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I've got some suspect rocks I would like to cut open. Any suggestions as to how best to do this? I'd rather not loose a lot of material doing it.

Thanks

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Thanks Frank and Fred.

I'll checkout the Home Dump for the whetstone, but I can't afford any equipment. I've got a friend who has a shop with what I'll need except GD's suggested diamond blade.

One of the rocks I want to open is that suspect GB find in photo 913 in Karl's "GB ANYONE" topic. It's about the size of a checker piece, but thicker. There is quartz and maybe basalt in it, so a diamond blade will be a must. It is so darn heavy and magnetic, I've just got to look inside. I could window it, but I want to cut off a quarter of it to see a big cross section.

Thanks,

.

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If there's quartz it 100% is not a meteorite; quartz does not exist in meteorites. Basalt is a type of rock, not a constituent.

Edited by Mikestang
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You're right Mike.

I'm just wondering what's inside to make it heavy. I gave up on it being a meteorite, it's crusted with little bits of quartz in a black matrix. There's a photo of it, P1000913 in Karlfarris' "GB ANYONE" topic. Take a look. I'd like to hear what others think might be inside.

It's heavy like an iron, magnetic, crusted with quartz, and I don't think it's a meteorite. I'm curious to know what is in there. Don't want to get fooled by something else like it on my next GB outing.

Planning to start cutting it this weekend.

Thanks

Edited by saginaw72
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there is a lot of hot magnetic/quartz schisty type stones scattered around gold basin...I was even fooled by onea year or so ago...I did not realize how bad my vision had got until that stone. I took it back to camp and washed it off, that is when I could see little flecks of quartz...so then I broke it up just to be sure it was not a gold speci ...

just a love stone and like my heart all broken up...

You may have a gold/ironstone/quartz specimen...if there is gold in it you should (usually) see bits showing through...

fred

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If there's quartz it 100% is not a meteorite; quartz does not exist in meteorites.

Not true. Quartz has been found as a constituent in some meteorites. Here is an example:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1945-5100.2006.tb00495.x/pdf

And another example:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3021006/

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Well, it turned out to be one of Fred's love stones. My buddy and I cut it open tonight and there was nothing inside worth talking about, but I will post some photos this weekend for anyone wanting to see the result.

Oh well...

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If there's quartz it 100% is not a meteorite; quartz does not exist in meteorites. Basalt is a type of rock, not a constituent.

Look up:

Magmatic cristobalite and quartz in the NWA 856 Martian meteorite
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Martian meteorites are rare of the rare of the rare. Like I said, there are (rare) exceptions to every rule. If you find a rock here on Earth and it has quartz in it, it is 99.999999999999999999% terrestrial, and I'm probably being conservative with my decimal places.

Edited by Mikestang
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Martian meteorites are rare of the rare of the rare. Like I said, there are (rare) exceptions to every rule. If you find a rock here on Earth and it has quartz in it, it is 99.999999999999999999% terrestrial, and I'm probably being conservative with my decimal places.

There are classes of meteorites more rare than martian meteorites. Although, there is some question as to whether any of the martian meteorites are even from Mars as none have been found to contain zeolites, which are very common in thee martian surface.

That is not the point though. The point is that quartz has been found in meteorites and I posted just one example. The eucrite NWA 5218 also has quartz as does NWA 4269, NWA 049, Kapoeta, etc. How much is irrelevant. Your statement was clearly wrong as you clearly stated "If there's quartz it 100% is not a meteorite; quartz does not exist in meteorites". Maybe if you spent more time researching the subject and less time trying to act as a know it all you may actually learn something and maybe some day even answer my earlier question to you of what specifically does a meteorite look like.

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Why are you nit-picking my post? My statement is not wrong, it is a rule of thumb, as I've stated already. Let me expound for you, please pay attention.

How many people do you know personally that have found a martian meteorite, or a eucrite? Please name them. How many people do you know personally that have found any type of meteorite? Finding the most "common" of all types of meteorites is more UNCOMMON than finding a diamond or gold! Dude, those type of meteorites you are talking about are SUPER SUPER RARE, and meteorites themselves are SUPER SUPER RARE, so you are talking about a super rare subset of a rare group of rocks: that is what we call and EXCEPTION TO THE RULE, because it is a very uncommon occurrence (and the quartz in them looks nothing like you are used to seeing in earth rocks). Let me say again exactly what I said before (which you quoted so I don't know how you missed it): If you find a rock here on Earth and it has quartz in it, it is 99.999999999999999999% terrestrial, and I'm probably being conservative with my decimal places. If you find a eucrite or martian meteorite, congratulations, you just won the lottery while being struck by lightning during a shark attack.

Yes, I said "If there's quartz it 100% is not a meteorite; quartz does not exist in meteorites". I rounded up. It's like saying "If it doesn't stick to a magnet, it's not a meteorite." Well there are way more types of meteorites that do not stick to magnets than there are quartz bearing. For more reading, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_of_thumb.

Mike

Edited by Mikestang
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Thanks for the input Jonno.

Really like your Cherokee story!

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Just to keep the peace http://meteorites.wu...u/ id/quartz.htm

In Johno's link, it talks about rare types with quartz in them, but a very small amount. It even states if you can see quartz, it is not a meteorite.

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I was thinking of buying a used Rock Rascal Model JM, 6" Trim Saw. I've been told this will work for specimens up to 2-3 inches, but that I could outgrow it quickly.

Would this be a good starter saw? Or is there another used/inexpensive saw that would be a better starter (less likely to outgrow fast).

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