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Javalina , what do they taste like


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I might have a chance to hunt javalina and thought I would ask if anyone has had any and what they taste like.

Also any recipies for them.

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Javalina Recipe: Dig a fire pit, line it with stones...Wire the prepared javalina, whole, onto an oak or mesquite board, place the board mounted javalina onto a bed of coals, cover with green mequite branches then bury the whole thing and let cook for about 5 hours...Then dig up the javalina, undo the wires, throw the javalina away and eat the board... Time tested recipe :ROFL: Cheers, Unc

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Not bad if you handle them right.

They have Musk Glands that if not dealt with you can just chuck out the Meat unless you like the taste of Skunk Azz.

A good soaking in Vinegar water and salt takes some of the pong out of the Meat.

http://www.javelinahunter.com/scent_gland.htm

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Not bad if you handle them right.

They have Musk Glands that if not dealt with you can just chuck out the Meat unless you like the taste of Skunk Azz.

A good soaking in Vinegar water and salt takes some of the pong out of the Meat.

http://www.javelinah...scent_gland.htm

HEard the same thing- some are buried in the meat- racoon, to, I believe(( at least that's what the trapper was saying as she was butchering one /cutting out the glands on ? BIzarre Foods?, I think)).
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I have had it and it was good, ditto on the scent glands they MUST be removed. Then ya stuff with fruit like oranges, apples, etc. with some bread. Then mix Coke or Pepsi with lots of honey use tinfoil to wrap and coat with the honey pop mix. Add spices to taste like pepper, garlic, salt, etc. Seal it up wrapping in several layers of foil and place in a pre prepared hot bed of coals in a small pit cover with coals and dirt and wait about 1 hour per pound of pig or a bit longer and enjoy.

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Greasy pork at best ... skunky at worst. One of the keys is how they are handled in the field. Just like deer, elk or antelope the quicker you cool the animal after killing the better. Here is a sequence from my deer hunting days ... no I haven't given up on going hunting just haven't been in two years and miss it dearly ... any way here is what I do.

Shoot the animal, make sure it is dead, with one of two knives cut off the sex organ in the case of the male, cut around the anus(and vaginal area in case of female) but don't try to remove yet, now with same knife cut off all scent glands WITHOUT touching with your hands, use latex gloves if necessary... now put first knife aside not to be used again. Remove latex gloves if they were used with knife number one. Put on a second pair if you feel better using them, take up the second sharp knife and open body cavity, reach in and cut around diaphragm, reach further inside through chest cavity toward throat and cut wind pipe/esopagus yubes as high into throat as possible, pull heart, lungs, tubes out, roll out guts and pull rectum cuts through with gut pile. Messy part is now over. Now cool the meat as soon as possible and as quickly as possible. In the desert a critter can become decomposed enough to render it ineditable in a mere hour or two in direct sun. Best to have a chest full of ice and fill the body cavity to cool the meat. Keep it in the shaded side of your vehicle getting it home ... aging is a personal choice but if it is too warm to do so butcher as soon as possible and refrigerate or freeze. If the plan is too cook the animal whole do so as soon as possible after killing the animal. The shorter the time from killing to cool or refrigerated ... or the fire pit ... the better the meat will taste. Very gamey meat for the most part is a result of poor field processing and cooling barring of course a strong flavored feed that the animal lived on.

Mike F

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Daniel Boone stuff above......

Pat Boone stuff here.....Drive to the hunt area with the A/C on high....get close to the tree stand...make the short walk....

be quite and wait for the herd to show up.....

Shoot the biggest meanest looking one.....get close and shoot him again in case he's faking it....

Lean rifle across carcass....sit on ground with the head of the dead animal in your lap......take two good pics....

One pic for the forum and one for your wallet (camp fire braggin rights)....

Leave dead pig and gut pile on ground for the coyotes :droolin: they'll love you for it....

Drive to the nearest Rib Crib and make a big entrance with your bloody Cami's on......

Order a full slab of pork ribs....lots of hot sauce....Fried Okrie....BBQ beans....potatoes chunks....cold beer...

Take a pic of the plate full......chow down....more beer....more French garlic toast......more beer....

Pay tab + 25% ( big time hunters always leave bigger tips)....get home in time for siesta.....

