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wet/dry mixer

Wet/Dry Washer when MD

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Bedrock Bob,

Really enjoy your posts, you have dry sense of humor that's dryer than a popcorn fart. Use bob, because I presume you have a copyright on Bob. Your special, love ya, bob

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Thanks bob!

After ten years of this drought I suppose the humor does get a bit dry. I am glad you get a kick out of it. I sure enjoy writing.

Have a great day bob and good luck!

Bob©

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Here is what I use for digging, can remove lots of gravel in little time, and you won't be getting any chips in your eyes like a hand pick. Weighs only 3.6lbs.

Here at my base camp only had a 3/16" bit. My 1/4" bits that I normally use are at the diggings. Like in my earlier post, use only Ryobi bits. Also use an extension shank for reaching in under a bank. Worked great for digging a post hole for my mail-box on Ogbily Road near Gold Rock Ranch.

Plan to use it when MD, keep getting delayed to make the trip to Bill's for a MD.

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Can I borrow one for a weekend to give a honest opinion. I would build one but I suck at building things. Want to run it than check results from drywasher.

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Can I borrow one for a weekend to give a honest opinion. I would build one but I suck at building things. Want to run it than check results from drywasher.

Where is Gilbert Arizona? Was it the bucket or one of the tubs you want to check out? Before I built the ball bearing bucket stand, used quartz rocks to capture the bucket, but the buckets don't last as long. Thanks for the interest, bob

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I can not see this tub even compareing to a dry washer set up properly, the bucket tub is all hands on not just shoveing into a hopper at full speed .

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I can not see this tub even compareing to a dry washer set up properly, the bucket tub is all hands on not just shoveing into a hopper at full speed .

Idea of the bucket or tub is that its light-weigh, carried while metal-detecting, saving the fine gold that's undetected. Self unloading, no screening and run it all day or even a week without having to unload it.

Also very little dust, and uses gravity at it's best, gold stays in the bottom. Have always recovered gold from dry-washer tailings, never from the tub tailings. Thanks for the interest, bob

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Interesting. Will work on fabricating something similar. Do you have any pictures of the rear of the larger bowl showing how your bowl and lazy s device is mounted to pvc frame? Gracias for any other images that show fastening option.

aarchie

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With the 18" tub use a 2" shower drain from Home Depot, with a reducer, 2" - 1",then a 4-way coupler with 1" 45 deg couplers. Don't glue the legs, easier to carry. Home Depot also has 6" Lasy Susen bearings. Used a 3/4" x 6" board to attach the bearing to the detachable flange of the shower drain.

A plastic cutting board would probaly work better then wood. Though, had no trouble with wood.

If the tub you use has ribs on the bottom, then cut up a yard stick for spacers.

The 24" tub would need a 12" Lasy Susen bearing, available at Lowe'S.

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Gracias W/D. Good Hunting......

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Bob, thanks for sharing this and posting the pics. I am new to gold prospecting and was considering buying a drywasher but after reading your post I now plan to build one of your bucket units and try it out. I believe it may fit my needs. I made a total of 3 trips to Gold Basin in October and from those trips I brought back a total of 20 full buckets of pay dirt to wet pan in a tub at home. What I learned from it was that panning sucks! Was kind of fun at first but sure got old after at least 10 hours of panning. I ended up with a total of 2 grams of gold from panning, OK I guess, but it made me realize there has to be a better way. And I do all my prospecting on a motorcycle, hauling 3 sacks (50lb) of pay dirt back to my truck at a time. With your unit I should be able to just haul it around on the motorcycle and sample promising looking sites and then just bring back the concentrates to camp. A quick wet pan back in camp; should let me know which sites to follow up on. Bringing back just the concentrates will greatly reduce all that panning. I like the looks of the unit too, simple and to the point! I will let you know how it works, thanks again for sharing this....jim

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Bob, thanks for sharing this and posting the pics. I am new to gold prospecting and was considering buying a drywasher but after reading your post I now plan to build one of your bucket units and try it out. I believe it may fit my needs. I made a total of 3 trips to Gold Basin in October and from those trips I brought back a total of 20 full buckets of pay dirt to wet pan in a tub at home. What I learned from it was that panning sucks! Was kind of fun at first but sure got old after at least 10 hours of panning. I ended up with a total of 2 grams of gold from panning, OK I guess, but it made me realize there has to be a better way. And I do all my prospecting on a motorcycle, hauling 3 sacks (50lb) of pay dirt back to my truck at a time. With your unit I should be able to just haul it around on the motorcycle and sample promising looking sites and then just bring back the concentrates to camp. A quick wet pan back in camp; should let me know which sites to follow up on. Bringing back just the concentrates will greatly reduce all that panning. I like the looks of the unit too, simple and to the point! I will let you know how it works, thanks again for sharing this....jim

Just returned from Gold Basin yesterday with a brand new detector from Bill, after spending four days there. Got gold with my bucket concentrator and with the 18" tub. What's great with the bucket is while your metal detecting you can get a good sample of the surrounding area. The 18" tub works great for remote areas, for it weighs less then twenty pounds with digging tools.

