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My recent Nevada finds


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Here is a pic of the first one I found there several weeks earlier before finding a small field and about 2 miles from the second site. The interior is dark brown with
lots of metal flakes.

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Went back several weeks later and spent the day serarching a different area with a freind using a magnet on a stick. My firend got tired and went back to the truck. When I got back to the road I walked back up just off the side of the road picking up the trash along the side of the road. When I got aboout 50 feet from the truck I spotted a stone that I did not think much of as it looked like every non-magnetic rock we had seen that day. When I put the magnet down close to it though the magnet snapped right to it. Again the interior is dark brown with lots of metal flakes.


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Edited by James_S
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Later I went back out on the other side of the road and wantered around for a whle finding a few smaller stones. One of the stones I found that day was this one, which unlike the others has a light interior with not only a a few small silvery flakes but also some iron sulfide inclusions.

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James,

These are great finds! I'm glad you shared the pictures with us.

You have shown us what 'old style' hunting is all about without the use of a metal detector.

Good luck with your other hunts today.

Mitchel

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James,

Those are not meteorites, good ol hot rocks.

Dave

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James,

These are great finds! I'm glad you shared the pictures with us.

You have shown us what 'old style' hunting is all about without the use of a metal detector.

Good luck with your other hunts today.

Mitchel

Did not have a lot of time there today, but found a couple of other interesting rocks. One highly magnetic about 2 miles before the first area. And the other has a very interesitng shape, kind of aerodynamic. But only barely magnetic. I will know more when I cut them open.

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James,

Those are not meteorites, good ol hot rocks.

Dave

I disagree. I have been studying meteorites long enough to know what to look for and have a collection of known meteorties in excess of 300 pounds. So I have seen a lot of meteorites in person as well. But yes, there are some magnetic rocks with a lot of weight for their size, which is why I did not post them as meteorites until I had a chance to cut them open and study the inside. The silvery, metal flakes of iron nickel in these specimens is the big give-a-way. The reason I collected them in the first place is because I have been searching that area for years and never found a single magnetic rock out there until I ran in to these. So I brought them home, photographed them so I have a record of them in their whole state with their weights, then I cut samples off each piece and lapped them down to study the interior. All but one have very abundant shiny metal flakes throughout the matrix and one has very visible thin, black, directional veins that look like the shock veins in so many of the meteorites in my collection. The other rock also has silvery metal flakes, but not as abundant as the other specimens. But it looks a lot like several of the aubrites I have seen.

So unless you can tell me what terrestrial rocks that have that kind of density and abundant scattered silvery metal flakes thoughout the matrix I will have to disagree with you.

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Really enjoyed the look James and is this meteorite classified yet? Very nice finds...

Thanks Bill. No, I have not sent them off yet. I just found the first one about a month ago and the others just a few weeks ago. I did not get a chance to cut them to make sure they were meteorites last week. Therefore, they have not been sent yet.

I am sending some other samples off shortly so I need to decide if I will include these in the package. The guy who classifies my meteorites wants to know what the other lab has found on my samples I sent off to them 6 years ago because he is going to start from scratch with new samples since I cannot get any type of answer from the other lab. I had several thin sections made and the samples show a lot of interesting things including defintie shock characteristics and an interesting duel lithology. But the lab wanted to send the samples off for oxygen isoptope analysis 3 years ago since they don't have the equipment. Unfortuntatley the univeristy with the machine has their own projects that take priority, so my samples have been in limbo. From what I read they only do oxygen isotope analysis on confirmed rare meteorites due to the time and cost, so I am sure that is a meteorite as well. But the lab will not tell me anything other than they are waiting on the test. So I had to do a write up on my findings such as magnetic, strongly positive on DMG nickel test, mosaic and undualtory extinction in cross polarized thin sections, etc. I pretty much have the write up finished so I can send new samples for him to start over with since I am tired of waiting on the other lab. Since I am sending them out of the country though I want to combine multiple samples in a flat rate box. Therefore, i also need to do write ups on the other samples I decide to send. Before this I already had several other samples I have been studying to see if they should be sent so I am not sure now what I am going to send first. I am waiting for some more DMG to come in to test a few samples for nickel. If they are positive then I will likely send those first because they would not be as common as these which look like H6 meteorites. The DMG should be here by Wednesday so I should be sending out whatever samples hopefully next week. I just don't want to overwhelm him with a bunch of samples a once, so I prefer to focus on anything that looks like a rarer class first. For example, this one:

You can see one of the metal flakes in the center.

