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photos of old mine


bsumbdy

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Going through old photos I found these and they got me thinking. I took these several years ago before i was into prospecting. This mine was old and pretty well hidden. Now I want to go back to prospect! What do you think of the pics of the ore vein? I'm thinking some copper, but could be some gold? Any suggestions? Thanks

Chris

Mine is in Southern AZ

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post-26180-0-71136600-1375067230_thumb.j

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Going through old photos I found these and they got me thinking. I took these several years ago before i was into prospecting. This mine was old and pretty well hidden. Now I want to go back to prospect! What do you think of the pics of the ore vein? I'm thinking some copper, but could be some gold? Any suggestions? Thanks

Chris

Mine is in Southern AZ

You are looking. at a copper vein that is in a sulphide. Free gold is generally in an oxidized vein with iron near the surface. As ore goes down the iron gives way to copper and free gold disappears.

Stay out of mines, especially sulphide mines. Even if they are only a few feet deep. Bad air kills more miners than rocks do.

Sure it could have some gold in it. It is not the classic free gold vein. Great copper though. Look for rusty quartz with hematite in the area and maybe there will be some gold.

Copper and gold are found together. Just not in the same spot in an ore body. That vein is an offshoot of a much larger ore body that probably does have some gold.

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Not that I would suggest the inexperienced & untrained ever enter underground mine workings. But, in dry workings, explosive methane gas is seldom an issue. Bad or dead air (oxygen deficient) can be ascertained with a simple lit candle, in a tin can. If the flame shrinks, you are entering oxygen deficient air & its time to back out. Worked underground as a mine rescue team captain in my younger years. Have packed out as many dead, as I have fingers. Not a nice way to die.

Edited by elder-miner
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Not that I would suggest the inexperienced & untrained ever enter underground mine workings. But, in dry workings, explosive methane gas is seldom an issue. Bad or dead apir (oxygen deficient) can be ascertained with a simple lit candle, in a tin can. If the flame shrinks, you are entering oxygen deficient air & its time to back out. Worked underground as a mine rescue team captain in my younger years. Have packed out as many dead, as I have fingers. Not

a nice way to die.

I hate to tell you this but you are dead wrong. Any man with underground experience knows that H2S can kill you and never displace enough oxygen to cause an O2 meter to alarm.

Your advice runs contrary to all training and knowledge. Anyone with real underground experience knows better.

Never enter any mine unless you know what the air is comprised of. Especially if sulphides are present. There is no way to sagely do it without ann air monitor and none of the techniques above will give you any clue as to the quality of the air in a mine.

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I hate to tell you this but you are dead wrong. Any man with underground experience knows that H2S can kill you and never displace enough oxygen to cause an O2 meter to alarm.

Your advice runs contrary to all training and knowledge. Anyone with real underground experience knows better.

Never enter any mine unless you know what the air is comprised of. Especially if sulphides are present. There is no way to sagely do it without ann air monitor and none of the techniques above will give you any clue as to the quality of the air in a mine.

I beg to differ. Statistically, you are about as apt to win a $100 million dollar Mega Bucks lottery, as getting killed by H2S gas in an underground mine. Sadly, it happened at the Barnett Complex mine in 1971.But that was a rare occurrence, the last previously known fatality in a metal mine, due to hydrogen sulfide gas, occurred in 1925.

The Barnett Complex mine deaths were caused by inexperience & lax safety practices.

1), The failure of mine officials and workers to recognize the lethal character of concentrated hydrogen sulfide gas owing in part to intermittent exposure to the gas over a period of years in quantities which produced no lasting harmful effects.

2), While the forced ventilation system in the mine was satisfactory for normal operations, the system on the eighth level proved to be inadequate for the unusual situation which was created by (1) the prolonged inflow of water containing hydrogen sulfide and (2) the failure of one of the inline fans.

3), The area was not "dangered off" as a follow up to any oral warnings that may have been given to the men, and checks were not made on the concentrations of hydrogen sulfide in the eighth level south drift at the start of the day shift, April 12, 1971.

4), The failure of mine management and workers to realize that, until the fans had been operated for a length of time sufficient to assure removal of concentrations of the gas, the entire 800 South drift was hazardous.

http://www.usmra.com/saxsewell/barnett.htm

H2S is generally produced naturally from decaying organic matter. It has an extremely unpleasant, rotten egg odor at low concentrations and a sweetish odor at higher concentrations. When experienced mine safety inspectors and/or miners detect it with a meter, or get a whiff that smell, they immediately back out of the area, then take normal safety precautions, generally ventilating the area.

In 50 years, I have never experienced H2S gas in dry workings. In old unused, or abandoned wet unventilated timbered workings, I have both smelled & detected it, in non-lethal trace amounts.

https://www.osha.gov/SLTC/hydrogensulfide/hydrogensulfide_found.html

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/MMG/MMG.asp?id=385&tid=67

Again, if you are inexperienced, untrained, I do not suggest anyone explore underground mine workings. Actually, entering dead oxygen deficient air, is an easy way to die. You get tired, set down to rest, fall asleep & never wake up.

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Thank you thats what I was looking to find out. Was in there photographing some bats and a rattlesnake. maybe 25 foot back is all.

Again thanks everyone for your experience!

Chris

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