Wal-Mart in Yuma doesn't carry the 18" tub no more, but does carry a 24" tub, for a two man operation. Lowe's carries 12" Lasy Susan bearing along with a good selection of fasteners and plastic pipe and fittings. Thanks for your interest and reply, bob

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Bob, I just made one of your units and it works very well! Took around 2 hours to make it. I had 3 five gallon buckets full of course grained gravel in the yard that I was holding off panning because this was stuff that did not pass through the 1/4" mesh and I figured there was probably not much in it anyway. I would have taken several hours to pan. So I tried out your bucket system. I did not glue on the ground riser and cut several sizes so I could adjust the angle as needed. I loaded the bucket with around 2 gallons of gravel and spun it around 10 times. Then scraped off around 1 gallon off the top and reloaded another gallon until all 15 gallons had been processed. It took 20 minutes to process, not too bad. Concentrates remaining at the end were just fine grained stuff, no large gravel remaining. The last pic shows the concentrates after panning, around 8 flakes and specs, not too bad considering this was course grained gravel! I am looking forward to trying it out in the field.

The action of the units was fairly smooth and easy to rotate. I do have concerns about how long the ball bearings will last in the field once fine grained sand works its way into them. But they are cheap and easily replaceable.

Bob, again thanks for sharing this, I will report back after I field test it, probably next week.....jim

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Great!! When I run the bucket, just turn it a few times and add more. The angle doesn't mean much, after a few turns the gravel should cover a third - half in bottom and level at the front, then scoop out by hand and throw more in. So just glue the front leg, can adjust by adding a rock or digging a hole. Run the bearings dry, just turn upside down and shake the dust out. Oiling them would only attract dust, and bind them up.

Notice, very little dust, and makes sampling fun. Thanks very much for your input, bob

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OK, ran out to Gold Basin yesterday to test the bucket. Went to the spot that has been producing for me. Loaded the bucket up full twice and then scooped everything out until only around 1 pint remained. Wet panned the concentrates. Not one spec of gold! Took the bucket back out and between yesterday and today ran it for over 8 hours. Here is my take on the bucket and how it works:

Bucket must be fairly inclined, like 30 degrees from ground level. If bucket is more vertical than this there is no falling action of the dirt, and thus no movement or stratification.

Best action of the bucket is to keep it rotating continuously. When this is done the dirt will fall continuously creating a sort of liquid action within the upper 6" of the bucket. When rotating clockwise as viewed from the open end of the bucket this is what happens: Dirt rises to 11:00 position and free falls to 5:00 position. From 5:00 to 11:00 the dirt is locked up. As dirt makes contact with bucket at 5:00 position the heavier solids should slide toward the bottom of the bucket. However, only the top 6" or so of dirt in the bucket will free fall. Any dirt below 6" depth is locked in a solid mass by the weight of dirt on top. So if the bucket has more than 6" of dirt in it the heavy solids are not able to get below the solid dirt. One solution for this is to reach back and pull the solids from the rear toward the front, but it must be done repeatedly, very time consuming. If this is not done and the bucket is kept 90% full and allowed to self drain then only the top 6" of the bucket is stratifying, the remaining 2/3 of the lower bucket is not doing anything. An alternative is to run the bucket 1/3 full at all times. This insures that all of the dirt in the bucket is in free fall and that any gold should work its way to the very bottom of the bucket. This requires that dirt must be scooped out by hand and here is the problem with that. The gold in the very bottom of the bucket is now in free fall also falling from 11:00 to 5:00. If the bucket is stopped to scoop out dirt care must be taken not to reach toward the back because gold that has fallen onto the top surface will be scooped out also. Only the leading edge of the fallen dirt can be scooped out and this amounts to only around 1 handful. Any more than this risks gold loss. This may be hard to visualize, but is is easily observed when testing the system. I got the best results by adding one or 2 shovel fulls. Then rotating the bucket smoothly and steadily using both hands I would reach in quickly while bucket is still rotating and scoop out 1 handful then rotate 2 or more turns and quickly grab another handful and continue. Very time consuming, although it does work. I only ran around 2 buckets each time before removing the concentrates because of fear of losing the gold. The concentrates should not be ran any less than around 1 gallon. Because of the falling action of the gold when the bucket gets low there is too much risk of scooping out gold if you try to run concentrates any less than this. I know this for a fact because I saved the concentrates until I had a bucket full. I then tried to super concentrate my concentrates by running them through the bucket again and letting the scooped out concentrates fall onto a tarp. I ran it until around 1 quart of super concentrates remained and panned it. Had some flakes, but not as much as expected. I then panned the concentrates from the tarp. They too had a few flakes from each pan, nearly as much at the super concentrates. Clearly gold was scooped out by trying to get the volume of concentrates down to 1 quart.