Post pics on forum.....clean gun and get ready for next years Javalina hunt..... :thumbsupanim

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Don ... you had me until the fried OKRA ... hate that stuff ... must be my Northern New England Yankee roots! The rest of it sounds pretty good! I would only eat Javelina if nothing else was available. Not the best tasting protein out there even with the best of field preparation.

Mike F

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Javelina is great!

Only one musk gland on the top of the rump. It comes off with the hide. Most hunters dont even know it is there. It looks like a nipple on the back. Dont mess with it. There is nothing that you can do with that gland that would be beneficial. Unless you get sloppy with field dressing and get the hair all over the meat javelina is very mild. And fiddling with that thing on his back wont make situations any better at all.

Homefire posted a great link but it seems to have been misinterpreted. Dont touch the gland! Dont try to cut it off! It will secrete musk. The musk is in the hair all over the pig. Just skin the animal and dont let the hair touch the meat. Exactly like a buck deer. It is a whole lot better to just leave that thing alone and do a good job skinning. It is explained in detail here...

http://www.javelinahunter.com/field_dressing.htm

This website is the best source on the net! Anyone wanting to learn the real deal on hunting javelinas need only to browse this site.

The meat is mild. Never tasted a gamey one and I have eaten plenty. Javelina has no fat so it may need some help with a little bacon in a stew pot or ground with a fat pork roast for sausage or cured loaves. It is a little stringy if you dont know how to cut it. Deep fried it is as tender as it can be. And it falls apart just like a lean pork roast after four hours in a slow cooker.

The only things that can make a javelina unfit to eat is a stressed animal, a bad shot or a bad field dress. Like any game the secret is in the hunt, the shot, and the cleaning. Shoot one on the sly, get a one shot kill and do a neat field dress in chilly weather and javelina is a great treat!

Young pigs are really good. It is tough to tell size on those suckers. If you want to tell age look at the knees. Big mature adults wear all the hair off the knees rooting around and get a big callous there. Young pigs have nice looking knees. It is about the only way to tell size.Use a varmint squealer if you bust a herd before you get a shot. They will come right back at you and try to attack you! It is the easiest way to score one!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Shot a many of them.

The old M1 Carbine worked most well.

Some what like a 38 or 357 in rifle it kicked there butt.

Hitting them in the chest as they come at you they dropped like a Rock.

Heart Lung shots they dropped Real fast.

Didn't mess up much meat with that one.

Hell, they go down good with a .22 long rifle about the same.

Sorta like a Dog! A 35lb one is BIG!

Best I ever did was 40 lbs in the winter.

Yep, We would walk them up while they was shading down in the cool and things would get sorta wild when they busted out of the shade and came at ya.

Had one runing at me CLACKING REAL BAD and bouced off my left leg.

Though for sure he Chomped me.

My Buddy poped him 7 ft away from me.

I know a Hole in a rock on HY 86 that I can bet serious money there will be some in any time of the year.

All you see from the road is a single bump of rock.

On the other side is a 10 ft hole in the rocks they love.

That there is My Honey Hole.

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Bob's take is spot on and is how I learned to process them.

Never use galvanized wire (chicken wire) to cook, it will produce a toxic gas and make the meat taste like sulfur.

You forgot the collard greens Don :)

Greens, beans and cornbread! Thats real cornbread Mike, not that darn yankee jonnie cake.

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Hey, the most important aspect of this topic is that you must cook Javelina well done. They have tularemia in huge numbers. It is exactly like the plague. Most animals are very healthy but test positive for tularemia antibodies. No big deal if you cook it well. And recently in Arizona they have rabies. Bad, BAD stuff.

Often the livers will have "white spots" or bleached out looking areas on the lobes. This is TULAREMIA! Wear your rubber gloves! I take a dozen pairs in my pack, a damp cloth and a squirt bottle of the hand sanitizer. I make sure the raw meat is kept quarantined until it is cooked and I wash the counter and tools carefully. Just like domestic pork or beef can give you botulus or trichinosis. The exact same precautions!

So as long as you cook it well it is great. But a hunter should not overlook this consideration. The same goes with almost all wild meat and folks that eat it all the time have their own particular way of dealing with it. Pit BBQ, slow cooker, or made into sausage and cooked in thin patties there is no problem. But there is always the guy that tries to lay a "steak" on the grill or skillet and it draws up into a thick ball of rubber that is red in the middle. That is really bad news!