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Edited by James_S
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I don't know why people think they can differentiate between a real meteorite and a terrestrial rock just by looking at a picture of the outside. Take a look at these samples of known meteorites and note the various shapes and textures. They are not all smoothe, shiny or dull black or brown.

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So unless you can tell me what terrestrial rocks that have that kind of density and abundant scattered silvery metal flakes thoughout the matrix I will have to disagree with you.

I am afraid it doesn't work like that. While you are welcome to disagree, we are not geologists, we are meteorite enthusiasts. We recognize (typically) what is and is not a meteorite. If you want to know what your terrestrial rock is then I suggest the geology department at your local university or natural history museum.

Sorry, friend, you didn't find any meteorites. You found typical hot rocks. The first picture looks interesting, but based on the others I'll wager is it terrestrial. They're good looking hot rocks, though. Where are the picts of the slices you took out of them? The one you posted has no scale reference, looks nothing like a meteorite interior, and display anything but "lots of metal flakes".

Your pictures you posted of real meteorites all look like meteorites, your rocks do not.

Keep looking, you can find one eventually!

P.S. Which lab is "the lab"? What guy is "the guy who classifies [your] meteorites]"? Please be specific, it's a small community.

Edited by Mikestang
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I am afraid it doesn't work like that.

According to who? The rule I have always heard is that just as in a court of law the burden of proof is on the claimant. I provided the evidence that these are meteorites. Since the other poster claims they are not then the burden of proof is now on him to provide the evidence to back his claim. Just like it is now your turn to provide proof that they do not look like real meteorites.

While you are welcome to disagree, we are not geologists, we are meteorite enthusiasts. We recognize (typically) what is and is not a meteorite.

So again, what in your opinion makes these terrestrial rocks?

If you want to know what your terrestrial rock is then I suggest the geology department at your local university or natural history museum.

You keep claiming these are terrestrial with no proof. You remind me of doctors who claim people have cancer simply by looking at them with no biopsies or lab tests. I have three friends this has happened to and none of them had cancer. This is why I am asking for your evidence. Anyone can pretend to be an expert and make unfounded claims. I don't want to hear unfounded claims though, I want to hear some evidence since I don't take anyone's word for things.

Sorry, friend, you didn't find any meteorites. You found typical hot rocks.

Once again based on what?

The first picture looks interesting, but based on the others I'll wager is it terrestrial. They're good looking hot rocks, though.

Again, based on what? You keep insisting they are terrestrial "hot rocks" with no evidence. And while ignoring real facts such as the fact that with years of searching that area I have never found any other magnetic rocks out there and the fact that they have silvery metal flakes and one even shows tiny, thin black directional veins all characteristic of meteorites.

Where are the picts of the slices you took out of them?

I have not had time to take photos of the cut surfaces. I have been lapping the surface to make things easier to see when I get a chance.

The one you posted has no scale reference,

On the other hand though you are clearly stating that you are not seeing the evidence such as the interior or a scale reference. So why are you even commenting like an authority on these stones before seeing the rest of the evidence? If people want to make statements of "fact" then they should look at all the evidence before doing so.

looks nothing like a meteorite interior, and display anything but "lots of metal flakes".

How many actual meteorites have you ever seen? Do you really think they are made as if with a cookie cutter so they all fit within certain narrow criteria? In fact, if you paid attention to what I wrote I never claimed that was a meteorite. I said I was testing samples to see if they should be sent. In other words if they are likely meteorites. I don't simply look at a rock, say it is a meteorite and send it off. I do as much study and testing as I can to see what stones are meteorites or very likely meteorites before sending them off. For example, the samples that have been at the lab for over 6 years now. I have had several real meteorite experts tell me that those were terrestrial as well. On the other hand I had a meteorite dealer and several other meteorite experts say that it is in fact a meteorite. If real meteorite experts cannot agree what is or is not a meteorite when they actually see samples in person what makes you think you can definitively state one way or another based on photos especially when you admit yourself you have not seen all the evidence? By the way, I tested those samples for magnetic attraction (strong) and nickel (strong). I have thoroughly examined solid samples under a stereoscope and found various features indicating it is a meteorite. And I have even had several thin sections made up, which also show evidence of being meteoritic including mosaic and undulatory extinction throughout the samples. Yet, some so-called "experts" simply looked at samples or as in your case pictures and claimed they were not meteorites because they also failed to look at all the evidence before stating their opinions. So why do you think the lab that has actually looked at the samples and ran tests on them are still studying the samples 6 years later and wants to perform oxygen isotope analysis on the samples if a few of the other so-called "experts" are claiming the samples are terrestrial? From what I have read they only perform oxygen isotope analysis on confirmed, rare meteorites due to the time and cost involved for the test. And if stones are clearly not meteorites the labs will let the person know generally within a month. So again, if the experts who actually see samples cannot agree if a stone is a meteorite or not when they actually see samples in person what makes you think you can determine what is or is not a meteorite simply by looking at a picture? Especially without seeing the interior or a scale reference.

