lost due to the stamping process and is no longer of the quality to produce proof coins.

:goodpost:

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I'm sorry guys, but I only partly agree with you. True, key date coins or coins made with a bad die should never be polished, but the dates that are not so rare (unless they are in pristine shape) I don't think it really matters. If you watch ebay real closely you will see many coins go thru that have had a buffer wheel to them or steel wool and it does not seem to affect there price one way or the other. Junk silver coins with normal wear and tear have very little value IMO other then silver and copper value. But people do pay more for them on ebay.

A 50 cent piece is only worth a little over $7.11 right now for silver and copper value.

http://www.coinflation.com/coins/1964-Silver-Kennedy-Half-Dollar-Value.html

But after watching ebay last night for several hours and clicking on the the coins that were ending first and seeing the spikes in last 2 or 3 seconds, i don't know what to think. Most of the 50 cent coins were in average condition with a few pristine coins sprinkled in. I was not watching the carded coins only the bare coins and this is what i seen.

1919-D $24.50

1934-S $12.50

1934-S $17.55

1935-P $16.49

1935-S $17.05

1937-P $17.05

1937-S $19.05

1938-P $12.95

1941-P $16.50

1942-D $21.09

1942-P $17.05

1944-S $9.50

1918-P $18.44

1943-S $18.45

1944-D $11.99

1944-P $12.49

1945-P $15.47

1945-D $13.01

1945-S $23.41

1947-P $13.55

1945-P $8.50

1928-S $31.37

1921-P $76.51

1935-P $8.39

1938-D $42.00

1936-P $9.70

1929-S $11.00

1940-S $15.50

All of these are clearly over silver/copper value. The funny thing is I bought 30 coins at the coin shop (10/50 cent and 20/dimes) and only paid 16.5 times face value. Maybe i'll set up a coin shop on ebay hehe!!

Blake i tried soda before but it won't make it look like chrome. These are like chrome but the picture robs it of it's luster.

Edited by Rimshot
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