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What are laws on Arizona State Land


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I don't think you are allowed to pass gas on "State Trust Land," much less remove meteorites - or anything else. Maybe different on "State" land?

Terry is pretty much right. AZ has what is known at State Trust Land. Technically, you are not even allowed to tresspass on it as they are not considerd public land. And a SLUP is required for any activity.

http://www.azland.gov/support/faqs.htm

Jim

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I might be wrong here....but all other land, not considered State Trust Land, is not managed by the State.

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This topic causes me to ask a question about other wilderness areas managed by BLM and other agencies. There are many of these in AZ. Some can be meteorite hunted and others can't. As Jim has informed me it depends upon the Land Use Plan in effect. Is there a list of those land use plans for both state and federal managed lands?

Mitchel

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Ya Know Mitchel, you can do some of this digging yourself! :Just_Cuz_06:http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/info.html

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Jim, I had started this so thanks for the link. I got to a point where I wanted to see the Land Use Plans online and I didn't see them. Are all of those plans online or is that something that requires an office call to some of the BLMs around the state and country? I have maps of the areas I had wondered about and many of them are around Parker and western Arizona. The first thing will be to make a list of the 'sensitive' or special areas that BLM manages and then put a yes or no to meteorites. I could make this available to you if you want it.

Mitchel

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Jim, I had started this so thanks for the link. I got to a point where I wanted to see the Land Use Plans online and I didn't see them. Are all of those plans online or is that something that requires an office call to some of the BLMs around the state and country? I have maps of the areas I had wondered about and many of them are around Parker and western Arizona. The first thing will be to make a list of the 'sensitive' or special areas that BLM manages and then put a yes or no to meteorites. I could make this available to you if you want it.

Mitchel

Could it be available to me, too? Pretty please? I am so far from having any of this figured out. Trying to figure out a possible weekend trip w/the family in the near future. ......

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These are the Wilderness Areas in Arizona administered by the BLM:

http://www.blm.gov/az/wildarea-map.htm

Here are the land use plans:

http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/planning.html

There are lots of Wilderness Areas but only a few land use plans.

Now I want to make it simple and make a list where it is open and closed a metal detector!

Edited by mn90403
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I am not an expert, and if meteor hunting were the same thing getting minerals on State trust land, it would be well beyond what any of us can afford for a recreational activity.


I took this off the GPAA forum from a discussion about what it takes to get mineral rights on State trust land. I'm not an expert, but I would think meteors would be similar. Basically after a $1600 permit fee and a $15000 bond, you can prospect, but not keep anything you find, unless it's in the approved Exploration Plan of Operation. Arizona State Land Department

MINERAL EXPLORATION PERMITS

1. A non-refundable filing fee of $500.00 is required for each application.
2. Applications must be typed or printed in ink. Applications that are
incomplete or illegible will be
returned.
3. The minimum acreage per application is a rectangular subdivision of 20
acres, more or less, or lots, in
any one section of the public land survey.
4. A maximum 640 acres or one whole section is allowed per application.
5. An Exploration Permit is valid for one year, renewable up to five years.
There is a $500.00 fee
associated with each annual renewal. The renewal form may be downloaded at:
http://www.land.state.az.us/programs/operations/applications/minerals/MINEXP
RENEWAPP.pdf
6. The application must be signed by the applicant(s) or an authorized
agent. If an agent is filing for the
applicant, a notarized Power of Attorney must be filed with the ASLD. The
filing fee for a Power of
Attorney is $50.00.
7. Lease boundaries, access routes, mine workings, roads, water sources,
residences, utilities, etc. must
be plotted separately on a USGS Topographic Map included with the
application.
8. An environmental disclosure questionnaire, which is attached to the
application when downloaded,
must accompany each application.
9. The processing of an Exploration Permit may take up to forty-five days.

