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wet/dry mixer

Wet/Dry Washer when MD

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Light to carry, Wal-Mart camo bucket's handle clears the top bucket with no handle. I use it for sampling. Within a week or two will be paying Bill a visit for a MD.

The large 18" tub turns on a 6" lasy-susan bearing. Wal-Mart has a 24" tub, (great for two man operation), and Lowe's carries both 6" and 12" lasy-susan bearing. Buy my piping and mounting screws, good selection from Lowe's also.

The five 5/8" ball bearings are from HF $.89

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All machines can be run dry, wet, or moist with very little dust. No more need for dusty dry-washers.

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What is it for? meaning, what is it supposed to do?

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When you find a nugget or an area you want to sample, put the surrounding gravel into the bucket and rotate, find gold stays in the bottom and scoop the top gravel off. Only have a small hand full to finish pan at home. No screening involved either. Notice the light welder's slag pick.

Practice with some lead shot. It really works well. This way there is no lugging a dry-washer back in to where you found the gold. Thanks for your interest, bob

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So instead of recovering your targets with the detector you concentrate the gravel in a bucket and pan them out at home??

I don't get it...

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It works on the same principal as a cement mixer. Wet or dry the gold is going to the bottom. Don't have a metal detector yet, but built it for MD, When a nugget is detected, most likely there is finer gold with it that is not detected. Dump the gravel surrounding the nugget into the bucket and rotate it, scoop the top gravel off and what's left in the bottom is the concentrated gravel, with the fine gold. Saves making a trip later to dry wash the area. It works fast, I mark the bags for location so I can return and run more gravel. Hope this helps. bob

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:yesss: I like my drywashers much better, job done and off ya go-John

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Can put more gravel thru my tub per hour than you could put through a dry-washer. Tub can be operated wet, damp, or dry also with less dust, that can be controlled. Another benefit is that no screening needed.

Back in 1975, Doug Morrison at the Mesquite Digging's, near Glamis CA. Doug invited me to help him run some pay-dirt. In four days I air-chiseled four yards of red-clay gravel in his wash. Took about four hours to run the un-screened gravel through the cement-mixer. Panned out over 8 ounces of gold, biggest nugget, one gram.

Met an Australian Miner, last name Eykamp, at a bar in Roll, Arizona, in 1988. He made enough money mining gold with a cement mixer in NSW, to fly his wife, two children, to London, and himself to Yuma Arizona to visit his relatives.

My 18" tub cost less than forty dollars, and with digging tools weights less than twenty pounds. Small bucket concentrator cost less then twenty dollars and weights less then ten pounds with digging tools. Thanks for your interest, bob

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I can see how your machines would work for a cheap rough concentrator,to process

a lot of dirt into a small amount of concentrates. I like the shallow tub model ,and it gave

me some ideas. Sometimes a feller just can't use a drywasher,because of damp ground,

but you can process lots of concentrates with little water in a highbanker.

Even if you did use water for the tub,you could recycle that water in a settling tub. You

would be running washed material through the highbanker in a smaller volume ,hence

less water,and less crud to contaminate your water.

I would add a mod or two,as in a 12 volt motor,and a removable classifing screen for

production. I always have a small recirculating high banker and a couple barrels of water

in my outfit. Sure beats wishing for dry dirt after a summer rain. Actually I fitted an extra

80 gallon water tank in my camp trailer too, just for those times. I think that I will whip up

one just for the heck of it. Thanks

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I would like to know what is the actual recovery rate...if u runn 96 five gallon buckets thru what will be left in my tailings. How fast can I feed it? Could I run crushed quartz rock with 300 mesh gold whats the recovery?

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If the material is damp, does it need to run with water? With damp material in a dry washer, the gold could stick to the dirt and flow out of the bin.

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Like to run gravel one week after it rains. Gravel has enough dampness that it stays loose instead of balling up. The tumbling action forces the gold to the bottom. Can run for a week or more before taking it down to a cup or two, then carry back for panning. My diggings are 1/2 mile up and over two ridges. Biggest nugget so far, 1/2 gram.