This afternoon a prospector I had met before (Eskel from Montana) stopped by my camp and I showed him the bucket and gave him a demo. He asked if I wanted to run my tailings through his puffer dry washer. I said sure. He brought it over and we set it up my my tailing pile and I ran it for around 1 hour and pushed 20 buckets full of gravel thru it. We emptied the tray and recovered 1/2 gram of gold. We then ran the concentrates from the bucket thru the dry washer. I had around 3 buckets of concentrates from the 8 hours of running the bucket concentrator. We recovered less then 1/4 gram from the concentrates.

So here is my conclusion from all of this. It took me 8 hours to process around 20 buckets from the bucket concentrator and from this I ended up with 3 buckets of concentrates and around 1/4 gram of gold.

It took me 1 hour to run 20 buckets of tailing thru the dry washer and recover 1/2 gram of gold.

The drywasher is very dusty, but the bucket is dusty also since it must be hand spun and your face is only 20" from the bucket opening.

The bucket is probably fine for sniping, but it cannot begin to keep up with the dry washer. The drywasher is far more efficient in terms of recovery.

I have posted this just to let others know my results before you start and maybe save someone some time. The bucket is probably fine for sniping, but in my opinion it is not a replacement for a dry washer. I believe my next project will probably be to make a small puffer dry washer!....jim

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Great!! When I run the bucket, just turn it a few times and add more. The angle doesn't mean much, after a few turns the gravel should cover a third - half in bottom and level at the front, then scoop out by hand and throw more in. So just glue the front leg, can adjust by adding a rock or digging a hole. Run the bearings dry, just turn upside down and shake the dust out. Oiling them would only attract dust, and bind them up.

Notice, very little dust, and makes sampling fun. Thanks very much for your input, bob

Paleomanjim,

Believe you were running at to steep of an angle, thereby losing the tumbling action. The same would happen with a cement mixer or a tub. With all three when the gravel starts sliding instead of tumbling it's time to unload for panning or to add more. Practice with some flatten bird-shot or BB's.

Hope this helps, bob

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I would like to see a dry washer run the tails from the drum to see the true recovery rate. with the dirt just sliding on the side of the bucket I don't under stand how it can seperate the gold from the dirt. great topic.

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back as wet/dry washer; amazed at the number of views; was 3200 when leaving my base camp may 2014;

now living in catalina north of Tucson; lot's of river rock around here; even on some hill-tops; have not met anyone here yet to do any detecting since moving here December 2014.

to keep the gravel from sliding in the plastic buckets; make some small grooves with a sharp point on the wall couple inches in the bottom or a scrip of 40/80 grit self sticking sand-paper on steel drums.

plan making gold basin in November; been without internet service since January 2014.

good to be back; thanks to all

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Finally got out for three days with my grandson to test my 24" tub. Told my neighbor artic Dave that we would get two pounds of gold out of a place never tried before. We got two shunks instead.

The 24" tub is to hard to turn when loaded with no more gravel then then the 18" tub, so back to the 18" tub.

Sand paper in the bottom of tub doesn't work. but using  the side of a utility knife making small v grooves in the bottom & up the sides every inch keeps the gravel tumbling. What dust arises from the gravel is well below your face.

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Hi all ,

I have more to add to this subject if there is interest ?

Jack .

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Always interested with more input.

Thanks, bob

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Thanks for the reply Bob , it's 2am in the morning here in Australia ,  still hot as hell in the desert where I live .

Having drunk heaps of beer I need to go to bed , but will get back  :D

Jack

 

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Back again '

I started making rotary concentrators many years back after converting a cement mixer .

I became obsessed to improve each model so I've made dozens of different designs & continue to do so .

Some of my earlier units below ........

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1 hour ago, Swampstomper Al said:

And..?

The idea is to make each model work quicker & be more efficient , I was happy with one below for a short time  :idunno:

SANY0004%20640x480_zpscddbuwqg.jpg

 

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