10. Application is reviewed by the ASLD Minerals Section and if appropriate,
by other ASLD divisions,
governmental agencies and/or individuals from the private sector.
11. An initial rental fee of $2.00 per acre is due within thirty days upon
notification of the intent to issue the
permit. The $2.00 rental fee is for the first and second year of the permit.
However, although the rent
is prepaid for second year, the permit must still be renewed for that year.
Rental fees for years three
thru five are $1.00 per acre per year and due annually when the permit is
renewed.
12. A bond (typically in the amount of $3,000 for a single permit or a
blanket bond of $15,000 for five or
more permits held by an individual or company) is also due within thirty
days upon notification of the
intent to issue the permit. Bond amounts may be increased during the life of
the permit as determined
by the ASLD upon review of the proposed exploration activities as detailed
in the Exploration Plan of
Operation.
13. An Exploration Plan of Operation must be submitted and approved by the
ASLD prior to startup of any
exploration activities. The form may be downloaded at:
http://www.land.state.az.us/programs/operations/applications/minerals/EXPO.p
df
14. If the proposed exploration activities require any surface disturbance,
then Archaeological and Plant
survey reports will be requested to be submitted to the ASLD for review and
approval. Two paper
copies of the Archaeological survey report and one copy of the Plant survey
report, as well as
electronic copies of both reports (in PDF format) are required. Information
concerning archaeological
surveys may be viewed at:
http://www.land.state.az.us/programs/natural/cultural_res_mgt.htm
Information related to plant surveys may be viewed at:
http://www.land.state.az.us/programs/natural/nativePlantSurveys.htm
15. The annual minimum work expenditure requirements are:
. $10.00 per acre per year for years one and two; and
. $20.00 per acre per year for years three thru five.
Acceptable expenditures include those resources used to determine the
existence or nonexistence of
a valuable mineral deposit, including but not limited to geological,
geochemical, or geophysical surveys
conducted by qualified experts, drilling and sampling, and excavation,
together with the costs of assay
and metallurgical testing of samples from the permitted land. Proof of work
expenditures must be
submitted to the ASLD Minerals Section each year in the form of invoices and
paid receipts. If no work
was completed on-site, the applicant must pay the ASLD an amount equal to
the required per acre
expenditure listed above for whichever year the permit is in.
16. No exploration work can proceed without the express and written approval
of the Exploration Plan of
Operation by the ASLD. This approval includes the clearance of required
archaeological and native
plant surveys by the ASLD staff. Any work conducted on the Permit without
this approval will not be
accepted as a qualified expenditure.
17. An Exploration Permit is neither a right to mine nor does allow for the
removal of any valuable
minerals, except as approved by the ASLD within an Exploration Plan of
Operation.
18. If discovery of a valuable mineral deposit is made, the permittee must
apply for and obtain a mineral
lease before any mining activities can begin.

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All of the BLM Wilderness lands in the Kingman District can be hunted for gold and meteorites with a metal detector but no mining is allowed. This probably means dry washing but I don't do that so someone who wants to turn that much dirt in a wilderness area can let us know.

The only land managed by the BLM that I have been told so far that is forbidden from metal detecting is Coyote Butes and the Barry Goldwater Range (still live ammo).

Does anyone else know of more?

Mitchel

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There seems to be 'cross designations' within the BLM system which may have a wilderness area and a Monument or other area which is more sensitive protected. For me based upon the responses that I have gotten from the offices, I'll stay away from those areas. All other wilderness areas I will hunt.

BLM personnel warn me that the National Parks and Forrest Service don't follow their guidelines but I think there is enough BLM land in clubs and unclaimed to keep me busy.

If someone wants to know about BLM in different states other than Arizona then we should start a different thread. This one was originally for State of Arizona Trust Lands and not specifically about BLM lands or wilderness.

There is a piece of state land in Gold Basin surrounded by BLM lands. Does anyone know about that?

Mitchel

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:grr01: GGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGGSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS such insanity :th: rules,regs.POO,NOI, land classification for every day a the year,exclusions,delusions,confusions,5 agencies with conflicting regs on same bloody stinkn' piece a lousy dirt,rock,critter,plant and by god even the friggn' air and noise and NOW a bloody SLUP- say what is that a stupid lousy unrealistic plan??? Yain't seen nuttn'---don't know nuttn'--ain't lookn' fer nuttn'--- ain't found nuttn' and leave me the F alone :2mo5pow:

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Mitchel,

If you want to see who owns or controls what in Mohave County, here it is:

http://mcimv.co.mohave.az.us/imf/imf.jsp?site=moh

Keep in mind, this stuff is nothing new to most of us in AZ.

Jim

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I just bought an Atkins DVD for Franconia!

On your map of Gold Basin are those two state land parcels (full sections in blue). Does anyone avoid them because it is state land?

I'm a member of 3 clubs in Gold Basin. I'm thinking about buying a place in Kingman.

Mitchel

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The blue is State lands. Ok to camp, hunt or fish without a permit with license for 14 days. Other-wise you must buy a pass to camp on this state land. Metal detecting is not permited period. Trust me.

Wayne

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