For packed gravel I use a Ryobi 18V Lithium 1/4" impact drill with 1/4" Ryobi 1/4" solid steel shank cement drills. Do not use HF two piece shanks, they will jam up the chuck, and ruin the chuck. Also use a Ryobi 18V fan for directing the dust away when the gravel is real dry.

Fine hard-rock works good in the tub. Buy a pack of case harden 3/4" steel balls from McMaster's, think there $10.00 for a pack of 25. Friend of mine in Yuma has a Blue Bowl for doing the 70 mesh and finer. Never seen a dry-washer recover ultra fine gold, like the tub can. Thanks for the interest, bob

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How long do you run the material to concentrate it? A Week?

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It takes a good drywasher about two minutes to process one cubic foot with excellent recovery. I don't see how you could fill a bucket half full, rotate it, scoop off the top gravel and collect your cons in that time.

Neither do I understand how simply rotating the bucket would concentrate efficiently at all. A cement mixer with no blades is slow as molasses and downright sucks for efficiency.

It looks like a good tester for small samples but there is no way that bucket on those cabinet rollers will process in a lifetime as much material as a hand crank drywasher can produce in a day.

At least that is my humble opinion...I can feed a drywasher as fast as I can shovel it. Imagine having to screen gravel, load the bucket, turn it around for a while and then hand scoop material out!!

I don't see it as being able to run a half yard before those drawer casters muck up good. And shoveling yardage thru a drywasher is bad enough...Imagine having to rotate it and then shovel it out!

No doubt it would concentrate gravel but there is no way a 5 gallon bucket being hand fed, turned and then hand emptied can match the speed and efficiency of a drywasher that will run a cubic yard per hour. Heck, that is only two minutes per cubic foot! You would have to do four or five loads per minute in a 5 gallon bucket to match that rate.

And any drywasher will trap a high percentage of micron sized gold if operated correctly. Much more than wiill sink through material in a bucket being turned.

The material in the bucket is not in suspension. and is not being concentrated...only stratified to the bottom.

I think I will stick with my methods. If you would care to run your machine against any drywasher (even a little jerk rope puffer) and compare volume,recovery or total gold recovered daily I would be happy to do that.

Bob

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My sole purpose of inventing a simple inexpensive method to wet/dry wash for gold was to enjoy mining without the pollution of blowing dust. When I'm done running the tub at the end of the day, the only dust I have to contend with, is the dust left in a small sample to pan, in a quart of water, and not my lungs. Thanks for your interest, bob

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That makes sense. And it is probably a great little tester. I think the comparison to a drywasher for production and efficiency is a little overblown...

...It is a cool little machine and if that is how you are getting your gold then bless your heart my friend!

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My friend Harley, who I golf with every Monday, had a dry washer when I met him three years ago. He hard no experience gold mining, but I invited him out to my diggings. He ran his dry washer and I ran my tub. No way he could run the same amount of gravel as I could. He has a Blue Bowl, which he recovers my 70mesh and finer gold. He got rid of his dry-washer, but enjoys his Blue Gold, as I also do, for the recovery of my fine gold. Thanks, bob

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wet/dry

question: when you fill a five gallon pail say 1/2 full how many turns or how long do you turn this bucket/spin it by hand?_______ and when done how far down do you dig out the material to run some more?______

Joe

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Set the bucket at about 15-20 degrees, the gravel as you rotate spills out on its own, just keep scooping in more to the back of the bucket. When finish I use a small hand rake, then a scoop, similar to what you carry when detecting. When less than a quart of gravel remains, dump in a plastic bag, to pan later.

When using the larger 18" tub, I use a small frying pan to scoop into and scoop out into an empty bucket so it can be dumped on the side of the wash. Later its easier to back-fill the wash.

Same when running wet next to a stream or river, then use only a small hand rake to scoop out.