Your pictures you posted of real meteorites all look like meteorites, your rocks do not.

I am sure everyone would love to hear your "expert" opinion of what real meteorites look like. So what do real meteorites look like specifically? Please enlighten all of us with your massive wealth of knowledge on what real meteorites look like externally. Please be very specific with your answer so none of us will ever accidently pick up a terrestrial rock mistaking it for a meteorite.

Keep looking, you can find one eventually!

Already have several times because again I know what to look for.

P.S. Which lab is "the lab"? What guy is "the guy who classifies [your] meteorites]"? Please be specific, it's a small community.

What lab I use is not relevant to the discussion. Look forward to seeing your evidence though and a thorough description of what real meteorites look like externally so we can see how mine compare.

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Uh-oh, the old "wall-of-text-I'll-quote-and-respond-to-each-sentance-individually" forum troll. Man, you're wrong and a smart ass at the same time, those two things don't go well together.

There's a wealth of knowledge out there, I know meteorites because I've collected, studied, and hunted them for 30 years. I don't have time to tell you all the basics, but I can tell a meteorite from a hot rock like a lemon from an orange. I know a lot of good folk in the meteorite community, and every single one of them will vouch for me (3 for you to start with, Bob Verish, Anne Black, Geoff Notkin, ask them if I know what a meteorite looks like). How do you know which is a lemon and which is an orange?

So you won't name your lab or "the guy who does your classifications"? What are you afraid of? No reason to be secretive here. Oh, "your guy" is probably not a trained meteoriticist and your afraid that your rocks aren't meteorites, I get it!

None of what you wrote makes your hot rocks meteorites, and considering that I'll wager most of your 300 pound collection are not meteorites either. You are a typical person who's told what they found is not a meteorite and freaks out about it. It's nothing personal. Look, post those picts to the MetList and see what responses you get, they'll be along the lines of what Dave and I have said.

You say you've found a few? Kindly provide MetBul links to them. Thanks!

Edited by Mikestang
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Hey guys ,

Check out this meteorite I found. You know how I know its a meteorite for sure? Because of the impact crater , and because I found a GPS next to it! James_S, where do you get yours classified? I found a whole field of these meteorites !! yahoo!!

DSC05777_zps698bfe4f.jpg

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One more quick thing, I'm sure my posts read like some asshole wrote it, but that's not the tone I wrote them in. I'm a sarcastic and cynical, and at the same time easy going and a happy dude, so read it with a smile and come out to a group hunt some time and hang around the camp fire; you'll learn more that way than sitting in front of a computer screen any day of the week.

Edited by Mikestang
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Hey guys ,

Check out this meteorite I found. You know how I know its a meteorite for sure? Because of the impact crater , and because I found a GPS next to it! James_S, where do you get yours classified? I found a whole field of these meteorites !! yahoo!!

And just as I type my last post, Adam shows you he is even more of a smart ass than I am! lol

Edited by Mikestang
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James,

Where do you send off your samples for testing?

Jim

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The first one:



  • post-26752-0-80159300-1367713897_thumb.j

is worth looking at further for sure, at least worth having someone look at in person. The exterior surface it a bit too rough and pitted, but it kind of reminds me of a NWA chondrite; unfortunately only one pict and no interior shot it's tough to say more. Did you determine its bulk density? How about a streak test on its interior?

I can say with almost certainty (99.99%) that the rest are nothing special, toss 'em in your rock garden in the back and keep looking!

Edited by Mikestang
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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 1 month later...

To put in my two cents worth. I believe a few of your rock are just plain Hematite.

Magnetic & heavy- yes, but not all are meteorites ( in my opion )

The lab I use is , Meteorite Research Center in Pahrump, NV.

Edited by Golden Ray
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To put in my two cents worth. I believe a few of your rock are just plain Hematite.

Magnetic & heavy- yes, but not all are meteorites ( in my opion )

The lab I use is , Meteorite Research Center in Pahrump, NV.

Ray,

Never knew there was a Meteorite research center in Pahrump, thanks for the info. How do they analyze samples?

Dave

Edited by DolanDave
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