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Very interesting stone


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While searching an area next to my house with my metal detector I found this stony iron object. It was in a hole that looks like a crater. I was once told by a surveyor that it was a meteorite crater that fell thousands of years ago. I really wonder how he knows this because I find no information on this crater anywhere. Regardless I found this stone and it is attracted to a magnet. I ground a window on one side and I see small flecks of metal and something that appears to be crondules. I'm not to excited because there has never been a find in Vermont. The stone weighs 1.6 grams. I hope to find a nickel testing kit to see if it test positive for nickel. I can post more pictures if anyone is interested

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target="_blank"><img src="http://i615.photobucket.com/albums/tt238/ltpaulbtv/51B93962-03F5-45A5-B86C-645FF7889B34-2221-00000884D112AB87.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos" /></a>

I ground down a larger area of the stone. I put the flat surface up to a magnet and it was highly attracted to it. I hope this picture helps. I'll try another picture.

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target="_blank"><img src="http://i615.photobucket.com/albums/tt238/ltpaulbtv/8F6ED104-0BEE-40B4-BE18-E0FE4A932086-2869-000008A7DECCC7DE.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket Pictures, Images and Photos" /></a>

Hope this picture is better. It's not easy to get a good photo. This is the area I ground down.

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Nickel testing kits are not accurate enough for meteorites. Post up some in-focus close-ups (with the rock in focus instead of the table top) and let's have a better look.

X-2 Like Mike said even pics are tough, but trying to test Nickle has shown to be at best unreliable in most cases with testing kits available to average Joe.

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If you want to do a scientifically valid nickel test, try the method outlined by O. Richard Norton in Rocks from Space. It is a destructive test, meaning you have to sacrafice part of what you're testing to be pulverized. A bulk density test outlined there is another good tool for trying to discover what you have.

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