Wet, dry or damp it's easy to practice with hammered lead shot. If the lead is recovered than surly the gold will be there. Where I'm mining now, am getting lot's of bird shot. Again, thanks for your interest, bob. Don't Worry Be Happy

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wet/dry

I just took about a half gallon of dry dirt and put in 6 pieces of smashed birdshot sized lead into a five gallon pail and held it about 30 degrees and rolled it on the garage floor on edge for a test and kept scooping out the top layers until i got down to about 1/2 cup (about five minutes) and then wet panned out that 1/2 cup and recovered everything....it did work on recovering every piece of lead i put in there.

How does the damp dirt in the bucket separate as you would think the finer birdshot/gold would get stuck to the dirt around it?_______ or do you keep the bucket full of water when doing the damp or wet dirt..... the dry worked pretty good at recovering with that technique.ad i could bring quart sized samples home to run thru my gold hog mat.

Joe

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Wet/dry,

Have you tested the "tailings" to see if you were losing any gold?

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My favorite time to dry wash with the tub, is a week after it rains, Gold being at about twice as heavy as lead and lead being about two and half times heavier than black sand, the tumbling action will only let the fine light particles stick to the larger pieces.

Earlier this year after a rain, and the gravel balled when squeezed with my fist, I recovered in that run: One half gram nugget, half a dozen one and two grain pickers and fines totaling two grams.

When panning, instead of using Jet Dry, I use something better and cheaper, called Natural Clarifier for swimming pools. Wal-Mart sells it by the quart, enough to treat 96,000gal. of panning water. Use only a few drops.

Thanks, bob

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Back in the day I worked with some guys on a big operation in Hillsboro. They fed a big grizzly in a header box and that ran over a coarse sluice. Then through some boil boxes and through a fine screen. The finest tailings were fed into a machine a lot like yours. It was a helical drum concentrator. The owner called it a "Goose".

It was a drum about twelve feet long and four or five feet in diameter. It turned on an axis. The inside was lined with a dense rubber matting that overlapped. It was tilted at a slight angle down on the tailings end and had a series of spraybarrs.

The material was delivered about three feet from the high end of the drum at a slow rate and the material spread out nicely ass the drum rolled. Waste traveled down as a little wave of slurry and concentrates walked uphill on the little ridges of the rubber mat. Like a gold wheel only sideways.

There was a little lip on the high end of the drum and a bucket sat below the lip. You adjusted the angle of the drum so that the material stayed down in the corner of the drum below the feed chute. So you had a steady dribble of black concentrates dribbling into the bucket. The helical rubber lining in the drum walked it out of there while the lightest slurry exited through a chute on the downhill side.

Would a helical spiral surface on the sides of your bucket make it better? Maybe a strip of flooring or something? Why not cut a hole in the center of the bucket and lay it down a bit more? You could feed over the edge of the bucket and let the waste go out the hole in the bottom. When you clean up instead of scooping off the top just increase the angle of the bucket gradually and let the light stuff go out the hole naturally. The helix should be wound to constantly take the heavies down instead of up. And I suppose you could only turn your bucket one way.

It would turn a bucket into a helical drum concentrator just like that big one. I have my doubts about efficiency in sticky dirt but bone dry or a nice feed of slurry would probably get all the gold in the test.

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Tried a sink drain fitting in the bottom of the bucket, but only works on 1/4" screened or less gravel. Takes to much time to screen, Rake the area first with a 4-tong rake, then run the rest, the larger gravel helps the tumbling action.

Forgot to mention in my earlier post. My friend Harley ran several buckets of my tub tailings, after panning and running through his Blue Bowl, there was not one speck of gold. Ran his dry-wash tailings and other dry-washer tailings and recovered fine gold.

Dry-washers by there nature are anti gravity. The tub method uses gravity at it's best.

Thanks, bob

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I can see where running damp material the larger rocks would help in there...

O.K.I am sold! I will make me one and play with it this winter. It might be just the ticket for dry panning a bucket of concentrates down and working vacuumed sweepings...jjust throw the bucket on the carousel and when you vac a fresh bucket your concentrates are done.

Oh crap... When I close my eyes I can see a whole array of turning buckets on a frame fed by a hopper and me shoveling like crazy trying to keep up with it...

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