Edited by Bedrock Bob
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Yup ... You are 100% right Bob ... all wild meat needs to be cooked ... it ain't like a rare filet mignon beefsteak ... unless of course you like waking in the middle of the night sweating, and puking your guts out to the point you really believe it was your stomach that just passed through your mouth ... been there once ... never again. Cook the meat!!!!

Mike F

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Don't know if they can carry Trig but I had a Uncle that had the crap.

10-15 years he always complained about Neck Pains.

Over the Years he went to every Doctor within miles.

They just gave him Muscle Relaxants and push him out the door.

He got talking to Some Old Country Doc in Up State NY about it.

He didn't even look at him and Said Ya Got the Trig.

He had it checked out and Yep! That's what is was.

He was better in a Month taking some pills to kill the little shits living in his Neck Muscles.

Trichinosis is nasty stuff.

Edited by homefire
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I have nevern heard of it in javelina, but I know trichinosos and brucellus is rampant in the wild hog population here. Tularemia too.

Feral hogs are a big problem now days. Back in the 1800's the old timers brought lard hogs to render lard. They got loose over in the Animas and have been triving down there for 150 years. The Texans got Russian Boars started here near Cloudcroft and they spread all in those mountians. They brought RUssians in horse trailers and turned them lose on private ranch land in several spots. Then they have been on the Pecos river over by Roswell for years and now they are expanding. There was a fellow near Radium Springs that turned a bunch of hogs loose by the river back in the 80's and there has been a few living over by Crow Canyon for decades. But lately things have been multiplying. You can find them on both sides of the river from Hatch to Las Cruces. There is a whole bunch of them.

Plenty of pork out there! And the Game and Fish wants them eradicated. BLM hates to see it happen too.

Here is my favorite way to do a hog or a couple of javelinas -

Take the big rear hams and debone them. Use for pot roasts and then make tacos or green chile stew. Take all the rest of the meat off the bone and cut into cubes small enough to pass into a grinder. Freeze the meat until almost solid. (That soft lean meat is mushy and wont grind well otherwise.) Grind into a big pile and then grind in some pork fat to hold it together.

Chop a bunch of fine onion, jalapenos, jabaneros and garlic. Sea salt and black pepper. Ground red chiles. Make a big meat loaf out of it all and fry a piece. Taste and re-season. A lot of sage is good, some folks like smoke flavoring. It is fun and a couple javelinas make a whole freezer full of great home made sausage. By the time you get it hot enough and enough sage and black pepper you will be a sausage master!

Wrap it all in appropriatealy sized chunks in slick sided butcher paper tightly. It will keep for a year or more in the freezer. It makes great loose meat tacos, sandwich patties, spaghetti sauce and chile con carne. I use it with Hamburger Helper too.

It takes one hour to properly gut, skin, and debone a javelina in the field. I dont drag the nasty head, hide and carcass back to my house! I leave all that in the field and bring home a cool cotton bag of iced down meat. Then it takes one more hour to wash, clean and trim the meat for freezing. After we get a couple like that in the freezer we make a big batch of sausage. It takes about two hours to chop and mix it all and wrap it up for the final freeze.

The four big rear hams are generally made into a gallon of posole, a callon of chile colorado, and two gallons of green chile stew. These are frozen in plastic containers. It takes about six hours to cook all the stews and get them in the freezer.

I generally spend about four days hunting, butchering and cooking javelina. When it is all over I have the main course for about 60 meals in the freezer and a lot of it already pre-cooked. It is all top shelf eating! No stringy meat or wild tasting rubber crap to swallow. And a great variety of foods so you dont get burned out on it and let it waste in the freezer or as leftovers.

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I have hunted and killed 22 of them since moving here a LONG time ago. Normally give the meat away but if taken care of, scent gland area removed at kill site before butchering they can taste ok in the crock pot full of stewed veggies. No food I hate but they are certainly never going to be found on a nice restaurant menu even though they are real easy to raise. Pretty simple to hunt also, once you see them the hunt is over unless you make waaay to much noise or try to stalk them while being upwind.

BTW a large rat taste about the same as a well prepared Javelina, just stating fact...

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